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Popular Violence News and Current Events, Violence News Articles.
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Are money problems and violence related?
University of Iowa researchers find an association between financials stress and severe domestic abuse, but the discovery doesn't prove one leads to the other. (2016-04-25)

Immigrant parents report fewer adverse childhood experiences than US-born parents
A new study found immigrants reported fewer potentially health-harming adverse childhood experiences, such as abuse, violence, or divorce, than native-born Americans. The findings, which will be highlighted in an abstract presentation during the American Academy of Pediatrics 2017 National Conference & Exhibition, suggest immigrants may experience different forms of stress early in life than do those born in the United States. (2017-09-15)

Mental illness not to blame for gun violence study finds
Counter to a lot of public opinion, having a mental illness does not necessarily make a person more likely to commit gun violence. According to a new study, a better indicator of gun violence was access to firearms. (2019-02-06)

Ideology is not main factor that pushes children to join terrorist groups
Counter-terror efforts based on the assumption that children recruited into extremist groups are motivated by ideology are unlikely to be effective, and could even backfire, concludes a two-year research project led by the United Nations University. (2018-02-12)

Youth dating violence shaped by parents' conflict-handling views, study finds
Parents who talk to their children about nonviolent ways of resolving conflict may reduce children's likelihood of physically or psychologically abusing their dating partners later - even when parents give contradictory messages indicating that violence is acceptable in certain circumstances, University of Illinois social work professor Rachel Garthe found. (2018-11-16)

Study calls for legal reform on 'hidden crime' few male victims will talk about
A call for a change in the law to class men, forced to have sex with women, as rape victims has been made in a new study by Lancaster University researchers published today. Men have added their voices to a ground-breaking study - the first of its kind to interview men in the UK - which examines their experience of non-consensual sex with women (known as 'forced to penetrate' cases or FTP). (2019-07-25)

Study links child abuse, high school dropout
Children who have been victims of violence are more likely to drop out of high school before graduation than their peers, according to a new study co-authored by a Duke scholar. One in five people in the United States drop out of high school before graduation, which decreases their lifetime earning potential by 20 percent. More than 30 percent of the survey sample were victims of violence before the age of 16. (2017-12-01)

Violent video games found not to affect empathy
The link between playing violent video games and antisocial behavior, such as increased aggression and decreased empathy, is hotly debated. In a recent study published in Frontiers in Psychology, the long-term effects of playing violent video games were investigated. This study found that empathy is not blunted by playing such games long-term. (2017-03-08)

Who becomes a hero? It is more than just a personality trait
We tend to think of heroes in terms of a psychological profile: brave, altruistic, strong. But a new study suggests that for at least one kind of heroism, it takes a village to save a life. (2018-03-26)

Does sexual aggression alter the female brain?
Thirty percent of women worldwide experience some kind of physical or sexual assault during their lifetime. In a recent animal study, Rutgers scientists -- who have developed a new model to determine how stress affects females -- discovered that prepubescent female rodents paired with sexually experienced males had elevated levels of stress hormones, could not learn as well, and expressed reduced maternal behaviors needed to care for offspring. (2016-02-19)

Chapman Perelman Foundation domestic violence gift awarded to Columbia Psychiatry
The Chapman Perelman Foundation has contributed $1 million to Columbia University Medical Center's Department of Psychiatry to expand an initiative that provides mental health services to victims of domestic violence. (2017-01-18)

Adolescents' values can serve as a buffer against behaving violently at school
A study conducted among Arab and Jewish adolescents in public schools in Israel found that certain values helped protect teens against behaving violently. Surveys among 907 students examined how 10 different values related to violent behavior. Teens who valued universalism reported less violent behavior than their peers. Those who valued power reported more violent behavior. In high-risk environments, programs might be used to promote universalistic values over power values. (2008-05-15)

Nursing science could help reduce firearm violence and its impact
Firearm violence is a significant public health problem worldwide. In the United States, firearms are used to kill almost 100 people daily. Yet despite the staggering impact of firearm violence, there is limited research directed at preventing or addressing its impact on individuals, families and communities. (2018-11-09)

Is firearm violence greater among the mentally ill?
A new study finds that the majority of mental health professionals believe firearm safety issues are greater among mentally ill people, yet they do not screen their clients for firearms or provide firearm safety counseling. The public and politicians have unrealistic expectations for mental health professionals' ability to determine which patients are likely to be involved in firearm violence in the future, according to a study published in the journal Violence and Gender. (2016-06-09)

Preventing murder by addressing domestic violence
Victims of domestic violence are at a high risk to be murdered -- or a victim of attempted murder -- according to a Cuyahoga County task force of criminal-justice professionals, victim advocates and researchers working to prevent domestic violence and homicides. (2018-05-21)

Weaponized shame
'Beyond Bullying' weaves research from the fields of psychology, sociology, economics, and history to create a single overarching theory of shame, offering a window into disturbing aspects of human behavior. (2015-11-03)

Join forces to reduce US violence, says UK expert
Violence in the US can be reduced if police and health agencies join forces, says a leading UK expert. (2017-03-30)

Hidden impacts of sand extraction and trade
The increasing demand for sand in building infrastructure is prompting a range of environmental and social issues that must be addressed, Aurora Torres et al. stress in this Perspective, highlighting the role that science has in finding sustainable solutions. (2017-09-07)

Psychosocial factors, psychological disorders and violent crime
A low level of education is the variable that can most accurately predict this, according to a study carried out among inmates of Andalusian prisons. On the other hand, other classic factors, like alcoholism or personality disorders, do not appear in the equation that best predicts violent crimes. (2017-10-03)

