Popular Volcanic Ash News and Current Events

Popular Volcanic Ash News and Current Events, Volcanic Ash News Articles.
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JAK inhibitors associated with aggressive lymphoma
Austrian researchers have discovered that a small number of patients taking targeted drugs known as Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors to treat myelofibrosis may develop aggressive lymphomas. (2018-06-15)

Older than the moon
Geochemist Matt Jackson finds that only the hottest, most buoyant mantle plumes draw from a primordial reservoir deep in the Earth. (2017-02-06)

Sources and sinks
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. But Earth has been ice-free for about 75 percent of the time since complex life first appeared. This variation in background climate, between partly glaciated and ice-free, has puzzled geologists for decades. (2019-03-14)

Wood ash recycling program could help save Muskoka's forests and lakes
Implementing a new residential wood ash recycling program to restore calcium levels in Muskoka's forest soils and lakes could help replenish the area's dwindling supply of crayfish and maple sap, according to new research co-led by York University. (2019-03-28)

Ashes to concrete
Drexel University researchers have developed a process for turning the solid waste products of coal power plants into a useful ingredient that could improve properties of concrete. (2019-10-29)

Earth's core and mantle separated in a disorderly fashion
Plumes of hot rock surging upward from the Earth's mantle at volcanic hotspots contain evidence that the Earth's formative years may have been even more chaotic than previously thought, according to new work from a team of Carnegie and Smithsonian scientists published in Nature. (2018-01-24)

WSU researchers use coal waste to create sustainable concrete
Washington State University researchers have created a sustainable alternative to traditional concrete using coal fly ash, a waste product of coal-based electricity generation. (2018-07-12)

First evidence of under-ice volcanic eruption in Antarctica
The first evidence of a volcanic eruption from beneath Antarctica's most rapidly changing ice sheet is reported this week in the journal Nature Geosciences. The volcano on the West Antarctic Ice Sheet erupted 2,000 years ago and remains active. Using airborne ice-sounding radar, scientists from British Antarctic Survey discovered a layer of ash produced by a (2008-01-20)

New insight into how magma feeds volcanic eruptions
A novel research study by scientists at the University of Liverpool has provided new insights into how molten rock (magma) moves through the Earth's crust to feed volcanic eruptions. Using laboratory experiments involving water, jelly and laser imaging, researchers were able to demonstrate how magma magma flows through the Earth's crust to the surface through magma-filled cracks called dykes. (2018-02-22)

Ocean floor geysers warm flowing sea water
An international team of earth scientists report movement of warmed sea water through the flat, Pacific Ocean floor off Costa Rica. The movement is greater than that off midocean volcanic ridges. The finding suggests possible marine life in a part of the ocean once considered barren. (2008-09-22)

Another clue for fast motion of the Hawaiian hotspot
Recent studies have suggested that the Hawaiian hotspot moved relatively quickly southward in the period from 60 to about 50 million years ago. This hypothesis is supported by a new study of Kevin Konrad and colleagues. They have evaluated new rock dating of the Rurutu volcanic chain and added data from the Hawaiian-Emperor chain and the Louisville chain. It shows that the Hawaiian-Emperor hotspot displays strong motion between 60 and 48 million years ago. (2018-02-27)

World's largest volcanic range may lurk beneath Antarctic ice
West Antarctica's vast ice sheet conceals what may be the largest volcanic region on earth, research has revealed. (2017-08-14)

Some Chinese coal ash too radioactive for reuse
Many manufacturers use coal ash from power plants as a low-cost binding agent in concrete and other building materials. But a new study finds that coal ash from high-uranium deposits in China is too radioactive for this use. Some coal ash analyzed in the study contained radiation 43 times higher than the maximum safe limit set for residential building materials by the U.N. Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. (2017-11-09)

Large volcanic eruptions in Tropics can trigger El Niño events
Explosive volcanic eruptions in the tropics can lead to El Niño events, those notorious warming periods in the Pacific Ocean with dramatic global impacts on the climate, according to a new study. (2017-10-03)

