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Popular Waves News and Current Events, Waves News Articles.
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Variations in seafloor create freak ocean waves
Florida State University researchers have found that abrupt variations in the seafloor can cause dangerous ocean waves known as rogue or freak waves -- waves so catastrophic that they were once thought to be the figments of seafarers' imaginations. (2019-02-01)

ALMA measures size of seeds of planets
Researchers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), have for the first time, achieved a precise size measurement of small dust particles around a young star through radio-wave polarization. ALMA's high sensitivity for detecting polarized radio waves made possible this important step in tracing the formation of planets around young stars. (2016-12-05)

Cold production of new seafloor
Magma steadily emerges between oceanic plates. It pushes the plates apart, builds large underwater mountains and forms new seafloor. This is one of the fundamental processes that constantly change the face of the Earth. But there are also times when new seabed is created without any volcanism, by un-roofing mantle material directly at the seafloor. Scientists led by GEOMAR, Germany have published the first estimation based on seismic data on how much seafloor is produced this way. (2018-05-24)

A new glimpse into working memory
MIT study finds bursts of neural activity as the brain holds information in mind, overturns a long-held model. (2016-03-17)

Polarization has strong impact on electrons, study shows
New research helps understand movement of electrons in two-dimensional systems. (2018-04-10)

Pulsating Aurora mysteries uncovered with help from NASA's THEMIS mission
The precise mechanism driving pulsating auroras, long unknown, has now been identified with help from NASA's THEMIS mission. (2018-02-20)

Black hole spin cranks-up radio volume
Statistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves. By analyzing nearly 8000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, research team found that the oxygen emissions are 1.5 times stronger in radio loud quasars than in radio quiet quasars. This implies that spin is an important factor in the generation of jets. (2018-01-12)

Asymmetric sound absorption lets in the light
Many asymmetric absorbers are currently based on a single-port system, where sound enters one side and is absorbed before a rigid wall. In this design, however, light and air are unable to pass through the system. But new research shows that asymmetric absorption can be realized within a straight transparent waveguide. The waveguide allows light transmission and air flow through the absorber, and is described this week in Applied Physics Letters. (2017-10-06)

Light triggers gold in unexpected way
Rice University researchers have discovered a fundamentally different form of light-matter interaction in their experiments with gold nanoparticles. The discovery may become useful in the development of next-generation, ultrasmall optical components for computers and antennas. (2018-11-30)

Fast radio bursts 'twists and shouts' help scientists determine source of cosmic blasts
An international group of astronomers has found that the Cornell University-discovered fast radio burst FRB 121102 -- a brief, gigantic pulse of radio waves from 3 billion light years away -- passes through a veil of magnetized plasma. This causes the cosmic blasts to 'shout and twist,' which will help the scientists determine the source. (2018-01-10)

Lightweight metal foam blocks blastwave, debris from high-explosive rounds
New research shows that stainless steel composite metal foam (CMF) can block blast pressure and fragmentation at 5,000 feet per second from high explosive incendiary (HEI) rounds that detonate only 18 inches away. (2018-03-26)

Gravity: A faster method for gauging the size of great quakes
Immediately following Japan's 2011 Tohoku earthquake, while seismic waves still traveled to seismic stations to offer insight into the event's magnitude, seismographs recorded a gravity change reflective of this value, researchers report. (2017-11-30)

Waves in lakes make waves in the Earth
In a study published today in the Journal of Geophysical Research Solid Earth, scientists at the University of Utah report that small seismic signals in lakes can aid science. As a record of wave motion in a lake, they can reveal when a lake freezes over and when it thaws. And as a small, constant source of seismic energy in the surrounding earth, lake microseisms can shine a light on the geology surrounding a lake. (2017-10-16)

Towards mastering terahertz waves?
Terahertz waves allow for the detection of materials that are undetectable at other frequencies. However, the use of these waves is severely limited by the absence of suitable devices and materials allowing to control them. Researchers at UNIGE working with the ETHZ have developed a technique based on the use of graphene, which allows for the potentially very quick control of both the intensity and the polarization of terahertz light. (2017-03-07)

Scientists detect radio echoes of a black hole feeding on a star
An MIT scientist has detected radio echoes of a black hole feeding on a star, suggesting black hole emits a jet of energy proportional to the stellar material it gobbles up. (2018-03-19)

Blood testing via sound waves may replace some tissue biopsies
Scientists from MIT and other institutions have developed a microfluidic device that uses sound waves to isolate cellular packets called exosomes from blood samples, which could be used to diagnose diseases such as cancer or fetal abnormalities. (2017-09-18)

Merging neutron stars
The option to measure the gravitational waves of two merging neutron stars has offered the chance to answer some of the fundamental questions about the structure of matter. At the extremely high temperatures and densities in the merger scientists conjecture a phase-transition where neutrons dissolve into their constituents: quarks and gluons. (2019-02-14)

Taking a spin on plasma space tornadoes with NASA observations
New NASA mission results show that tornado-like swirls of space plasma create tumultuous boundaries in the near-Earth environment, letting dangerous high-energy particles slip into near Earth space. (2017-11-17)

Dielectric metamaterial is dynamically tuned by light
Researchers at Duke University have built the first metal-free, dynamically tunable metamaterial for controlling electromagnetic waves. The approach could form the basis for technologies ranging from improved security scanners to new types of visual displays. While previous metamaterials control electromagnetic waves through their electric properties, the new technology can also manipulate them through their magnetic properties. It won't melt and can be reconfigured on the fly. (2018-05-01)

Synchronised waves control embryonic patterning
During an embryo's journey from a single cell to a complex organism, countless patterning processes make sure that the right cells develop in exactly the right location and at the right time. Cells activate specific genes in a rhythmic manner during this early development, resulting in waves of activation sweeping through the embryo. EMBL scientists now show that the rhythm between two specific sets of waves -- Wnt and Notch -- enables the formation of new segments. (2018-02-22)

