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Popular Working Memory News and Current Events, Working Memory News Articles.
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Men take shortcuts, while women follow well-known routes
When navigating in a known environment, men prefer to take shortcuts to reach their destination more quickly, while women tend to use routes they know. This is according to Alexander Boone of UC Santa Barbara in the US who is lead author of a study that investigated the different ways in which men and women navigate. The research is published in Springer's journal Memory & Cognition. (2018-05-23)

Automated detection of focal epileptic seizures in a sentinel area of the human brain
In a first-in-humans pilot study, researchers have identified a sentinel area of the brain that may give an early warning before clinical seizure manifestations from focal epilepsy appear. They have also validated an algorithm that can automatically detect that early warning. These two findings offer the possibility of squelching a focal epilepsy seizure -- before the patient feels any symptoms -- through neurostimulation of the sentinel area of the brain. (2018-08-17)

It's not your fault -- Your brain is self-centered
You're in the middle of a conversation and suddenly turn away because you heard your name. While this 'cocktail party effect' of turning our attention toward self-related stimulation is well-known, scientist don't know if something similar happens inside our heads. By testing for 'self-referential bias' in working memory, Duke researchers are starting to understand how our brains make us naturally self-centered. (2019-03-13)

Study links severe childhood deprivation to neuropsychological difficulties in adulthood
A team of researchers from the University of Southampton, the University of Bath and King's College London, including Dennis Golm from the University of Southampton, have provided compelling evidence of the impact of adversity in childhood on neuropsychological functioning in adulthood. They also showed that neuropsychological difficulties may explain why early adversity is linked to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in later life. (2020-05-22)

Mediterranean-style diet linked to better thinking skills in later life
People who eat a Mediterranean-style diet--particularly one rich in green leafy vegetables and low in meat--are more likely to stay mentally sharp in later life, a study shows. Closely adhering to a Mediterranean diet was associated with higher scores on a range of memory and thinking tests among adults in their late 70s, the research found. The study found no link, however, between the Mediterranean-style diet and better brain health. (2021-02-10)

Men forget most
Your suspicions have finally been confirmed. Men forget more than women do. Nine out of 10 men have problems with remembering names and dates, according to an analysis of a large Norwegian population-based health study. (2014-01-22)

Rescheduling of some Beagle 2 'cruise check-out' tests
The instruments on board ESA's mission to Mars, Mars Express, are in the process of being tested to verify that they have survived the launch successfully and will work properly. One of these tests on the Mars Express lander, Beagle 2, has been postponed to the first week of July. (2003-06-24)

Believing is seeing
Folk wisdom usually has it that (2009-09-02)

Even mild physical activity immediately improves memory function, UCI-led study finds
Researchers at the University of California, Irvine, and Japan's University of Tsukuba found that even very light workouts can increase the connectivity between parts of the brain responsible for memory formation and storage. (2018-09-24)

Making moves and memories, are they connected?
Researchers report the first direct evidence that the cerebellum does more than just control muscle activity. It also plays a role in cognitive functions. (2018-11-15)

Slime mold absorbs substances to memorize them
In 2016, CNRS scientists demonstrated that the slime mold Physarum polycephalum, a single-cell organism without a nervous system, could learn to no longer fear a harmless but aversive substance and could transmit this knowledge to a fellow slime mold. In a new study, a team from CNRS and the Université Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier has shown what might support this memory and in fact it could be the aversive substance itself! (2019-04-22)

Natural killer cells also have a memory function
Good news for the human immune system: researchers from MedUni Vienna's Departments of Dermatology and Surgery have managed to ascribe an immunological memory function to a subset of cytotoxic NK cells, which have hitherto been regarded as antigen-non-specific. (2020-10-19)

Can menopause be blamed for increased forgetfulness and lack of attention?
If you're a bit more forgetful or having more difficulty processing complex concepts than in the past, the problem may be your menopause stage. A new study claims that menopause stage is a key determinant of cognition and, contrary to previous studies, shows that certain cognitive declines may continue into the postmenopause period. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-01-13)

SUTD research team extends 4D printing to nanophotonics
The newly developed shape memory polymer resist which allows for high-resolution 4D printing, promises a platform for information hiding for optical anti-counterfeiting and tunable photonic devices. (2021-01-22)

Adult survivors of childhood eye cancer experience few cognitive or social setbacks
Adult survivors of retinoblastoma, a type of eye cancer that usually develops in early childhood, have few cognitive or social problems decades following their diagnosis and treatment. (2014-11-24)

Study finds nicotine changes marijuana's effect on the brain
How scientists study the effects of marijuana on the brain is changing. Until recently marijuana research largely excluded tobacco users from its participant pool, but scientists at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas have found reason to abandon this practice, uncovering significant differences in the brains of individuals who use both tobacco and marijuana and the brains of those who only use marijuana. (2015-08-18)

Acupuncture may help to improve dementia precursor -- impaired memory
Acupuncture may help to improve the subtle memory loss that precedes the development of dementia, otherwise known as mild cognitive impairment, or MCI for short, suggests a review of the available published evidence in Acupuncture in Medicine. (2016-08-04)

Compound from chicory reveals possible treatment strategy for neurodegenerative disorders
In a new research report published online in The FASEB Journal, scientists used mice to show that chicoric acid, a component of chicory, may help reduce memory impairment associated with Alzheimer's disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative diseases. (2017-01-10)