Western states to host first test of carbon sequestration in lava rock
Along with researchers from three Idaho universities, geologists from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in Idaho Falls will test how well the volcanic rocks abundant below the Columbia and Snake river plains store carbon dioxide. Researchers from INL, the University of Idaho, the Boise State University, the Idaho State University in Pocatello and the Battelle Pacific Northwest Division in Richland, Wash., are now making preparations to inject the gas into the subterranean volcanic basalt rock and monitor whether the rock can hold it. (2005-11-04)

A close-up look at an uncommon underwater eruption
A new paper published Jan. 10, 2018, in the journal Science Advances describes the first up-close investigation of the largest underwater volcanic eruption of the past century. (2018-01-10)

UH research finds evidence of 2 billion years of volcanic activity on Mars
Analysis of a Martian meteorite found in Africa in 2012 has uncovered evidence of at least 2 billion years of volcanic activity on Mars. This confirms that some of the longest-lived volcanoes in the solar system may be found on the Red Planet. (2017-02-01)

Study reshapes understanding of climate change's impact on early societies
A new study linking paleoclimatology -- the reconstruction of past global climates --with historical analysis by researchers at Yale and other institutions shows a link between environmental stress and its impact on the economy, political stability, and war-fighting capacity of ancient Egypt. (2017-10-17)

New study analyzes volcanic fatalities in more detail than ever before
Building on existing information and databases relating to volcanic fatalities, scientists from the University of Bristol have, for the first time, been able to classify victims by activity or occupation and look at the distance of their death from the volcano. (2017-10-06)

Wider coverage of satellite data better detects magma supply to volcanoes
Using satellite imaging, Penn State researchers for the first time identified a major magma supply into a reservoir extending almost two miles from the crater of a volcano in Nicaragua. (2018-03-28)

Permian volcanism contributed to atmospheric greenhouse gas content in Antarctica
The Choiyoi magmatic Province, with an estimated volume of ~1.3 million square kilometers, represents a voluminous Permian subduction-related volcanic episode that has thus far been described only from South America. In their new paper for Lithosphere, Demian Nelson and John Cottle investigated Permian volcaniclastic rocks from central Antarctica to determine the potential magmatic source of volcanic detritus in southwestern Gondwana. (2019-04-02)

Mercury Rising: New evidence that volcanism triggered the late Devonian extinction
The late Devonian extinction, about 370 million years ago, is one of the 'Big Five.' It killed up to 80 percent of species, obliterating the lavish Devonian coral reef ecosystem. The final pulse in this multi-step crisis, called the Frasnian-Famennian event, was its most devastating. But what, exactly, did the killing? (2018-05-01)

Study opens new questions on how the atmosphere and oceans formed
A new study led by The Australian National University has found seawater cycles throughout the Earth's interior down to 2,900km, much deeper than previously thought, reopening questions about how the atmosphere and oceans formed. (2017-02-27)

Detecting volcanic eruptions
Geophysicist Robin Matoza leads a case study of an eruption of Calbuco in Chile to evaluate data delivered by infrasound sensors (2018-03-29)

1,800 years of global ocean cooling halted by global warming
Prior to the advent of human-caused global warming in the 19th century, the surface layer of Earth's oceans had undergone 1,800 years of a steady cooling trend, according to a new study in the Aug. 17, 2015 issue of the journal Nature Geoscience. The results also indicate that the coolest temperatures occurred during the Little Ice Age -- a period that spanned the 16th through 18th centuries and was known for cooler average temperatures over land. (2015-08-17)

Fossil footprints challenge established theories of human evolution
Newly discovered human-like footprints from Crete may put the established narrative of early human evolution to the test. The footprints are approximately 5.7 million years old and were made at a time when previous research puts our ancestors in Africa -- with ape-like feet. (2017-08-31)

Farming fish alter 'cropping' strategies under high CO2
Fish that 'farm' their own patches of seaweed alter their 'cropping' practices under high CO2 conditions, researchers at the University of Adelaide in Australia have found. (2018-07-09)

Jelawat not seen as a threat to the Philippines
Tropical Depression Jelawat, a newly formed tropical cyclone over Western Micronesia is expected to strengthen into a Tropical Storm and enter the southeastern border of the Philippines by this afternoon (March 26). (2018-03-26)

