Popular White Matter News and Current Events | Page 25

Popular White Matter News and Current Events, White Matter News Articles.
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IU researchers: Chemotherapy alters brain tissue in breast cancer patients
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center have published the first report using imaging to show that changes in brain tissue can occur in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. (2010-09-29)

Close-range blast exposure & neurodegenerative processes among those with genetic risk for AD
A new study raises the possibility that close-range blast exposure among veterans with a genetically higher risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), may make them more susceptible to degradation of their white matter, the part of the brain made of fiber connections called axons that connect nerve cells. (2019-06-24)

APS tip sheet: Dark matter's galactic emissions and game theory of vaccination
The APS Tip Sheet highlights noteworthy research recently published in the Physical Review Journals. Unless otherwise noted, Physical Review papers are not embargoed. Please contact media@aps.org for media inquiries and complimentary access to the journals. (2019-12-11)

51% of Americans agree paying college athletes should be allowed
More Americans than not believe that college athletes should be allowed to be paid more than what it costs them to go to school, a new national study of nearly 4,000 people suggests. Findings from the National Sports and Society Survey (NSASS) suggest that 51 percent of adults agree that college athletes should have the ability to be paid above school costs, 41 percent disagree and 8 percent don't know. (2020-11-24)

Prevalence of visual impairment among preschool children projected to increase
The number of preschool children in the US with visual impairment is projected to increase by more than 25 percent in the coming decades, with the majority of visual impairment resulting from simple uncorrected refractive error, according to a study published by JAMA Ophthalmology. (2017-05-04)

Identifying therapeutic targets in sepsis' cellular videogame
Exciting new research has defined the chain of molecular events that goes awry in sepsis, opening up opportunities for new treatments to fight the condition that affects more than a million Americans each year and kills up to a third of them. (2019-05-08)

Toxic mercury in aquatic life could spike with greater land runoff
A highly toxic form of mercury could jump by 300 to 600 percent in zooplankton -- tiny animals at the base of the marine food chain -- if land runoff increases by 15 to 30 percent, according to a new study. And such an increase is possible due to climate change, according to the pioneering study by Rutgers University and other scientists published today in Science Advances. (2017-01-27)

Exposure to particulate air pollutants associated with numerous cancers
Researchers have found that long-term exposure to environmental pollutants was associated with increased risk of mortality for many types of cancer in an elderly Hong Kong population. (2016-04-29)

Study casts doubt on warming implications of brown carbon aerosol from wildfires
As devastating wildfires rage in California wine country, a team of environmental engineers at Washington University in St. Louis have made a new discovery about wildfire smoke, and its effect on the atmosphere. (2017-10-11)

Maintaining heart health may protect against cognitive decline
People with a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease have increased cognitive decline, including an increase in typical markers of Alzheimer's disease, suggesting that monitoring and controlling for heart disease may be key to maintaining and improving cognitive health later in life, according to research published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2020-05-18)

Air pollution linked to higher risk of sight loss from AMD
Air pollution is linked to a heightened risk of progressive and irreversible sight loss, known as age related macular degeneration (AMD), reveals a large long term study led by UCL researchers, published in the British Journal of Ophthalmology. (2021-01-25)

Oldest stars may shed light on dark matter, researchers report in Science
The universe's earliest stars may hold clues to the nature of dark matter, the mysterious stuff that makes up most of the universe's matter but doesn't interact with light, cosmologists report. (2007-09-13)

Dark matter guides growth of supermassive black holes
Every massive galaxy has a black hole at its center, and the heftier the galaxy, the bigger its black hole. But why are the two related? After all, the black hole is millions of times smaller and less massive than its home galaxy. A new study of football-shaped collections of stars called elliptical galaxies finds that the invisible hand of dark matter somehow influences black hole growth. (2015-02-18)

Sexual objectification increases women's fear of crime
A study to be published in Sex Roles, published by Springer, offers an explanation for why women fear face-to-face crime more than men, despite being less likely to experience most crimes. The findings by Laurel Watson from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, support the theory that women may have a greater fear of crime due to the potential of also being raped during these encounters. (2015-01-14)