Study finds hub linking movement and motivation in the brain
Detailed observations in the lateral septum indicate that the well-connected region processes movement, and reward information to help direct behavior. (2019-09-19)

Oink, oink makes the pig
In a new study, neuroscientists at TU Dresden demonstrated that the use of gestures and pictures makes foreign language teaching in primary schools more effective and sustainable. They thus provide important fundamental findings for the development of modern teaching methods. (2020-05-13)

Compounds from apples may boost brain function
Natural compounds found in apples and other fruits may help stimulate the production of new brain cells, which may have implications for learning and memory, according to a new study in mice published in Stem Cell Reports. (2021-02-11)

High cholesterol intake and eggs do not increase risk of memory disorders
A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating one egg every day, are not associated with an elevated risk of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, no association was found in persons carrying the APOE4 gene variant that affects cholesterol metabolism and increases the risk of memory disorders. APOE4 is common in Finland. The findings were published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. (2017-01-09)

Resistive memory components the computer industry can't resist
For years, the computer industry has sought memory technologies with higher endurance, lower cost, and better energy efficiency than commercial flash memories. Now, an international collaboration of scientists may have solved many of those challenges with the discovery of thin, molecular films that can store information. (2017-10-23)

Research sheds new light on how the brain forms and recalls memories
Neuroscientists at the University of Birmingham have proved how different parts of the human brain work together to create and retrieve episodic memory. (2019-10-10)

Working long hours linked to depression in women
Women who work more than 55 hours a week are at a higher risk of depression but this is not the case for men, according to a new UCL-led study with Queen Mary University of London. (2019-02-25)

Research shows impact of poverty on children's brain activity
New research reveals the impact of poverty on children's brain activity. Researchers studied the brain function of children aged between four months and four years in rural India, and compared their results with children from families in Midwest America. They found that children in India from lower-income backgrounds, where mothers also had a low level of education, had weaker brain activity and were more likely to be distracted. (2019-04-02)

Aging gracefully: Study identifies factors for healthy memory at any age
University of Alberta neuroscientists have identified different factors for maintaining healthy memory and for avoiding memory decline in those over age 55, according to a new study. The results have implications for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease through targeted early intervention efforts. (2019-04-10)

Next-generation computer chip with two heads
EPFL engineers have developed a computer chip that combines two functions - logic operations and data storage - into a single architecture, paving the way to more efficient devices. Their technology is particularly promising for applications relying on artificial intelligence. (2020-11-05)

Engineers develop new methods to speed up simulations in computational grand challenge
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have developed a new family of methods to significantly increase the speed of time-resolved numerical simulations in computational grand challenge problems. Such problems often arise from the high-resolution approximation of the partial differential equations governing complex flows of fluids or plasmas. The breakthrough could be applied to simulations that include millions or billions of variables, including turbulence simulations. (2015-03-26)

Non-motor microtubule-associated protein in maintaining synaptic plasticity
University of Tsukuba Faculty of Medicine Professor Yosuke Takei, in a joint study with the University of Tokyo, has for the first time clarified the mechanism in the brain that inhibits derailment of the receptor transport that supports memory. (2016-02-08)

Brief exposure to performance-enhancing drugs may be permanently 'remembered' by muscles
Brief exposure to anabolic steroids may have long lasting, possibly permanent, performance-enhancing effects, shows a study published today [28 October] in The Journal of Physiology. (2013-10-27)

Orientation without a master plan
Human spatial memory is made up of numerous individual maps. (2016-09-06)

New MIT tool probes brain circuits
Researchers at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT report in the Jan. 24 online edition of Science that they have created a way to see, for the first time, the effect of blocking and unblocking a single neural circuit in a living animal. (2008-01-24)

Products that reversibly change shape with temperature may revolutionize medicine
New research highlights the capability of reversible shape-memory polymers to change their shape when heated to body temperature and then switch back to their original shape when cooled to room temperature. (2015-03-16)

Study examines concussion, cognition, brain changes in retired NFL players
A preliminary study of retired National Football League players suggests that history of concussion with loss of consciousness may be a risk factor for increased brain atrophy in the area involved with memory storage and impaired memory performance later in life, according to an article published online by JAMA Neurology. (2015-05-18)

Detecting misinformation can improve memory later on
Exposure to false information about an event usually makes it more difficult for people to recall the original details, but new research suggests that there may be times when misinformation actually boosts memory. Research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, shows that people who actually notice that the misinformation is inconsistent with the original event have better memory for the event compared with people who never saw the misinformation in the first place. (2017-01-03)

Brain waves may be spread by weak electrical field
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University may have found a new way information is communicated throughout the brain. Their discovery could lead to identifying possible new targets to investigate brain waves associated with memory and epilepsy and better understand healthy physiology. (2016-01-14)

Rosemary aroma can aid children's working memory
Exposure to the aroma of rosemary essential oil can significantly enhance working memory in children. (2017-05-02)

Food comas and long-term memories -- New research points to an appetizing connection
There may be a connection between food comas -- resting after eating -- and the formation of long-term memories, a team of neuroscientists concludes based on its study on brain activity in sea slugs. (2019-10-10)

Bee brain/human brain: New link
In a discovery which could open new avenues for understanding of the brain, researchers have found similarities between the brain activity of honey bees and humans. The research revealed that alpha oscillations in bees (the wave-like electrical activity brains generate) have similar properties as in our human brains. (2020-02-25)

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