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Popular Water Quality News and Current Events, Water Quality News Articles.
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Researchers discover greenhouse bypass for nitrogen
An international team discovers that production of a potent greenhouse gas can be bypassed as soil nitrogen breaks down into unreactive atmospheric N2. (2017-01-18)
Microengineered slippery rough surface for water harvesting from air
A slippery rough surface (SRS) inspired by both pitcher plants and rice leaves outperforms state-of-the-art liquid-repellent surfaces in water harvesting applications, according to a team of researchers at Penn State and the University of Texas at Dallas. (2018-03-30)
Researchers develop model to show how bacteria grow in plumbing systems
Bacteria in tap water can multiply when a faucet isn't used for a few days, such as when a house is vacant over a week's vacation, a new study from University of Illinois engineers found. (2018-03-29)
An effective way to eliminate atrazine and its by-products in surface water
Atrazine, widely used as a weedkiller, is known to have harmful effects on aquatic wildlife and presents a risk to human health by altering the action of certain hormones. (2017-09-18)
When birds of a feather poop together
Algal blooms deplete oxygen in lakes, produce toxins, and end up killing aquatic life in the lake. (2017-05-17)
Exposure to common THM levels in drinking water not associated with breast cancer
Exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs) in residential water is not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. (2018-02-26)
Climate change study finds New Hampshire's warmer weather will bring warmer streams
Air temperature increases from climate change will make New Hampshire's streams warmer, according to Dartmouth-led research published in 'Freshwater Biology.' The study examined the extent to which stream waters are warming, which has implications for freshwater ecosystems across the nation given that many species depend on cold water to survive. (2018-04-30)
Northern lakes respond differently to nitrogen deposition
Nitrogen deposition caused by human activities can lead to an increased phytoplankton production in boreal lakes. (2017-02-06)
A solar cell you can put in the wash
Scientists from RIKEN and the University of Tokyo have developed a new type of ultra-thin photovoltaic device, coated on both sides with stretchable and waterproof films, which can continue to provide electricity from sunlight even after being soaked in water or being stretched and compressed. (2017-09-18)
Database shows effects of acid rain on microorganisms in Adirondack Lakes
Researchers have long known that acid rain can severely decrease the diversity of plant and animal communities in fresh water lakes and ponds. (2008-06-23)
Solar cells more efficient thanks to new material standing on edge
Researchers from Lund University in Sweden and from Fudan University in China have successfully designed a new structural organization using the promising solar cell material perovskite. (2017-05-23)
Study quantifies effect of 'legacy phosphorus' in reduced water quality
For decades, phosphorous has accumulated in Wisconsin soils. Though farmers have taken steps to reduce the quantity of the agricultural nutrient applied to and running off their fields, a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveals that a 'legacy' of abundant soil phosphorus in the Yahara watershed of Southern Wisconsin has a large, direct and long-lasting impact on water quality. (2017-03-14)
Understanding the strange behavior of water
The properties of water have fascinated scientists for centuries, but yet its unique behavior remains a mystery. (2018-03-27)
Mediterranean diet may improve academic performance by affecting sleep
A new Acta Paediatrica study indicates that following the Mediterranean diet may improve adolescents' academic performance, and the effect may relate to sleep quality. (2018-07-18)
Removing heavy metals from water
EPFL chemists have developed a new material that can remove heavy metals from water and make it drinkable in seconds. (2018-03-14)
Water, water, nowhere
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have found that the unusual properties of graphane -- a two-dimensional polymer of carbon and hydrogen -- could form a type of anhydrous 'bucket brigade' that transports protons without the need for water, potentially leading to the development of more efficient hydrogen fuel cells for vehicles and other energy systems. (2017-05-04)
Harmful algal blooms and water quality
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur naturally, but their outbreaks are influenced by climate change and droughts, nutrient enrichment and manmade factors, such as contaminants from sewage and stormwater discharge, natural resource extraction or agricultural runoff, to name a few. (2015-12-22)
Thorium reactors may dispose of enormous amounts of weapons-grade plutonium
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University are developing a new technology for multipurpose application of large amounts of weapons-grade plutonium accumulated in Russia and across the world. (2018-01-19)
Archaeologists trace early irrigation farming in ancient Yemen
In Yemen, new evidence of ancient transitions from hunting and herding to irrigation agriculture have been found. (2008-07-16)