Controlling ultrasound with 3-D printed devices
Researchers have 3-D printed a new kind of device that can harness high-pressure ultrasound to move, manipulate, or destroy tiny objects like particles, drops or biological tissue at scales comparable with cells. By providing unprecedented control of photoacoustic waves, such a device can be helpful for performing precise surgery, analyzing the properties of materials, and for scientific research in the lab. They discuss their work in this week's Applied Physics Letters. (2016-10-25)

Seizures may be detected through sound
A new Epilepsia study indicates that individuals without electroencephalogram (EEG) training can detect ongoing seizures in comatose patients through a novel method by which patients' brain waves are converted to sound. (2018-03-21)

A sustainable future powered by sea
OIST researchers develop turbines to convert the power of ocean waves into clean, renewable energy. (2017-09-22)

Listening to quantum radio
Researchers at Delft University of Technology have created a quantum circuit that enables them to listen to the weakest radio signal allowed by quantum mechanics. This new quantum circuit opens the door to possible future applications in areas such as radio astronomy and medicine (MRI). It also enables researchers to do experiments that can shed light on the interplay between quantum mechanics and gravity. (2019-03-08)

Southern California's tectonic plates revealed in detail
Geologists at Brown University have produced the most detailed picture of southern California's lithosphere, which is crucial to understanding the geological forces that shaped the area. The team found the lithosphere's thickness differs markedly throughout, yielding new insights into how rifting shaped the southern California terrain. Results are published in Science. (2011-10-06)

Diffused light shows clear structures
Scientists gain an insight into the fascinating world of atoms and molecules using x-ray microscopes. Ground-breaking research by physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, and the University of Hamburg has paved the way towards new imaging techniques. The team of scientists have successfully developed and tested a method which is considerably more effective than conventional procedures. The researchers' findings have recently been published in the renowned journal Nature Physics. (2017-11-06)

Human influence on climate change will fuel more extreme heat waves in US
Human-caused climate change will drive more extreme summer heat waves in the western US, including in California and the Southwest as early as 2020, new research shows. (2018-03-19)

'Invisibility cloaks' could break sound barriers
Contrary to earlier predictions, Duke University engineers have found that a three-dimensional sound cloak is possible, at least in theory. (2008-01-09)

PPPL scientist uncovers physics behind plasma-etching process
PPPL physicist Igor Kaganovich and collaborators have uncovered some of the physics that make possible the etching of silicon computer chips, which power cell phones, computers, and a huge range of electronic devices. (2017-01-27)

New math tools for new materials
University of Utah mathematician Graeme Milton presents a new tool for understanding how energy waves move through complex materials, opening up possibilities to design materials that absorb or bend energy as desired. (2016-11-21)

When it comes to antennas, size matters
In a paper published online in Nature Communications, Nian Sun, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Northeastern, and his colleagues describe a new approach to designing antennas. The discovery enables researchers to construct antennas that are up to a thousand times smaller than currently available antennas, Sun said. (2017-08-29)

Basque researchers turn light upside down
Researchers from CIC nanoGUNE (San Sebastian, Spain), in collaboration with the Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC, San Sebastian, Spain) and Kansas State University (USA), report in Science the development of a so called 'hyperbolic metasurface' on which light propagates with completely reshaped wafefronts. This scientific achievement towards a more precise control and monitoring of light is highly interesting for the long run technological challenge of miniaturizing optical devices for sensing and signal processing. (2018-02-22)

Visualization of regions of electromagnetic wave-plasma interactions surrounding the Earth
The researchers investigated wave-particle interactions between energetic electrons and chorus waves evolving in the space surrounding the Earth, using the scientific satellite Arase and, simultaneously, transient auroral flashes by the ground-based global observation network. The investigation visualized asymmetric spatial development of wave-particle interaction regions on the order of sub-seconds. This is expected to contribute to the safe and secure exploration of space, e.g., by establishing hazard maps of the space electromagnetic environment. (2019-02-04)

Earth-space telescope system produces hot surprise
Combining an orbiting radio telescope with telescopes on Earth made a system capable of the highest resolution of any observation ever made in astronomy. The super sharp radio 'vision' produced a pair of surprises. (2016-03-29)

Psst! A whispering gallery for light boosts solar cells
Trapping light with an optical version of a whispering gallery, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a nanoscale coating for solar cells that enables them to absorb about 20 percent more sunlight than uncoated devices. (2018-04-13)

Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA
A next-generation observatory, called LISA, is expected to be in space in 2034, and it will be sensitive to gravitational waves of a lower frequency than those detected by the Earth-bound Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO). (2018-05-11)

Final dance of unequal black hole partners
Lousto and James Healy (both of Rochester Institute of Technology) used the Frontera supercomputer to model for the first time a black hole merger of two black holes with very different sizes (128:1). The research required seven months of constant computation. The results, published in Physical Review Letters, predicts the gravitational waves such a merger would produce, as well as characteristics of the resulting merged black hole. (2020-11-06)

New imaging technique peers inside living cells
Called Ultrasound Bioprobe, the non-invasive approach developed at Northwestern University allows researchers to view sub-cellular structures and their mechanical behavior at nanoscale resolution. (2017-11-16)

Historical records help uncover new mechanism in deadly 1906 Taiwan quake
Researchers reexamining historical seismograms from the 1906 Meishan earthquake have uncovered a new mechanism for the quake, one of the deadliest to ever strike Taiwan. (2018-05-01)

Entangling biological systems
Using green fluorescent proteins obtained from Escherichia coli, researchers at Northwestern University demonstrate quantum mechanical effects from a biological system. (2017-12-05)

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