Store-bought freshwater fish contain elevated levels of mercury, arsenic and selenium
White bass wild-caught and sold commercially contained significantly higher levels of mercury, arsenic and selenium than fish caught near former industrial areas, according to a study by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh. Results indicated that mercury levels were 2.2 to 4.8 times higher in fish caught in the Canadian Lake Erie than in fish caught near former iron and steel mills. (2007-11-07)

Red Wine Consumption And Heart Disease
To test the protective effect of wine on the heart, volunteers were fed three drinks per day of red or white wine or an equivalent amount of phenolic extract from red wine for two weeks. Low density lipoprotein resisted oxidation in the red wine or phenolic group but not in white wine drinkers. Accompanying editorial (Waterhouse et al) points out that the protective mechanism remains conjectural. (1998-08-17)

Frankfurt physicists set limits on size of neutron stars
How large is a neutron star? Previous estimates varied from eight to sixteen kilometres. Astrophysicists at the Goethe University Frankfurt and the FIAS have now succeeded in determining the size of neutron stars to within 1.5 kilometres by using an elaborate statistical approach supported by data from the measurement of gravitational waves. The researchers' report appears in the current issue of Physical Review Letters. (2018-06-26)

Small vessel disease MRI marker linked to worse cognitive health in older adults
Seemingly harmless fluid-filled spaces around the cerebral small vessels, commonly seen on brain MRIs in older adults, are now thought to be associated with more compromised cognitive skills, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Neurology. (2019-03-21)

Study finds biomarker of CTE in some former athletes with multiple concussions
In a group of former professional athletes who experienced multiple concussions, a new study has found that approximately half the group had higher than normal levels of a protein called tau in their cerebrospinal fluid, the fluid surrounding the brain and spine. The study is published in the May 8, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-05-08)

Black and ethnic minority people face inequality in diabetes treatment
Black and ethnic minority people are not as likely to be prescribed newer medication for Type 2 diabetes and they experience less adequate monitoring of their condition compared to their white peers, new collaborative research from the University of Surrey and Eli Lilly and Company Limited finds. (2019-10-07)

Like Pavlov's dog, this thermoplastic is learning a new trick: Walking
Researchers in Finland are 'training' pieces of plastic to walk under the command of light. The method developed, published Dec. 4 in the journal Matter, is the first time a synthetic actuator 'learns' to do new 'tricks' based on its past experiences, without computer programming. (2019-12-04)

Non-obese Vietnamese Americans are 60% more likely to have diabetes
A new study has found that Vietnamese-American adults who were not obese were 60% more likely to have diabetes than non-obese, non-Hispanic, White Americans, after accounting for age, sex, sociodemographic factors, smoking history and exercise level. (2020-10-16)

Has the hidden matter of the universe been discovered?
Astrophysicists consider that around 40% of the ordinary matter that makes up stars, planets and galaxies remains undetected, concealed in the form of a hot gas in the complexe cosmic web. Today, scientists at the Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale (CNRS/Université Paris-Saclay) may have detected, for the first time, this hidden matter through an innovative statistical analysis of 20-year-old data. Their findings are published on November 6, 2020 in Astronomy & Astrophysics. (2020-11-06)

Why low oxygen levels soon after birth may raise risk for learning & behavioral disorders
New research published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, shows that the development of white matter in the mouse brains is delayed when they are exposed to chronic low oxygen levels shortly after birth. If true in humans, this may help explain why infants born with cyanotic heart disease, prematurity and/or severe lung disease often exhibit developmental disabilities that effect learning during childhood, years after the low-oxygen exposure. (2016-01-06)

Ethnoburbs: Segregation in suburbia
White flight does not end when residents move from poor urban neighborhoods to the suburbs. An Indiana U. study found that white flight from one suburban neighborhood to another occurs when white residents move away from 'ethnoburbs,' suburban neighborhoods that attract a growing number of middle-class minority residents. The study will be discussed on Saturday at the American Sociological Association annual meeting. (2014-08-16)

Hydrogen peroxide marshals immune system
Using the zebrafish as an animal model, researchers have discovered that the body uses hydrogen peroxide to sound the alarm when a tissue has been injured. As a direct result of this hydrogen-peroxide red alert, white blood cells come to the aid of the wounded site. (2009-06-03)

