Popular Waves News and Current Events

Popular Waves News and Current Events, Waves News Articles.
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Slime travelers
New UC Riverside-led research settles a longstanding debate about whether the most ancient animal communities were deliberately mobile. It turns out they were, because they were hungry. (2019-06-20)

Weyl goes chiral
Quasiparticles that behave like massless fermions, known as Weyl fermions, have been in recent years at the center of a string of exciting findings in condensed matter physics. The group of physicist Sebastian Huber at ETH Zurich now reports experiments in which they got a handle on one of the defining properties of Weyl fermions -- their chirality. (2019-02-11)

Older than the moon
Geochemist Matt Jackson finds that only the hottest, most buoyant mantle plumes draw from a primordial reservoir deep in the Earth. (2017-02-06)

Spintronics: New production method makes crystalline microstructures universally usable
New storage and information technology requires new higher performance materials. One of these materials is yttrium iron garnet, which has special magnetic properties. Thanks to a new process, it can now be transferred to any material. Developed by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the method could advance the production of smaller, faster and more energy-efficient components for data storage and information processing. The physicists have published their results in the journal ''Applied Physics Letters''. (2021-02-23)

X-ray imaging with a significantly enhanced resolution
Physicists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY, Hamburg) have come up with a method that could significantly improve the quality of X-ray images in comparison to conventional methods. Incoherent diffractive imaging (IDI) could help to image individual atoms in nanocrystals or molecules faster and with a much higher resolution. (2017-08-14)

WVU astronomers help detect the most massive neutron star ever measured
West Virginia University researchers have helped discover the most massive neutron star to date, a breakthrough uncovered through the Green Bank Telescope. The neutron star, called J0740+6620, is a rapidly spinning pulsar that packs 2.17 times the mass of the sun (which is 333,000 times the mass of the Earth) into a sphere only 20-30 kilometers, or about 15 miles, across. (2019-09-16)

Brilliant burst in space reveals universe's magnetic field
Scientists have detected the brightest fast burst of radio waves in space to date -- locating the source of the event with more precision than previous efforts. (2016-11-17)

Riding the wave: Pioneering research tames nanoquakes
Researchers from the University of Exeter have pioneered a new technique to control high frequency sound waves, commonly found within everyday devices such as mobile phones. (2017-08-02)

Lightning-fast communications
Researchers from the University of Utah have discovered that a special kind of perovskite, a combination of an organic and inorganic compound that has the same structure as the original mineral, can be layered on a silicon wafer to create a vital component for the communications system of the future. That system would use the terahertz spectrum, the next generation of communications bandwidth that uses light instead of electricity to shuttle data. (2017-11-06)

Scientists identify circuit responsible for building memories during sleep
Neuroscientists at the University of Alberta have identified a mechanism that may help build memories during deep sleep, according to a new study. (2019-11-05)

Slow, steady waves keep brain humming
Very slow brain waves, long considered an artifact of brain scanning techniques, may be more important than anyone had realized. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that very slow waves are directly linked to state of consciousness and may be involved in coordinating activity across distant brain regions. (2018-03-29)

Exploring the realistic nature of the wave function in quantum mechanics
The wave function is central in quantum mechanics and describes the quantum state of microscopic objects. But what the wave function essentially represents is still in debate. Now researchers in Tsinghua University proposed and experimentally realized an encounter-delay-choice experiment to demonstrate the realistic interpretation for the wave function. This will be helpful to unlock the mysteries of the wave function, and deepen our understanding of quantum mechanics. (2018-01-04)

A new look at the nature of dark matter
A new study suggests that the gravitational waves detected by the LIGO experiment must have come from black holes generated during the collapse of stars, and not in the earliest phases of the Universe. (2017-03-06)

Light is enough to peer through a mouse skull
Having selected proper light waves, researchers have demonstrated a more than 10-fold improvement of light energy delivery to targets that are too deeply embedded to visualize with current optical imaging. Able to picture through a young mouse skull in the laboratory, this noninvasive technique does not cause any damage to tissues and does not need injections of fluorescent molecules to label the target. (2018-03-26)

At long last, a 3D picture of an interstellar cloud, a clue to star formation
A duo of astronomers has accomplished a difficult feat: determining the 3D structure of an interstellar cloud, the birth site of stars. (2018-05-10)

Century of data shows sea-level rise shifting tides in Delaware, Chesapeake bays
The warming climate is expected to affect coastal regions worldwide as glaciers and ice sheets melt, raising sea level globally. For the first time, an international team has found evidence of how sea-level rise already is affecting high and low tides in both the Chesapeake and Delaware bays, two large estuaries of the eastern United States. (2018-01-24)

The wave power farm off Mutriku could improve its efficiency
The study by the UPV/EHU's EOLO (Meteorology, Climate and Environment) research group reveals that the technology used at the farm off Mutriku -- a global pioneer in generating wave power -- needs to improve its output to be on a par with the values of other renewable energy sources, and to facilitate the marketing of its power. (2017-12-28)

Measuring the risks of extreme temperatures on public health
Heat and cold waves affect people with certain health conditions differently, highlighting the need for tailored public service risk communication. (2018-04-13)

Tsunami signals to measure glacier calving in Greenland
Scientists have employed a new method utilizing tsunami signals to calculate the calving magnitude of an ocean-terminating glacier in northwestern Greenland, uncovering correlations between calving flux and environmental factors such as air temperature, ice speed, and ocean tides. (2019-05-08)

