Popular Working Memory News and Current Events

Popular Working Memory News and Current Events, Working Memory News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
An ionic black box
While we embrace the way the Internet of Things already is making our lives more streamlined and convenient, the cybersecurity risk posed by millions of wirelessly connected gadgets, devices and appliances remains a huge concern. Even single, targeted attacks can result in major damage; when cybercriminals control and manipulate several nodes in a network, the potential for destruction increases. (2018-04-25)

Speed of light: Toward a future quantum internet
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have demonstrated proof-of-principle for a device that could serve as the backbone of a future quantum Internet. U of T professor Hoi-Kwong Lo and his collaborators have developed a prototype for a key element for all-photonic quantum repeaters, a critical step in long-distance quantum communication. (2019-01-28)

Scientists identify circuit responsible for building memories during sleep
Neuroscientists at the University of Alberta have identified a mechanism that may help build memories during deep sleep, according to a new study. (2019-11-05)

Flies the key to studying the causes of dementia
A research team from the University of Plymouth, University of Southampton and the Alexander Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Center, Vari, Greece, have studied two structurally-similar proteins in the adult brain and have found that they play distinct roles in the development of dementia. (2017-05-19)

How long does memory last? For shape memory alloys, the longer the better
Scientists captured live action details of the phase transitions of shape memory alloys, giving them a better idea how to improve their properties for applications. (2019-10-03)

A NEAT discovery about memory
UAB researchers say over expression of NEAT1, an noncoding RNA, appears to diminish the ability of older brains to form memories. Inhibiting NEAT1 via CRISPR technology could be a means to improve memory in older humans. (2019-07-02)

MIT system aims to prevent attacks made possible by Meltdown/Spectre
Researchers from MIT have developed a new security system that has been shown to outperform Intel's own approach at preventing so-called 'timing attacks' made possible by vulnerabilities like Meltdown and Spectre. (2018-10-18)

Activated T-cells drive post-heart attack heart failure
Chronic inflammation after a heart attack can promote heart failure and death. University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers have now shown that activated T-cells -- part of the immune system's inflammatory response -- are both necessary and sufficient to produce such heart failure. (2017-02-27)

In older adults, fluctuating sense of control linked to cognitive ability
Everyone has moments when they feel more in control of their lives than at other times. New research from North Carolina State University shows that this sense of control fluctuates more often, and more quickly, than previously thought - and that this sense of control may actively affect cognitive abilities. (2012-02-13)

A deep male voice helps women remember
Men take note: If you want women to remember, speak to them in a low pitch voice. Then, they may rate you as a potential mate. That's according to a new study by scientists from the University of Aberdeen, UK. Their work shows for the first time that a low masculine voice is important for both mate choice and the accuracy of women's memory. The research is published online in Springer's journal, Memory & Cognition. (2011-09-12)

Researchers achieve multifunctional solid-state quantum memory
Research team from CAS Key Lab of Quantum Information developed multi-degree-of-freedom multiplexed solid-state quantum memory and demonstrate photon pulse operation functions with time and frequency degree-of-freedoms. (2018-08-24)

The human brain works backwards to retrieve memories
When we remember a past event, the human brain reconstructs that experience in reverse order, according to a new study at the University of Birmingham. (2019-01-14)

The genetic signature of memory
Despite their importance in memory, the human cortex and subcortex display a distinct collection of 'gene signatures.' The work recently published in eNeuro increases our understanding of how the brain creates memories and identifies potential genes for further investigation. (2019-12-09)

Building stress-resistant memories
Though it's widely assumed that stress zaps a person's ability to recall memory, it doesn't have that effect when memory is tested immediately after a taxing event, and when subjects have engaged in a highly effective learning technique, a new study reports. (2016-11-24)

Taking photos of experiences boosts visual memory, impairs auditory memory
A quick glance at any social media platform will tell you that people love taking photos of their experiences -- whether they're lying on the beach, touring a museum, or just waiting in line at the grocery store. New research shows that choosing to take photos may actually help us remember the visual details of our encounters. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2017-06-26)

Better physical fitness and lower aortic stiffness key to slower brain aging
The rate of decline in certain aspects of memory may be explained by a combination of overall physical fitness and the stiffness of the central arteries, researchers from Swinburne's Centre for Human Psychopharmacology have found. (2018-06-12)

Mild traumatic brain injury causes long-term damage in mice
A new Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology study in mice found that mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) can precipitate not only acute damage but also a lifelong degenerative process. (2017-12-14)

Writing the future of rewritable memory
Scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada have created the most dense, solid-state memory in history that could soon exceed the capabilities of current hard drives by 1,000 times. New technique leads to the densest solid-state memory ever created. (2018-07-23)

Research shows pesticides influence bee learning and memory
A large-scale study published by researchers from Royal Holloway University of London has drawn together the findings of a decade of agrochemical research to confirm that pesticides used in crop protection have a significant negative impact on the learning and memory abilities of bees. (2018-07-11)

Artificial Intelligence beats us in chess, but not in memory
A new piece of research shows that the brain strategy for storing memories may lead to imperfect memories, but in turn, allows it to store more memories, and with less hassle than AI. The new study, carried out by SISSA scientists in collaboration with Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience & Centre for Neural Computation, Trondheim, Norway, has just been published in Physical Review Letters. (2021-01-15)

NUS researchers unravel new insights into how brain beats distractions to retain memories
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have recently discovered a mechanism that could explain how the brain retains working memory when faced with distractions. These findings could endow cognitive flexibility to neural networks used for artificial intelligence. (2017-10-31)

Memory transferred between snails
Memories can be transferred between organisms by extracting ribonucleic acid (RNA) from a trained animal and injecting it into an untrained animal, as demonstrated in a study of sea snails published in eNeuro. The research provides new clues in the search for the physical basis of memory. (2018-05-14)

