Popular Virginia Tech News and Current Events

Popular Virginia Tech News and Current Events, Virginia Tech News Articles.
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Electric cloth
Evening gowns with interwoven LEDs may look extravagant, but the light sources need a constant power supply from devices that are as well wearable, durable, and lightweight. Chinese scientists have manufactured fibrous electrodes for wearable devices that are flexible and excel by their high energy density. A microfluidic technology was key for the preparation of the electrode material was a microfluidic technology, as shown in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2019-10-18)

Virginia Tech researchers lead breakthrough in quantum computing
A team of Virginia Tech chemistry and physics researchers have advanced quantum simulation by devising an algorithm that can more efficiently calculate the properties of molecules on a noisy quantum computer. (2019-07-25)

Keep calm and carry on: VTCRI scientists make first serotonin measurements in humans
Scientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have begun to unravel how serotonin acts, based on data collected in a first-of-its-kind experiment that utilized electrochemical probes implanted into the brain of awake human beings. (2018-04-30)

In Antarctic dry valleys, early signs of climate change-induced shifts in soil
In a study spanning two decades, a team of researchers found declining numbers of soil fauna, nematodes and other animal species in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, one of the world's driest and coldest deserts. (2018-01-05)

New study finds employee incentives can lead to unethical behavior in the workplace
Findings suggest that setting compensation goals can increase dishonesty when managers are also paid a bonus for hitting certain targets. (2018-12-11)

Keeping an eye on the health of structures
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) used synthetic-aperture radar data from four different satellites, combined with statistical methods, to determine the structural deformation patterns of the largest bridge in Iran. (2018-04-12)

Submerged aquatic vegetation return is sentinel of Chesapeake Bay ecosystem recovery
A new research article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzes the positive impact of long-term nutrient reductions on an important and valuable ecosystem in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists indicate the resurgence of underwater grasses supports nutrient reductions from EPA's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) along with conservation incentives have resulted in a healthier Chesapeake Bay. (2018-03-05)

Temperature may affect pollen color
While studies on flowers' petal-color variation abound, new research looks at differences in the performance of pollen under varied environmental conditions based on its color. (2018-01-05)

Weight before pregnancy linked with children's neurodevelopment
A recent Obesity Reviews analysis of published studies found that, compared with children of normal weight mothers, children whose mothers were overweight or obese prior to pregnancy had 17% percent and 51 percent increased risks for compromised neurodevelopmental outcomes, respectively. (2017-11-22)

Digital addiction increases loneliness, anxiety and depression
A new study by two San Francisco State University professors of health education finds that smartphone use can be similar to other types of substance use. (2018-04-11)

Entomologist discovers millipede that comes in more color combinations than any other
The thumb-sized millipede that crawls around the forest floor of Southwest Virginia's Cumberland Mountains has more color combinations than any other millipede discovered. (2018-01-26)

New expert findings seek to protect national parks from invasive animal species
'We value national parks for the natural habitats and wildlife they protect, but because of invasive species, some of our native species are struggling or unable to survive, even with the protection of our park system,' says Virginia Tech wildlife conservation expert Ashley Dayer. (2019-12-03)

Decade of fossil collecting gives new perspective on Triassic period, emergence of dinosaurs
A project spanning countries, years and institutions has attempted to reconstruct what the southern end of the world looked like during the Triassic period, 252 to 199 million years ago. (2018-03-28)

Scalpel-free surgery enhances quality of life for Parkinson's patients, study finds
A high-tech form of brain surgery that replaces scalpels with sound waves improved quality of life for people with Parkinson's disease that has resisted other forms of treatment, a new study has found. (2018-11-09)

Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistors
A nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and protects the organic semiconductor - which had previously been vulnerable to damage from the ambient environment. (2018-01-12)

Smartly containing the cloud increases computing efficiency, says first-of-its-kind study
Virginia Tech researchers discovered ways to further improve computing efficiency using management tools for cloud-based light-weight virtual machine replacements called containers. (2018-02-06)

Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films. (2018-01-05)

Wildlife researchers identify impacts of contamination in amphibians
Researchers from different insititutions working together at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and in the field have demonstrated that amphibians are exposed to contaminants through maternal transfer, as has been proven for other vertebrates. (2006-02-21)

Efforts to revive coal industry unlikely to work, may slow job growth
Current federal efforts to revive the coal industry will likely do more harm than good to fragile Appalachian communities transitioning from coal as a major source of employment, according to a study conducted by Indiana University researchers. (2017-10-27)

Mere expectation of checking work email after hours harms health of workers and families
The study demonstrates that employees do not need to spend actual time on work in their off-hours to experience harmful effects. The mere expectations of availability increase strain for employees and their significant others -- even when employees do not engage in actual work during nonwork time. (2018-08-10)

Study: Retaining talent is paramount for successful firm acquisitions
A recent UT Dallas study found that when acquiring firms avoid the exodus of scientists from the target firms, their likelihood of creating highly impactful knowledge increases. (2018-03-05)

Heart attacks, heart failure, stroke: COVID-19's dangerous cardiovascular complications
A new guide from emergency medicine doctors details the potentially deadly cardiovascular complications COVID-19 can cause. (2020-05-15)

