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Popular Video Games News and Current Events, Video Games News Articles.
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Dartmouth College brings smartwatch innovations to CHI2018
The latest developmental research seeks to increase the functionality of wearables while also adding to the overall user experience. (2018-04-19)
Creating 3D printed 'motion sculptures' from 2D videos
The new system uses an algorithm that can take D videos and turn them into 3D printed 'motion sculptures' that show how a human body moves through space. (2018-09-19)
Video games to improve mobility after a stroke
A joint research by the Basque research center BCBL and the London Imperial College reveals that, after a cerebral infarction, injuries in areas that control attention also cause motility problems. (2018-02-14)
Video game system technology helping physical therapists, athletic trainers
Motion-based lab technology can help physical therapists, clinicians and athletic trainers analyze how we move -- it also is very expensive. (2017-12-07)
New study shows video games can improve health in children with obesity
A new study from LSU's Pennington Biomedical Research Center showed for the first time that video games, in combination with fitness coaching and a step tracker, helped overweight children lose weight, lower their blood pressure and cholesterol and increase their physical activity. (2018-07-20)
What should be the role of computer games in education?
Game advocates are calling for a sweeping transformation of conventional education to replace traditional curricula with game-based instruction. (2016-01-12)
For blind gamers, equal access to racing video games
Computer Scientist Brian A. Smith has developed the RAD -- a racing auditory display -- to enable visually impaired gamers play the same types of racing games that sighted players play with the same speed, control, and excitement as sighted players. (2018-03-06)
Tempting your taste buds: Food cues entice consumers to overeat
The mouth-watering aroma of juicy burgers and crispy fries, and the eye-catching menu signs with delicious food pictures can tempt many hungry patrons to stop at fast-food restaurants. (2017-11-21)
Game changing game changes
Using stochastic games to analyze evolution of cooperation, leads to a surprising discovery. (2018-07-10)
Augmented-reality technology could help treat 'lazy eye'
When signals between the brain and one eye go awry, input from the other eye can become predominant, a condition called amblyopia or 'lazy eye.' New research suggests that people may be able to use wearable augmented-reality technology to reduce this visual discrepancy as they go about everyday activities. (2017-12-05)
Exposing hypocrisy can effectively reduce collective blame of Muslims for individual violent acts
White Americans were less likely to blame all Muslims for acts of terror committed by a Muslim when they were first asked to think about how much they were responsible for terrorist acts committed by other Whites. (2018-01-17)
Kitchen hygiene in the spotlight: Do TV cooking shows influence our hygiene behavior?
TV shows dealing with all aspects of cooking are popular. (2018-02-02)
Motivating gamers with personalized game design
A team of multidisciplinary researchers at the University of Waterloo has identified three basic video game player traits that will help to make game design more personalized and more effectively motivate gamers in both entertainment and work applications. (2018-07-09)
UNLV study finds no testosterone changes in esports gamers
Players of the competitive esports video game League of Legends showed no change in testosterone during game play, UNLV researchers have found. (2018-02-16)
Ball games and circuit strength training boost bone health in schoolchildren
The type of exercise that children get in school does make a difference. (2018-02-08)
Could Hollywood technology help your health?
