Popular Vision News and Current Events

Popular Vision News and Current Events, Vision News Articles.
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A simulator allows patients to experiment how their vision will improve before surgery
For the first time, patients will be able to experience how their vision will improve after a cataract surgery just before being operated. Thanks to a new wearable visual simulator developed by scientists from the National Research Council (CSIC), patients and surgeons are able to see the effects of an intraocular multifocal lens -- which allows seeing at different distances -- in a realistic way before being implanted. (2019-02-07)

Buzzkill?
They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight. New research from UC Riverside finds male honeybees inject toxins during sex that cause temporary blindness. (2019-09-10)

Neurons that regenerate, neurons that die
In a new study published in Neuron, investigators report on a transcription factor that they have found that can help certain neurons regenerate, while simultaneously killing others. (2017-06-21)

New test may quickly identify mild traumatic brain injury with underlying brain damage
A new test using peripheral vision reaction time could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as a concussion. (2017-02-16)

Deep-sea fish reveals twilight trick
A new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish, and scientists say the discovery opens a new world of understanding about vision in a variety of light conditions. University of Queensland scientists found the new cell type in the deep-sea pearlside fish (Maurolicus spp.), which have an unusual visual system adapted for twilight conditions. (2017-11-08)

Thin to win
University of Utah electrical and computer engineering researchers have developed a new kind of optical lens that is much thinner and lighter than conventional camera lenses that also works with night imaging, a future boon for smartphones that could flatten those unsightly 'camera bumps' as well as for drones and night vision cameras for soldiers. (2019-10-08)

Pong paddles and perception: Our actions influence what we see
Most people think of vision as simply a function of information the eye gathers. For cognitive psychologist Jessica Witt, vision is a little more complicated than that. She has a new paper that faces head-on the notion that her experimental subjects have been victims of a psychological phenomenon called response bias. She employed a classic, action-specific experiment involving a video game familiar to children of the 80s: Pong. (2018-01-03)

Zooming into cilia sheds light into blinding diseases
A new study reveals an unprecedented close-up view of cilia linked to blindness. (2019-11-05)

Annoyed by floating specks in your vision? You may soon be able to zap them away
Millions of people who put up with seeing annoying specks drift through their field of vision may now have a safe, high-tech solution to their problem. A study of patients who had laser treatment to vaporize these flecks and spots known as floaters, showed a very low complication rate, according to research presented today at AAO 2017, the 121st Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. (2017-11-13)

The 3-D selfie has arrived
Computer scientists at the University of Nottingham and Kingston University have solved a complex problem that has, until now, defeated experts in vision and graphics research. They have developed technology capable of producing 3-D facial reconstruction from a single 2-D image -- the 3-D selfie. People are queuing up to try it and so far, more than 400,000 users have had a go. (2017-09-26)

Hearing and visual aids linked to slower age-related memory loss
Hearing aids and cataract surgery are strongly linked to a slower rate of age-related cognitive decline, according to new research by University of Manchester academics. According to Dr. Piers Dawes and Dr. Asri Maharani, cognitive decline -- which affects memory and thinking skills -- is slowed after patient's hearing and sight are improved. (2018-10-11)

Retraining the brain to see after stroke
A new study out today in Neurology, provides the first evidence that rigorous visual training restores rudimentary sight in patients who went partially blind after suffering a stroke, while patients who did not train continued to get progressively worse. (2017-04-12)

Honey bees have sharper eyesight than we thought
Research conducted at the University of Adelaide has discovered that bees have much better vision than was previously known, offering new insights into the lives of honey bees, and new opportunities for translating this knowledge into fields such as robot vision. (2017-04-06)

Did eating dark chocolate improve vision?
A small study found slight improvement in vision after eating dark chocolate. (2018-04-26)

Animals have it all over us when it comes to color
University of Queensland researchers have developed new knowledge on how animals see and use color, and how their color vision has evolved. The Queensland Brain Institute's Professor Justin Marshall, co-author of a study undertaken with international colleagues, said color had an important role in reproduction and prey-predator interactions, although it served diverse functions in various animals. (2017-08-03)