Women who get frequent UTIs may reduce risk by drinking plenty of water
Women who suffer from recurrent urinary tract infections may reduce their risk by drinking more water, according to an IDWeek 2017 study. (2017-10-05)
'Dancing' holes in droplets submerged in water-ethanol mixtures
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have observed the formation of holes that move by themselves in droplets of ionic liquids (IL) sitting inside water-ethanol mixtures. (2018-06-30)
Portland State study links outdoor recreation with water quality concerns
People who camp, hike, fish or participate in other forms of outdoor recreation generally have a higher level of concern about water quality than those who don't, according to a recent study co-authored by Portland State University professor Melissa Haeffner. (2018-04-03)
Jumping water striders know how to avoid breaking of the water surface
When escaping from attacking predators, different water strider species adjust their jump performance to their mass and morphology in order to jump off the water as fast and soon as possible without breaking of the water surface. (2016-12-08)
Estimates of recreational use values may remain stable over decades, finds UM research
Recently published work by a cooperative team of researchers, including participants from the University of Montana and the USGS Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center, reports the economic value that private boaters of the Grand Canyon assigned to their recreational experience remained relatively stable between 1985 and 2015 when adjusted for inflation. (2017-11-27)
In field tests, device harvests water from desert air
You really can extract clean drinking water right from the air, even in the driest of deserts, MIT researchers have found. (2018-03-22)
Evidence shows low energy sweeteners help reduce energy intake and body weight
Use of low energy sweeteners (LES) in place of sugar, in children and adults, leads to reduced calorie intake and body weight - and possibly also when comparing LES beverages to water -- according to a review led by researchers at the University of Bristol published in the International Journal of Obesity today. (2015-11-10)
Can hemp help the everglades?
Within Southern Florida, soil and water conditions indicate potential for leaching from the use of atrazine-based herbicides in corn crops. (2007-08-06)
In California, large-scale water cycles impact quakes a little
In California, seasonal changes in large-scale water cycles modestly influence small-scale quake activity, a new study reports. (2017-06-15)
Population growth puts dent in natural resources
It's a 500-pound gorilla that Robert Criss, Ph.D., professor of earth and planetary sciences in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. (2008-10-07)
Reducing power plants' freshwater consumption with Sandia's new silica filter
Power plants draw more freshwater than any other consumer in the United States, accounting for more than 50 percent of the nation's freshwater use at about 500 billion gallons daily. (2017-10-18)
Study opens new questions on how the atmosphere and oceans formed
A new study led by The Australian National University has found seawater cycles throughout the Earth's interior down to 2,900km, much deeper than previously thought, reopening questions about how the atmosphere and oceans formed. (2017-02-27)
Tiny crystals and nanowires could join forces to split water
Scientists are pursuing a tiny solution for harnessing one of the world's most abundant sources of clean energy: water. (2016-10-17)
Can we imitate organisms' abilities to decode water patterns for new technologies?
The shape of water. Can it tell us about what drives romance? (2018-04-05)
The shapes of water
In a new piece of research just published in Science (March 9), C. (2018-03-08)
New water-quality data on impact of corn, soybeans on nitrate in Iowa streams
As Iowa farmers have planted more acres of corn to meet the demand driven by the corn-based ethanol industry, many models predicted that nitrate concentrations in Iowa streams would increase accordingly. (2016-05-24)
Swapping where crops are grown could feed an extra 825 million people
Redrawing the global map of crop distribution on existing farmland could help meet growing demand for food and biofuels in coming decades, while significantly reducing water stress in agricultural areas. (2017-11-06)
Relationship quality tied to good health for young adults
For young people entering adulthood, high-quality relationships are associated with better physical and mental health, according to the results of a recently published study by a University at Buffalo-led research team. (2016-06-24)
Beverage industry capitalizing on countries with fewer health regulations
Considerable exposure to sugary drinks combined with a lack of water fountains in high schools are likely important contributors to increased consumption of sugar sweetened beverages, a new study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2017-09-11)
The underwater jungles of the sea give clearer water
When you take a swim in the sea and entangle your toes in underwater plants you can stay calm, they are doing good. (2017-08-30)
Water, water -- the two types of liquid water
There are two types of liquid water, according to research carried out by an international scientific collaboration. (2016-11-10)
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