Memory ensembles
For over forty years, neuro-scientists have been interested in the biological mechanisms underlying the storage of the information that our brain records every day. Today, a team of the University of Geneva demonstrates how the brain regulates the size of the neuronal ensembles that reflect the memory trace to optimize performance. By targeting neurons in the hippocampus, the scientists show that it is possible to inhibit -- or on the contrary to resurface -- a memory. (2016-02-11)

Mindfulness may help reduce cravings for food and drugs, says review
Mindfulness strategies may help prevent or interrupt cravings for food and drugs, such as cigarettes and alcohol, by occupying short term memory, according to a new review from City, University of London. (2018-01-30)

Study: Running helps brain stave off effects of chronic stress
The study, newly published in the journal of Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, finds that running mitigates the negative impacts chronic stress has on the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory. (2018-02-14)

How the immune system remembers viruses
For a person to acquire immunity to a disease, T cells must develop into memory cells after contact with the pathogen. Until now, the number of cells that do this was believed to depend above all on the magnitude of the initial immune response. A team of researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now called this into question. (2020-11-02)

In animal studies, stimulating a brain pathway reduces depressive behavior
Neurobiology researchers have identified a pathway in brain circuitry that, when stimulated, leads to 'antidepressive' behavior in animals. If such brain stimulation proves to have similar effects in people, it may eventually lead to a novel treatment for depression. (2018-04-16)

Memory training for the immune system
The immune system will memorize the pathogen after an infection and can therefore react promptly after reinfection with the same pathogen. Now, scientists at the University of Würzburg have deciphered new details of this process. (2020-09-28)

Different neural strategies for junior high school male and female English learners
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University studied the neural response of Japanese junior high school students learning English as a second language, while listening to English sentences. More proficient boys showed more activation in parts of the brain associated with grammatical rules (syntax); girls used a wider range of language information, including speech sounds (phonology) and meaning of words and sentences (semantics). These discoveries may help optimize how boys and girls are taught English. (2018-03-23)

Dementia: New insights into causes of loss of orientation
The University of Exeter Medical School led two studies, each of which moves us a step closer to understanding the onset of dementia, and potentially to paving the way for future therapies. (2016-01-12)

Children can have a better memory than adults (at least sometimes)
Believe it or not, a 5-year-old could beat most adults on a recognition memory test, at least under specific conditions, according to a new study. These findings run counter to what has been known for years from memory research - namely, that memory develops from early childhood to young adulthood, with young adults having much better memory than children. (2004-07-21)

Think you know how to improve your memory? Think again
Research from Katherine Duncan at the University of Toronto suggests we may have to rethink how we improve memory. She has found our brains have particular states known as formation and recall. Optimal formation is best achieved when accompanied by novelty whereas familiarity leads to a recall state, hindering the goal. Duncan hopes these findings will one day help us to improve our memories and possibly offer insight into why diseases involving memory loss happen. (2017-05-31)

The adolescent brain is adapted to learning
Teenagers are often portrayed as seeking immediate gratification, but new work suggests that their sensitivity to reward could be part of an evolutionary adaptation to learn from their environment. In a Neuron study publishing Oct. 5, adolescents performed better than adults in a picture-based game that required learning from positive and negative reinforcement cues. The hippocampus and striatum were associated with this learning circuit in the teen brain. (2016-10-05)

High-resolution brain imaging provides clues about memory loss in older adults
As we get older, it's not uncommon to experience 'senior moments.' But currently, it's difficult to determine which memory lapses are normal parts of aging and which may signal the early stages of a severe disorder like Alzheimer's disease. In a study appearing March 7 in the journal Neuron, researchers report that high-resolution functional brain imaging can be used to show some of the underlying causes for memory proficiency differences between older and younger adults. (2018-03-07)

What is your memory style?
Why is it that some people have richly detailed recollection of past experiences (episodic memory), while others tend to remember just the facts without details (semantic memory)? A research team from the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences has shown for the first time that these different ways of experiencing the past are associated with distinct brain connectivity patterns that may be inherent to the individual and suggest a life-long 'memory trait'. (2015-12-10)

Deep-brain exploration with nanomaterial
Studying deep brain tissues noninvasively is difficult. Now RIKEN scientists in Japan have developed a way to send light deep into the brain without invasive optical fibers. The method uses infrared light outside the head to activate upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). When these nanoparticles absorb near-infrared laser light, they emit visible photons to deep areas in the brain, allowing remote optogenetic stimulation or inhibition of neurons in the brain. (2018-02-08)

Can sleep quality and burnout affect shift-work nurses' job performance?
In a Journal of Advanced Nursing study, female gender and personal burnout were linked with impaired sleep quality among nurses. (2017-11-22)

Who has the better memory -- men or women?
In the battle of the sexes, women have long claimed that they can remember things better and longer than men can. A new study proves that middle-aged women outperform age-matched men on all memory measures, although memory does decline as women enter postmenopause. The study is being published online today in Menopause, the journal of the North American Menopause Society. (2016-11-09)

Endocannabinoid system, a target to improve cognitive disorders in models of Down syndrome
A study by the Neuropharmacology Laboratory-NeuroPhar of the Department of Experimental and Health Sciences (DCEXS) at UPF reveals the involvement of the endocannabinoid system in cognitive disorders in mouse models of Down syndrome. The work, led by Andrés Ozaita and Rafael Maldonado, which has been published in the journal Neurobiology of Disease, also identifies cannabinoid receptor type-1 (CB1) as a potential treatment target. (2019-02-06)

One-month worth of memory training results in 30 minutes
A significant part of working memory training effects is a result of a fast development of task-specific strategies during training, rather than an increase in working memory capacity. (2018-03-07)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.