UC biologists peek into the past to see the future through tiny spider eyes
Biologists at UC look to the past for early genetic development of tiny spider and insect eyes to find potential for research into human visual challenges. (2018-01-11)

Retina transplants show promise in patients with retinal degeneration
Preliminary research shows encouraging results with transplantation of retinal cells in patients with blindness caused by retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration, according to a report in the August issue of American Journal of Ophthalmology. (2008-07-10)

Researchers increase understanding of coarse-to-fine human visual perception
In a recent study published in Neuron, Dr. WANG Wei's lab at the Institute of Neuroscience of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed an unexpected neural clustering preserving visual acuity from V1 into V4, enabling the spatiotemporal separation of processing local and global features along the hierarchy. The study for the first time showed an unexpected compartmentation of area V4 into SF-selective functional domains that extend to high visual acuity. (2018-03-29)

Color vision variation in guppies influences female mate preference
A variety of animals have male-specific ornament traits and these ornaments are favored by female choice. Which male traits are preferred by females often varies among females. Genetic mechanisms that create and maintain variations in female preference has been one of the central questions in evolutionary ecology. (2018-11-19)

Myth Debunked that OCD Is Associated With Superior Intelligence
The researchers conducted a meta-analysis of all the available literature on IQ in OCD samples versus non-psychiatric controls (98 studies), and found that contrary to the prevailing myth, OCD is not associated with superior IQ, but with normative IQ that is slightly lower compared to control samples. The authors suggested that the small reduction in IQ scores in OCD sufferers may be largely attributed to OCD-related slowness and not to intellectual ability. (2017-09-18)

Quality cancer care: Not just a matter of anti-cancer medicines
ESMO, the leading professional organisation for medical oncology, shares concerns expressed in a scientific paper and reflected in the international media about the rising costs of cancer medicines. (2018-04-26)

Age-related macular degeneration before and after the era of anti-VEGF drugs
In a study of nearly 650 people with the eye disease age-related macular degeneration (AMD), half still had vision 20/40 or better, typically good enough to drive or to read standard print, after five years of treatment with anti-VEGF drugs that are injected into the eye. The authors of the study, funded by the National Eye Institute (NEI) at the National Institutes of Health, say those outcomes would have been unimaginable about 10 years ago, prior to the drugs' availability. (2016-05-02)

More bad news for artificial sweetener users according to Ben-Gurion University researchers
The collaborative study indicated relative toxicity of six artificial sweeteners (aspartame, sucralose, saccharine, neotame, advantame, and acesulfame potassium-k) and 10 sport supplements containing these artificial sweeteners. The bacteria found in the digestive system became toxic when exposed to concentrations of only one mg./ml. of the artificial sweeteners. (2018-10-01)

Going the distance: Brain cells for 3D vision discovered
Scientists at Newcastle University have discovered neurons in insect brains that compute 3D distance and direction. Understanding these could help vision in robots. (2019-06-28)

Poor anti-VEGF responses linked to genetic variation in immune regulation
Though reducing VEGF signaling with anti-VEGF therapies has positive effects in many patients with wet age-related macular degeneration, some individuals continue to experience vision deterioration during treatment. In a study published this week in the JCI, Martin Friedlander's lab at Scripps Research Institute investigated whether genetic variation in an immune system component called the complement system may contribute to vision loss during anti-VEGF therapy in some patients. (2016-12-05)

$5.1 million grant will fund research to develop a stem cell-based therapy for blinding eye condition
Scientists at the UCLA Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research and the Stein Eye Institute have been awarded a $5.1 million grant from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine to advance the development of a novel therapy for blinding retinal conditions. (2018-10-18)

Older adults with small social networks less likely to get cataract surgery
A new study by University of Michigan Kellogg Ey Center links familial relationships to the likelihood older adults will get needed cataract surgery -- a procedure with broad implications for health. (2018-03-09)