The same technology used by the entertainment industry to animate characters such as Gollum in 'The Lord of The Rings' films, will be used to help train elite athletes, for medical diagnosis and even to help improve prosthetic limb development, in a new research center at the University of Bath launched today. (2016-05-20)
Football training in school greatly improves girls' fitness and health
Schoolgirls can achieve lower blood pressure, stronger muscles, better balance and improved jumping performance if their school puts football training on the timetable -- including girls who have never played football before. (2018-06-07)
This is not a game: NIST virtual reality aims to win for public safety
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) now aim to make virtual reality simulations more of a reality for first responders, enabling firefighters, law enforcement officers and others to learn and practice how to best operate and communicate in emergencies. (2018-05-04)
Proxies who watch advanced care planning video more likely to withhold feeding tubes
Researchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research (IFAR) and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have discovered that nursing home residents with advanced dementia are more likely to have advance directives that indicate they did should not get feeding tubes after their proxies viewed a 12-minute video on advance care planning. (2018-06-04)
An algorithm that knows when you'll get bored with your favorite mobile game
Researchers from the Tokyo-based company Silicon Studio, led by Spanish data scientist África Periáñez, have developed a new algorithm that predicts when a user will leave a mobile game. (2017-03-23)
Age and gender matter behind the wheel -- but not how you might expect
A UCLA study explored the relationship between new drivers' skills and age, gender, organized sports and video gaming. (2018-02-22)
Virtual reality makes journalism immersive, realism makes it credible
Virtual reality technology may help journalists pull an audience into their stories, but they should avoid being too flashy, or their credibility could suffer, according to a team of researchers. (2017-12-07)
A research study analyzes the mental health care community model
Results from the citizen science project 'Juegos x la salud mental', that analyzes interactions in the community formed by people with mental health problems, their family members, and caregivers, were presented and appeared in the journal Scientific Reports. (2018-03-08)
Review examines everything we know about Internet gaming disorder
An analysis of all published articles on Internet gaming disorder (IGD) notes that the condition has a complex psychosocial background, and many personal, neurobiological, familial, and environmental factors may put certain individuals at increased risk. (2018-04-10)
The explosive consequences of cow burps (video)
Cows burp up more gas than you might think possible when they're digesting grass. (2018-03-22)
Sixth-graders can learn, perform hands-only CPR
Students as young as sixth-graders can learn and perform CPR effectively and should be targeted for training, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians. (2017-11-11)
Imaging plays key role in evaluating injuries at Olympics
The Olympic Games give elite athletes a chance at athletic triumph, but also carry a risk of injury. (2018-02-26)
Poor sleep linked to suicidal behavior among children and adolescents with depressive episodes
A research abstract that will be presented on Thursday at SLEEP 2008, the 22nd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies, finds a link between poor sleep and suicidal behavior among children and adolescents with depressive episodes. (2008-06-12)
Brain training for old dogs: Could touchscreen games be the Sudoku of man's best friend?
Spoiling old dogs in their twilight years by retiring them to the sofa and forgiving them their stubbornness or disobedience, doesn't do our four-legged friends any good. (2018-02-07)
Video plus brochure helps patients make lung cancer scan decision
A short video describing the potential benefits and risks of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer in addition to an informational brochure increased patients' knowledge and reduced conflicted feelings about whether to undergo the scan more than the informational brochure alone, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2019-04-19)
Findings show potential use of artificial intelligence in detecting spread of breast cancer
Computer algorithms detected the spread of cancer to lymph nodes in women with breast cancer as well as or better than pathologists. (2017-12-12)
Women beat expectations when playing chess against men, according to new research
Data from 160,000 ranked chess players and more than five million chess matches suggests that women playing against men perform better than expected based on their official chess ratings, according to a new study by the University of Sheffield. (2018-01-30)
Foul ball! Time to abolish rule protecting MLB from liability when fans are injured
In advance of Major League Baseball's opening day on Thursday, new research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business suggests that the risk of fans being hit by a foul ball or errant bat at games has increased in recent years. (2018-03-27)
Jumping water striders know how to avoid breaking of the water surface
When escaping from attacking predators, different water strider species adjust their jump performance to their mass and morphology in order to jump off the water as fast and soon as possible without breaking of the water surface. (2016-12-08)
Researchers find new way of exploring the afterglow from the Big Bang
Researchers have developed a new way to improve our knowledge of the Big Bang by measuring radiation from its afterglow, called the cosmic microwave background radiation. (2018-04-19)
How do students use video in higher education?
A new SAGE white paper out today reveals the types of educational videos that appeal to students and where they go to find them. (2015-03-16)
Study: Length of children's sleep duration varies; can influence their weight, behavior
The duration of a child's sleep can vary, depending on the time of day, week and year. (2008-01-01)
How Xanax works (video)
Whether or not you have anxiety, you've probably heard of Xanax. (2017-12-05)
Do career NFL players have a higher risk of death?
Career players in the National Football League (NFL) had slightly higher rates of death that were not statistically different from those of replacement players who made only a few appearances during a short league strike in the 1980s. (2018-02-01)
The only video you'll ever need to watch about gluten (video)
Bakers on TV are always talking about whether their goodies have enough gluten. (2018-01-16)
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