Popular Water News and Current Events

Popular Water News and Current Events, Water News Articles.
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The age of water
Groundwater in Egypt's aquifers may be as much as 200,000 years old and that's important to know as officials in that country seek to increasing the use of groundwater, especially in the Eastern Desert, to mitigate growing water stress and allow for agricultural projects. (2019-05-23)

Storage wars
One answer to our greenhouse gas challenges may be right under our feet: Soil scientists Oliver Chadwick of UC Santa Barbara and Marc Kramer of Washington State University have found that minerals in soil can hold on to a significant amount of carbon pulled from the atmosphere. It's a mechanism that could potentially be exploited as the world tries to shift its carbon economy. (2019-01-02)

Research may lead to improvements in water use for crop irrigation
Two papers published in Irrigation and Drainage may help improve estimates of water requirements for crops, which will save water and minimize losses, allowing more land to be irrigated and subsequently more food to be produced. (2017-10-06)

Tracking wastewater's path to wells, groundwater
We often 'flush it and forget it' when it comes to waste from toilets and sinks. However, it's important to be able to track this wastewater to ensure it doesn't end up in unwanted places. Tracing where this water ends up is hard to measure: What's something found in all wastewater that will allow us to account for all of it? The answer, of all things, is artificial sweeteners. (2018-01-24)

How a 'shadow zone' traps the world's oldest ocean water
New research from an international team has revealed why the oldest water in the ocean in the North Pacific has remained trapped in a shadow zone around 2km below the sea surface for over 1000 years. (2017-11-10)

UTA expands efforts to develop water recycling technologies
The Collaborative Laboratories for Environmental Analysis and Remediation at the University of Texas at Arlington has expanded its partnership with oil field equipment supplier Challenger Water Solutions to develop water recycling technologies that will transform waste from unconventional oil and gas development into reusable water. (2018-04-18)

Unraveling a major cause of sea ice retreat in the Arctic Ocean
Quantitative analysis has evidenced the acceleration system of melting ice: dark water surfaces absorb more heat than white ice surfaces, thus melting ice and making more water surfaces in the Arctic Ocean. (2017-09-06)

Ocean floor geysers warm flowing sea water
An international team of earth scientists report movement of warmed sea water through the flat, Pacific Ocean floor off Costa Rica. The movement is greater than that off midocean volcanic ridges. The finding suggests possible marine life in a part of the ocean once considered barren. (2008-09-22)

Portland State study links outdoor recreation with water quality concerns
People who camp, hike, fish or participate in other forms of outdoor recreation generally have a higher level of concern about water quality than those who don't, according to a recent study co-authored by Portland State University professor Melissa Haeffner. (2018-04-03)

New lithium collection method could boost global supply
With continual technological advancements in mobile devices and electric cars, the global demand for lithium has quickly outpaced the rate at which it can be mined or recycled, but a University of Texas at Austin professor and his research team may have a solution. (2018-02-09)

Preventing lead spread
While lead pipes were banned decades ago, they still supply millions of American households with water each day. A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis has developed a new way to track where dangerous lead particles might be transported in the drinking water supply during a common abatement procedure. (2017-03-16)

Lack of water is key stressor for urban trees
A recent study finds that urban trees can survive increased heat and insect pests fairly well -- unless they are thirsty. Insufficient water not only harms trees, but allows other problems to have an outsized effect on trees in urban environments. (2018-03-13)

Fuzzy logic water quality
A fuzzy logic approach to analyzing water quality could help reduce the number of people in the developing world forced to drink polluted and diseased water for survival, according to a report in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of Environmental Technology and Management from Inderscience publishers. (2008-04-17)

Elevated lead in private wells could pose health risks
Since the Flint Water Crisis in Michigan, concern in the US over lead in drinking water has increased. Information about water from private wells has been limited because such wells are exempt from the 1974 Safe Drinking Water Act, the 1986 Lead Ban and the 2011 Reduction of Lead in Drinking Water Act. Now, researchers report a case study in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that sheds some light on the hidden health risks. (2018-03-14)

Carbon leads the way in clean energy
Groundbreaking research at Griffith University is leading the way in clean energy, with the use of carbon as a way to deliver energy using hydrogen. (2016-03-22)

Mars' surface water: We finally know what happened--SFU study
An international study co-led by SFU researcher Brendan Dyck has revealed that the sun may not have evaporated away all of Mars' surface water after all. (2017-12-21)

Global warming will accelerate water cycle over global land monsoon regions
A new study provides a broader understanding on the redistribution of freshwater resources across the globe induced by future changes in the monsoon system. (2019-07-23)

California's water saving brings bonus effects
Water-saving measures in California have also led to substantial reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and electricity consumption in the state. That is the conclusion of new research from the University of California, Davis, published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters. (2018-01-11)

Toilet-to-tap: Gross to think about, but how does it taste?
Researchers at University of California, Riverside, asked 143 people to express a preference among recycled water, bottled water, and tap water. They hypothesized that all three would score similarly. In fact, tap water was the least popular among the tasters; recycled water and bottled water scored about the same. (2018-03-13)

Super-adsorbent MOF captures twice its weight in water
Material chemists in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia have developed a superporous solid made up of a patchwork of metal ions and organic linkers (a metal-organic framework, or MOF) that can suck up to 200 percent of its own weight in atmospheric moisture. The technology, presented Jan. 11 in the journal Chem, could be applied to regulating humidity levels, particularly in confined environments such as aircraft cabins and air-conditioned buildings. (2018-01-11)