New RNAi treatment targets eye inflammation
Scientists have developed a new RNA interference (RNAi) therapeutic agent that safely blocked ocular inflammation in mice, potentially making it a new treatment for human uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. (2017-02-13)

NBA teams that come from behind don't garner more overtime wins -- Ben-Gurion U. Research
'People talk about momentum as an indicator for success in business, sports and politics,' says Dr. Elia Morgulev from the BGU Department of Management, Guilford Glazer Faculty of Business and Management. 'However, after studying close to 900 tied games with fourth quarter comebacks over 11 National Basketball Association seasons, we found that regardless of momentum, teams with the home advantage and more season wins were more likely to succeed in the five-minute overtime.' (2019-01-02)

Toward precision medicine: First comprehensive look at human retinal cell diversity
In work that brings researchers closer to the goal of precision medicine approaches to treating glaucoma and other neurodegenerative vision diseases, a new IUPUI study has, for the first time, been able to identify a wide variety of previously unknown cell subtypes in the human eye. (2018-03-22)

The eye is not immune to immunity
Contrary to long-established dogma, the eye can host an active immune response that could both heal injury and contribute to loss of vision. (2018-01-25)

Study explores how emotions in facial expressions are understood
New research by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) reveals how well fearful facial expressions are perceived in peripheral vision. Although human vision has the highest resolution when we look directly at something, we see a much wider view of the visual world in our lower resolution peripheral vision. In fact, detecting signals of potential danger in our periphery - especially moving ones - is something our visual system is well adapted for. (2018-06-01)

Prism glasses expand the view for patients with hemianopia
Innovative prism glasses can significantly improve the vision and the daily lives of patients with hemianopia, a condition that blinds half the visual field in both eyes. The peripheral prism glasses, which were invented by Dr. Eli Peli, a senior scientist at Schepens Eye Research Institute. (2008-05-12)

University of Iowa researchers use CRISPR engineering to prevent certain glaucoma in mice
A University of Iowa-led team of researchers has used the gene editing method called CRISPR-Cas9 to disrupt a mutant gene that is responsible for some forms of glaucoma, one of the most common causes of irreversible blindness. (2017-10-02)

Ethical issues are important in 'standard-of-care' clinical trials
A learning healthcare system (LHS) aligns science, informatics, incentives, and culture for continuous improvement and innovation, with a delivery process that is based on best practices while also capturing new knowledge. Integral to LHSs are clinical trials that compare interventions that are already commonly in use (as 'accepted' or 'standard-of-care'). (2018-01-10)

Cell phone use and distracted driving begins in the mind
Even simple cell phone conversations can cause distracted driving. Researchers have found listening on the phone while driving creates a lag in the mind to extract itself from one object before fixing attention on another object. Results published in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. (2017-06-05)

New study by Ben-Gurion Univerisity researchers shows female physician bias in ICU admissions
According to the findings, female physicians admitted approximately 20 percent fewer of their female patients to the ICU than did male physicians, and 12 percent fewer female patients than male patients to the intensive cardiac care unit. (2018-02-07)

Stem cells treat macular degeneration
UCSB researchers helped develop a specially engineered retinal patch to treat people with sudden, severe sight loss. (2018-03-19)

Visual impairment, blindness cases in US expected to double by 2050
The number of people with visual impairment or blindness in the United States is expected to double to more than 8 million by 2050, according to projections based on the most recent census data and from studies funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. Another 16.4 million Americans are expected to have difficulty seeing due to uncorrected refractive errors. (2016-05-19)

Improving longevity of functionally integrated stem cells in regenerative vision therapy
One of the challenges in developing stem cell therapies is ensuring that transplanted cells can survive long enough to work. Buck Institute researchers report one of the first demonstrations of long-term vision restoration in blind mice by transplanting photoreceptors derived from human stem cells and blocking the immune response that causes transplanted cells to be rejected. The findings support a path to improving clinical applications in restoring human vision lost to degenerative eye diseases. (2017-01-12)

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