Physicists and engineers search for new dimension
Researchers in the Department of Physics and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech are exploring the possibility of an extra dimension -- an imperceptibly small dimension, about one billionth of a nanometer. (2008-03-10)

Human-centered design is key to forming partnerships for large-scale conservation success
The findings, published in PLOS ONE on March 9, question previous assumptions in the field that the payments themselves are the most effective motivator of participation. (2018-03-29)

Monocrystalline silicon thin film for cost-cutting solar cells with 10-times faster growth rate fabricated
A research team from Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Waseda University have successfully produced high-quality thin film monocrystalline silicon with a reduced crystal defect density down to the silicon wafer level at a growth rate that is more than 10 times higher than before. In principle, this method can improve the raw material yield to nearly 100%. (2018-03-16)

How a moon slows the decay of Pluto's atmosphere
A new study from the Georgia Institute of Technology provides additional insight into relationship between Pluto and its moon, Charon, and how it affects the continuous stripping of Pluto's atmosphere by solar wind. When Charon is positioned between the sun and Pluto, the research indicates that the moon can significantly reduce atmospheric loss. (2017-01-09)

Mosquitoes remember human smells, but also swats, researchers find
A Virginia Tech study shows that mosquitoes can rapidly learn and remember the smells of hosts and that dopamine is a key mediator of this process. The study proved a mosquito's preference can shift if that person's smell is associated with an unpleasant sensation. (2018-01-25)

A fast reactor system to shorten the lifetime of long-lived fission products
Researchers in Japan have proposed a more efficient method to reduce radioactive waste. The study involves converting radioactive material into short-lived nuclides by absorbing surplus neutrons in the core peripheral portion of a small fast reactor faster than they are generated in the core, thus providing an effective way to lessen the burden of nuclear waste on future generations. (2017-11-14)

Researchers join forces to improve life for children with genetic disorder
The achievements of three girls who received intensive therapy through the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute's Neuromotor Research Clinic based on innovative pediatric neurorehabilitation research have been documented in a report published in BMC Research Notes. (2018-03-16)

Personal outreach to landowners is vital to conservation program success
Research published in PLOS ONE shows that private landowners trust conservation agencies more and have better views of program outcomes when they accompany conservation biologists who are monitoring habitat management on their land. (2018-04-04)

Meditation could help anxiety and cardiovascular health
In a student-led study, one hour of mindfulness meditation shown to reduce anxiety and some cardiovascular risk markers. (2018-04-20)

Extending food safety training to other countries could save live
Food safety practices that Americans take for granted -- washing hands with soap, refrigeration, and not cutting raw meat and vegetables on the same surface without disinfection -- are not widely practiced in other places around the world, and researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences want to change that. (2017-12-15)

Hospital ownership of practice may reduce physician burnout
Among staff in small- to medium-sized primary care practices, hospital ownership is associated with positive perceptions of work environment and lower burnout. (2018-04-09)

Shakedown in Oklahoma: To cut the number of bigger earthquakes, inject less saltwater
In Oklahoma, reducing the amount of saltwater (highly brackish water produced during oil and gas recovery) pumped into the ground seems to be decreasing the number of small fluid-triggered earthquakes. But a new study shows why it wasn't enough to ease bigger earthquakes. The study, led by Ryan M. Pollyea of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., was published online ahead of print in Geology this week. (2018-01-04)

Ornithologists announce discovery of new bird species
The announcement of the discovery of a new bird comes with a twist: It's a white-eye, but its eye isn't white. Still, what this new bird lacks in literal qualities it makes up for as one of the surprises that nature still has tucked away in little-explored corners of the world. Ornithologists, including one from Michigan State University, describe for science a new species of bird from the Togian Islands of Indonesia -- Zosterops somadikartai, or Togian white-eye. (2008-03-13)

Fire ants are emerging nuisance for Virginians
Red imported fire ants, which have caused trouble in Florida and Texas for decades, are advancing in Virginia. Virginia Tech scientists are trying to learn more about the increasing number of fire ant infestations. (2007-05-24)

Discovering potential therapeutic protein inhibitors for Chagas disease
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), Nagasaki University have identified four potential protein inhibitors and unlocked drug discovery strategies for the treatment of Chagas disease by using advanced three-dimensional computer simulation by supercomputer TSUBAME in combination with in vitro experiments and X-ray crystallography. Through this (2017-09-26)

Virginia Tech entomologist discovers invertebrate that comes in more color combinations than any oth
The thumb-sized millipede that crawls around the forest floor of Southwest Virginia's Cumberland Mountains has more color combinations than any other millipede discovered. (2017-12-04)

How will environmental changes affect western Greenland?
Thirty-one miles north of the Arctic Circle lies Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. It is one of the most studied regions in the Arctic. To highlight environmental change and impacts in the Kangerlussuaq area, Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research (AAAR),'has released a special issue, to examine how past, present and future climate impacts may affect this landscape. Three of the 10 articles feature lead authors, who are alumni of the Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) at Dartmouth. (2018-04-06)

Student research team accelerates snow melt with 'Melt Mat'
'The idea for a thermal absorptive blanket is novel, but also very practical,' said Jonathan Boreyko, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering and mechanics and the team's faculty advisor. 'For novelty's sake, the team really needed to go for a journal publication. For practicality's sake, we went for a patent.' (2018-02-15)

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