Assaults spiked on Trump rally days during 2016 election
Cities experienced 2.3 more assaults than average on days when hosting presidential campaign rallies for Donald Trump during the lead-up to the 2016 United States Presidential Election, according to a first of its kind study published today in Epidemiology by researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Hillary Clinton rallies were not linked to any increase in assaults. (2018-03-16)

Child abuse and neglect linked to gender inequality
Children growing up in societies that experience high levels of gender inequality -- irrespective of whether these are developed or developing countries -- are more likely to be maltreated. This is according to a cross-national analysis of data from 57 countries worldwide, conducted by Joanne Klevens and Katie Ports of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US. The results are published in Springer's Journal of Family Violence. (2017-07-27)

Psychedelic drug use associated with reduced partner violence in men
In a new study published in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, researchers from UBC's Okanagan campus have discovered that men who have used psychedelic drugs in the past have a lower likelihood of engaging in violence against their intimate partners. (2018-06-05)

Educational success curbs effects of child abuse, neglect
The emotional and sexual abuse that some children endure can lead them to commit crimes later in life. (2018-03-14)

Bullying makes men leave the labor market
Men and women are almost at an equal risk of being bullied in the workplace, but whereas bullying often causes women to go on prolonged sick leave or use antidepressants, men often choose to leave the labor market altogether for a period of time. (2016-12-12)

Suicide risk increases in teens who knew murder victims
Nearly half of black teenagers surveyed in Allegheny County report losing a friend or family member to murder, a disproportionately stark statistic that is associated with suicide attempts and other negative childhood experiences. (2018-11-13)

Social work professor's domestic violence project wins major national award
A project which aims to prevent domestic violence in the Caribbean has won a national award for public engagement. The EU funded None-in-Three project, directed by the University of Huddersfield's Professor Adele Jones, was one of three projects shortlisted for the Health & Wellbeing award, in the Engage Competition run by the National Co-ordinating Centre for Public Engagement (NCCPE). (2016-12-07)

How can colleges better predict when a person's radical beliefs will turn to violence?
In a new study researchers reviewed numerous cases of extremist violence or terrorism and the published literature to develop a set of tools for colleges to use to assess the risk and reduce the potential for acts of violent extremism. (2017-12-05)

When it comes to school recess, a quality playground experience matters
Playground safety, access to play equipment, peer conflict resolution and quality engagement between adults and students are among the factors that contribute to a quality recess experience, new research from Oregon State University shows. (2018-06-04)

Back-to-school worries for parents? 1 in 3 very concerned bullying, cyberbullying
What parents are most worried about as their children prepare to head back to school. (2017-08-21)

New research suggests how parents protect children from the long-term effects of stress
When young children experience violence or poverty, the effect can last well into adulthood. But new research from the Emory School of Medicine suggests that a strong parental relationship could override some of these effects, by changing how children perceive the environmental cues that help them distinguish between what's safe or dangerous. (2018-12-13)

Decriminalizing prostitution could reduce sexual violence and STD transmission
A new study published in the Review of Economic Studies finds that Rhode Island's 6-year prostitution decriminalization policy increased the size of the sex market, but it also appears that during this period both rape offenses and female gonorrhea incidence declined dramatically. (2017-12-20)

Systemic racism needs more examination related to health, says UofL researcher
Although the discipline of public health has recently recognized racism as a social determinant of health, little research examines the issue related to systems and structures. (2018-06-07)

Teen dating violence is down, but boys still report more violence than girls
When it comes to teen dating violence, boys are more likely to report being the victim of violence -- being hit, slapped, or pushed--than girls. That's the surprising finding of new research from the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University. (2018-08-29)

AI systems shed light on root cause of religious conflict
Artificial intelligence can help us to better understand the causes of religious violence and to potentially control it, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. The study published in The Journal for Artificial Societies and Social Stimulation, combined computer modelling and cognitive psychology to create an AI system able to mimic human religiosity, allowing them to better understand the conditions, triggers and patterns for religious violence. (2018-10-30)

Bullying based on stigma has especially damaging effects
In a new study, two professors are looking at bullying based on stigma -- where one is treated unfairly or unjustly due to one's race, sexual orientation, gender, or other characteristic -- and examining the methods used to prevent this type of bullying and address it when it happens. (2018-03-08)

Minorities' homicide victimization rates fall significantly compared to whites'
A new study reveals that while homicide victimization rates declined for whites, blacks, and Hispanics in the United States from 1990-2010, the drop was much more precipitous for the two minority groups. (2016-03-31)

Trauma from parents' youth linked to poorer health, asthma in their own children
A Drexel University study found that for each type of adverse childhood experience a parent went through, their children had 19 percent higher odds of poorer health. (2018-06-04)

Perpetrators of genocide say they're 'good people'
The men who were tried for their role in the 1994 Rwandan genocide that killed up to 1 million people want you to know that they're actually very good people. That's the most common way accused men try to account for their actions in testimony before the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, a new study has found. (2017-10-05)

Handgun purchaser licensing laws linked to fewer firearm homicides in large, urban areas
State laws that require gun purchasers to obtain a license contingent on passing a background check performed by state or local law enforcement are associated with a 14 percent reduction in firearm homicides in large, urban counties. (2018-05-31)

New Penn research examines gun use, injury and fear in domestic violence
About 2 percent of domestic-violence incidents involve guns, according to new research from Susan B. Sorenson of the University of Pennsylvania. Victims of these crimes typically have fewer injuries but more fear. These findings come as part of her latest work, which looks at how frequently guns and other weapon types appear in domestic-violence incidents. (2017-02-17)

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