Shifting shorelines at Lake Tahoe caused by ancient lava dams
Pleistocene basaltic lavas form a small volcanic field that was erupted from seven vents in the northwestern Lake Tahoe basin. Most of these lavas were erupted above the water and produced lava flows that dammed the lake outlet and flowed into an early Lake Tahoe. The resulting steam explosions produced deltas composed of fragmental deposits as well as pillow lavas. (2018-02-13)

Unusual climate during Roman times plunged Eurasia into hunger and disease
A recent study published in an esteemed academic journal indicates that volcanic eruptions in the mid 500s resulted in an unusually gloomy and cold period. (2018-04-11)

Hot climate could shut down plate tectonics
A new study of possible links between climate and geophysics finds that a much hotter climate could shut down the Earth's plate tectonics. While human-induced climate change couldn't generate the needed heat, volcanic activity or changes in the sun's luminosity could. The research, which is available online in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, may help explain why Venus swelters beneath a thick blanket of heat-trapping carbon dioxide. (2008-05-12)

Cool idea: Magma held in 'cold storage' before giant volcano eruption
Long Valley, California, has long defined the 'super-eruption.' About 765,000 years ago, a pool of molten rock exploded into the sky. Within one nightmarish week, 760 cubic kilometers of lava and ash spewed out in the kind of volcanic cataclysm we hope never to witness. A new study shows that the giant body of magma -- molten rock -- at Long Valley was much cooler before the eruption than previously thought. (2017-11-06)

Study provides new clues to leukemia resurgence after chemotherapy
For the first time, researchers have discovered that some leukemia cells harvest energy resources from normal cells during chemotherapy, helping the cancer cells not only to survive, but actually thrive, after treatment. The study is published online today in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology. (2016-06-02)

Charred flowers and the fossil record
One of the main types of fossil used to understand the first flowering plants (angiosperms) are charred flowers. These charcoals were produced in ancient wildfires, and they provide some evidence for the types of plants that grew millions of years ago. However, when fires burn they not only produce charcoal, but they also destroy it. (2017-06-13)

Foot-dragging Mars rover finds Yellowstone-like hot spring deposits
A mineral-scouting camera designed at ASU pointed scientists toward an ancient Martian hydrothermal system like those in Yellowstone National Park. (2008-05-22)

NASA's CATS concludes successful mission on space station
A spaceborne lidar instrument that fired more laser pulses than any previous orbiting instrument has ended its operations on the International Space Station, after a successful 33-month mission to measure clouds and tiny atmospheric particles that play key roles in Earth's climate and weather. (2017-12-06)

Volcanic crystals give a new view of magma
Volcanologists are gaining a new understanding of what's going on inside the magma reservoir that lies below an active volcano and they're finding a colder, more solid place than previously thought, according to new research published June 16 in the journal Science. (2017-06-15)

Precursors of a catastrophic collapse
The flanks of many island volcanoes slide very slowly towards the sea. Whether these landslides are forewarnings of a catastrophic collapse or, on the contrary, even reduce its risk, is not yet understood. Geophysicists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel have now published a study in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, which shows that sporadic, slow landslides on the small volcanic island of Ritter Island in New Guinea preceded a catastrophic collapse. (2019-05-16)

Plant fossils provide new insight into the uplift history of SE Tibet
Plenty of well-preserved plant fossils with well constrained geological ages were discovered from Markam Basin in SE Tibetan Plateau. Fossils from different layers are different in floristic components and leaf sizes, they evidenced the uplift to present elevation during the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (33.9 Ma). Moreover, these fossils suggest that the modernization of highly diverse Asian biota nowadays took place before the E-O transition, not Neogene as previous thought. (2018-06-29)

UTA researcher participates in Nature paper on early human survival
UTA researcher Naomi Cleghorn has participated in a Nature paper that describes how humans thrived in South Africa through the Toba volcanic eruption about 74,000 years ago, which created a decades-long volcanic winter. (2018-04-25)

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