Tiny water creepy crawlies from South Korea and the Russian Far East
Tiny and hard to notice for the human eye water mites are present almost every stream and in in every continent apart from Antarctica. A study published in the open access journal Zookeys explores the water mites of the family Torrenticolidae from a variety of habitats in South Korea and the Russian species, providing the description of two new species. (2013-05-15)

Species identification in the water bottle
Environmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first. For the first time, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) systematically investigated the effect of various environmental factors on environmental DNA analyses. By doing so, the researchers have made an important step towards the standardized application of this method for the monitoring of water bodies. (2018-01-12)

Water, water -- the two types of liquid water
There are two types of liquid water, according to research carried out by an international scientific collaboration. This new peculiarity adds to the growing list of strange phenomena in what we imagine is a simple substance. The discovery could have implications for making and using nanoparticles as well as in understanding how proteins fold into their working shape in the body or misfold to cause diseases such as Alzheimer's or CJD. (2016-11-10)

Six feet under, a new approach to global warming
A Washington State University researcher has found that one-fourth of the carbon held by soil is bound to minerals as far as six feet below the surface. The discovery opens a new possibility for dealing with the element as it continues to warm the Earth's atmosphere. One hitch: Most of that carbon is concentrated deep beneath the world's wet forests, and they won't sequester as much as global temperatures continue to rise. (2018-11-26)

Microengineered slippery rough surface for water harvesting from air
A slippery rough surface (SRS) inspired by both pitcher plants and rice leaves outperforms state-of-the-art liquid-repellent surfaces in water harvesting applications, according to a team of researchers at Penn State and the University of Texas at Dallas. (2018-03-30)

Climate change study finds New Hampshire's warmer weather will bring warmer streams
Air temperature increases from climate change will make New Hampshire's streams warmer, according to Dartmouth-led research published in 'Freshwater Biology.' The study examined the extent to which stream waters are warming, which has implications for freshwater ecosystems across the nation given that many species depend on cold water to survive. (2018-04-30)

How the Atlantic Ocean became part of the global circulation at a climatic tipping point
A team of scientists, led by Dr Sietske Batenburg at the University of Oxford's Department of Earth Sciences, in close collaboration with German and UK institutions, have discovered that the exchange of water between the North and South Atlantic became significantly larger fifty-nine million years ago. (2018-11-26)

Best region for life on Mars was far below surface
The most habitable region for life on Mars would have been up to several miles below its surface, likely due to subsurface melting of thick ice sheets fueled by geothermal heat, a Rutgers-led study concludes. The study, published in the journal Science Advances, may help resolve what's known as the faint young sun paradox - a lingering key question in Mars science. (2020-12-02)

Arsenic exposure could increase diabetes risk
Inorganic arsenic, commonly found in ground water in certain areas, may increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2008-08-19)

Solar cells more efficient thanks to new material standing on edge
Researchers from Lund University in Sweden and from Fudan University in China have successfully designed a new structural organization using the promising solar cell material perovskite. The study shows that solar cells increase in efficiency thanks to the material's ability to self-organise by standing on edge. (2017-05-23)

Outperforming nature's water filtration ability with nanotubes
At just the right size, carbon nanotubes can filter water with better efficiency than biological proteins, a new study reveals. (2017-08-24)

Water, water, nowhere
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering have found that the unusual properties of graphane -- a two-dimensional polymer of carbon and hydrogen -- could form a type of anhydrous 'bucket brigade' that transports protons without the need for water, potentially leading to the development of more efficient hydrogen fuel cells for vehicles and other energy systems. (2017-05-04)

Creating surfaces that repel water and control its flow (video)
To prevent water and ice from making our shoes soggy, frosting our car windows and weighing down power lines with icicles, scientists have been exploring new coatings that can repel water. Now one team has developed a way to direct where the water goes when it's pushed away. Their report appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2017-12-13)

Thorium reactors may dispose of enormous amounts of weapons-grade plutonium
Scientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University are developing a new technology for multipurpose application of large amounts of weapons-grade plutonium accumulated in Russia and across the world. Instead of expensive storage of this nuclear material, TPU physicists propose to burn weapons-grade plutonium in reactors with thorium fuel, converting it into power and thermal energy. The units are capable of operating at low capacity (from 60 MW) at least 10-20 years. (2018-01-19)

Exposure to common THM levels in drinking water not associated with breast cancer
Exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs) in residential water is not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. (2018-02-26)

Keeping the hydrogen coming
A coating of molybdenum improves the efficiency of catalysts for producing hydrogen. (2017-06-06)

Researchers create first global map of water in Moon's soil
A new study maps the trace concentrations of water implanted in the lunar soil by the solar wind, a water source that could be used as resource in future lunar exploration. (2017-09-13)

Researchers develop model to show how bacteria grow in plumbing systems
Bacteria in tap water can multiply when a faucet isn't used for a few days, such as when a house is vacant over a week's vacation, a new study from University of Illinois engineers found. The study suggests a new method to show how microbial communities, including those responsible for illnesses like Legionnaires' disease, may assemble inside the plumbing systems of homes and public buildings. (2018-03-29)

In California, large-scale water cycles impact quakes a little
In California, seasonal changes in large-scale water cycles modestly influence small-scale quake activity, a new study reports. (2017-06-15)

Jumping water striders know how to avoid breaking of the water surface
When escaping from attacking predators, different water strider species adjust their jump performance to their mass and morphology in order to jump off the water as fast and soon as possible without breaking of the water surface. (2016-12-08)

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