Study suggests genetically modifying sunflowers for white mold resistance
A field study conducted by plant scientists at Vanderbilt University and Indiana University found that a transgene that can provide commercial sunflowers with additional protection against a disease called white mold is unlikely to spread throughout the wild sunflower population: Wild sunflowers already possess a degree of resistance to white mold and, as a result, those that pick up the transgene do not appear to gain a reproductive advantage that would cause them to spread widely. (2003-05-22)

Moth gift: Winner of an eBay auction thanks his mother by naming a new species after her
Winner of an eBay auction Steve Mix received the opportunity to pick the name for a new species of satiny-white winged moth collected from the white gypsum dunes of the White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. A fan of butterflies and moths himself, he chose to honor his supportive and encouraging mother Delinda Mix, so the moth is now formally listed under the species name delindae. It is described in the open access journal ZooKeys. (2017-02-20)

Difficulty in noticing that white people are white, new study finds
A new study published today in Journal of Experimental Psychology: General has found that people fail to notice that white people are white. (2017-01-10)

Whites' racial prejudice can lessen over time, research shows
Prejudice among white people can lessen over time, according to new research from Rice University. (2019-06-19)

Professional athletes may not suffer more severe cognitive impairment than others, study indicates
DALLAS - Nov. 11, 2020 - Even though repeated hits to the head are common in professional sports, the long-term effects of concussions are still poorly understood. While many believe that professional athletes who experience multiple concussions will end up with severe cognitive impairment later in life, a UT Southwestern study suggests that may not necessarily be the case. (2020-11-11)

COVID-19 shutdown effect on air quality mixed
In April 2020, as remote work and social distancing policies were in place in Delaware and a number of other states, there was a sense the skies were clearer and less polluted with fewer people on the road. But new research from a team led by University of Delaware, Penn State and Columbia University researchers found a murkier picture. (2020-11-12)

New evidence in favor of dark matter: The bars in galaxies are spinning more slowly than we thought
An article recently published in the Astrophysical Journal by a team of IAC researchers show that bars in galaxies are rotating much more slowly than had been inferred by previous works. (2017-02-08)

In tiny supercooled clouds, physicists exchange light and matter
Physicists have for the first time stopped and extinguished a light pulse in one part of space and then revived it in a completely separate location. They accomplished this feat by completely converting the light pulse into matter that travels between the two locations and is subsequently changed back to light. Matter, unlike light, can easily be manipulated, and the experiments provide a powerful means to control optical information. (2007-02-07)

Black women in Canada have substantially higher risk of preterm birth than white women
A study comparing rates of preterm birth among non-Hispanic black and non-Hispanic white women in Canada found that the rates were substantially higher among black women than white women, mirroring the disparity in the United States. The research study, published in Canadian Medical Association Journal, is based on new cohort data from the Canadian Live Birth, Infant Death and Stillbirth Database linked with 2006 Canadian census data. (2015-11-09)

Treatment lessens cerebral damage following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
Among comatose survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, treatment with inhaled xenon gas combined with hypothermia, compared with hypothermia alone, resulted in less white matter damage; however, there was no significant difference in neurological outcomes or death at six months, according to a study appearing in the March 15 issue of JAMA. (2016-03-15)

Media portrayal of public shooters can perpetuate stereotypes
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Journalism have found that media portrayals of public shooters vary based on the race of the shooter, regardless of the circumstances of the shooting. (2017-04-26)

Neutrophil-inspired propulsion
Inspired by white blood cells rolling on endovascular walls before transmigrating to the disease site, scientists at ETH Zurich have succeeded in getting particles to move along the walls of microscopic, three-dimensional vessels. This method could be used in targeted cancer therapeutics. (2017-11-30)

Significant disparities in college student mental health treatment across race/ethnicity
The first nationally representative study since the 1990s to examine mental health among college students of color, led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher, shows significant disparities in treatment across race/ethnicity. (2018-09-17)

Brain structure determines individual differences regarding music sensitivity
The white matter structure in the brain reflects music sensitivity, according to a study by the research group on Cognition and Brain Plasticity of the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona (UB) and the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (UB-IDIBELL). (2019-06-27)

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