Researchers links coastal nuisance flooding to special type of slow-moving oce
A team of international researchers has found a link between seasonal fluctuations in sea level to a long-time phenomenon -- Rossby Waves. And this connection may lead to a new tool to help (2018-07-05)

MRI 'glove' provides new look at hand anatomy
A new kind of MRI component in the shape of a glove delivers the first clear images of bones, tendons and ligaments moving together. (2018-05-08)

Map of ionospheric disturbances to help improve radio network systems
The paper, titled (2018-01-12)

Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia
Harvard Medical School researchers lead the first whole-genome analysis of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia Study identifies at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years, each shaping the genetics of Southeast Asia (2018-05-17)

New approach uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungs
A team of engineering and medical researchers has found a way to use ultrasound to monitor fluid levels in the lung, offering a noninvasive way to track progress in treating pulmonary edema -- fluid in the lungs -- which often occurs in patients with congestive heart failure. The approach, which has been demonstrated in rats, also holds promise for diagnosing scarring, or fibrosis, in the lung. (2017-03-21)

Brain stethoscope listens for silent seizures
By converting brain waves into sound, even non-specialists can detect 'silent seizures' -- epileptic seizures without the convulsions most of us expect. (2018-03-21)

The path length of light in opaque media
A transparent substance will allow the light to travel through on a straight line, in a turbid substance the light will be scattered numerous times, travelling on more complicated zig-zag trajectories. But astonishingly, the average total distance covered by the light inside the substance is always the same. (2017-11-10)

Beyond good vibrations: New insights into metamaterial magic
Metamaterials have amazing potential--think invisibility cloaks and perfect lenses--but they are more likely to be found in a Harry Potter novel than a lab. To help bring them closer to reality, Michigan Technological University's Elena Semouchkina has gone back to basics and demonstrated that the fundamental physics of metamaterials is more complex than scientists once thought. (2017-11-06)

To keep Saturn's A ring contained, its moons stand united
For three decades, astronomers thought that only Saturn's moon Janus confined the planet's A ring -- the largest and farthest of the visible rings. But after poring over NASA's Cassini mission data, Cornell astronomers now conclude that the teamwork of seven moons keeps this ring corralled. (2017-10-17)

Hot bodies are attractive
You might think that a hot object pushes atoms and molecules away due to radiation pressure. But a UC Berkeley team showed that for a polarizable atom, the opposite occurs: the hot object attracts it. Using an atom interferometer, they found the attraction was 20 times stronger than the gravitational attraction between a tungsten object and a cesium atom. Though negligible in most situations, next-generation gravitational wave experiments may have to take this into account. (2017-12-08)

Practical spin wave transistor one step closer
University of Groningen physicists have managed to alter the flow of spin waves through a magnet, using only an electrical current. This is a huge step towards the spin transistor that is needed to construct spintronic devices. These promise to be much more energy efficient than conventional electronics. The results were published on March 2 in Physical Review Letters. (2018-03-01)

Chirping is welcome in birds but not in fusion devices
Article describes cause of chirping that signals loss of heat from fusion reactions. (2018-03-16)

Potential biomarker for autism
A study of young children with autism spectrum disorder published in JNeurosci reveals altered brain waves compared to typically developing children during a motor control task. The non-invasive neuroimaging technique used in this study could be employed to detect autism symptoms as early as infancy. (2018-08-13)

Loss of work productivity in a warming world
Heat stress affects the health of workers and reduces the work productivity by changing the ambient working environment thus leading to economic losses. Scientists identified the regions of vulnerability to heat waves that might have been overlooked in the past. (2018-10-26)

SDU researchers present a new model for what dark matter might be
There are indications that we might never see the universe's mysterious dark matter. Now SDU researchers turn this somehow depressing scenario into an advantage and propose a new model for what dark matter might be -- and how to test it. (2016-03-14)

Improving memory with magnets
The ability to remember sounds, and manipulate them in our minds, is incredibly important to our daily lives -- without it we would not be able to understand a sentence, or do simple arithmetic. New research is shedding light on how sound memory works, and is even demonstrating a means to improve it. (2017-03-27)

A self-propelled catheter with earthworm-like peristaltic motion
A research team of Toho University and Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed a mechanism of a self-propelled catheter capable of generating peristaltic motion just like an earthworm by applying pneumatic pressure inside only one tube. The goal is to develop an AutoGuide robot that propels itself inside bronchi, automatically reaching the target lesion within the lungs, and can take a lesion sample and provide treatment. (2017-10-10)

How does urban-induced warming in Beijing interact with air temperature in summer?
Beijing has undergone several important urbanization development stages since late 1978. Linked with urbanization, the so-called 'urban heat island effect' is a key problem caused by urban land expansion. (2018-04-25)

ALMA measures size of seeds of planets
Researchers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), have for the first time, achieved a precise size measurement of small dust particles around a young star through radio-wave polarization. ALMA's high sensitivity for detecting polarized radio waves made possible this important step in tracing the formation of planets around young stars. (2016-12-05)

A new glimpse into working memory
MIT study finds bursts of neural activity as the brain holds information in mind, overturns a long-held model. (2016-03-17)

Ancient signals from the early universe
For the first time, theoretical physicists from the University of Basel have calculated the signal of specific gravitational wave sources that emerged fractions of a second after the Big Bang. The source of the signal is a long-lost cosmological phenomenon called 'oscillon.' The journal Physical Review Letters has published the results. (2017-02-10)

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