Popular World Record News and Current Events

Popular World Record News and Current Events, World Record News Articles.
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Sudden aging
Coralline red algae have existed for 130 million years, in other words since the Cretaceous Period, the time of the dinosaurs. At least this was the established view of palaeontologists all over the world until now. However, this classification will now have to be revised after fossils discovered by researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg in conjunction with researchers at La Trobe University in Melbourne prove that coralline red algae existed as far back as 430 million years ago. (2019-01-16)

What did Earth's ancient magnetic field look like?
New work from Carnegie's Peter Driscoll suggests Earth's ancient magnetic field was significantly different than the present day field, originating from several poles rather than the familiar two. Then, shortly after our planet's core solidified, Driscoll's work predicts that Earth's magnetic field transitioned to a 'strong,' two-pole one. (2016-06-24)

Was that climate change?
A new four-step 'framework' aims to test the contribution of climate change to record-setting extreme weather events. (2017-04-24)

New screening tool can improve the quality of life for epilepsy patients with sleep apnea
Rutgers researchers have developed a tool to help neurologists screen for obstructive sleep apnea in people with epilepsy whose seizures can be magnified by sleep disorders. (2018-09-27)

Study provides insights for combating devastating amphibian disease
Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis fungus, is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. (2017-11-14)

New record set for carbon-carbon single bond length
A stable organic compound has been synthesized with a record length for the bond between its carbon atoms, exceeding the assumed limit. (2018-03-08)

Research shows how 'Mallard' dye fills need for speed
Scientists at the University of York have developed a new medical tool which could help surgeons carrying out complex procedures in the operating room. Researchers have developed a dye which provides a quick and accurate method of checking heparin levels in the blood. (2013-02-14)

Arctic wintertime sea ice extent is among lowest on record
Sea ice in the Arctic grew to its annual maximum extent last week, and joined 2015, 2016 and 2017 as the four lowest maximum extents on record, according to scientists at the NASA-supported National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and NASA. (2018-03-23)

Brexit is one of the greatest threats to women's rights
Brexit is one the greatest threats to women's rights and social inclusion, a new study in the Journal of Social Policy and Society reports. (2018-01-25)

When did flowers originate?
Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research. (2018-02-04)

Prehistoric squid was last meal of newborn ichthyosaur 200 million years ago
Scientists from the UK have identified the smallest and youngest specimen of Ichthyosaurus communis on record and found an additional surprise preserved in its stomach. (2017-10-03)

Unraveling truly one-dimensional carbon solids
Elemental carbon appears in many different forms, including diamond and graphite. In an international collaboration, researchers at the University of Vienna, led by Thomas Pichler, have succeeded in developing a novel route for the bulk production of carbon chains composed of more than 6,000 carbon atoms, using thin double-walled carbon nanotubes as protective hosts for the chains. These findings represent an elegant forerunner towards the final goal of carbyne's bulk production and will be published in Nature Materials. (2016-04-04)

Record jump in 2014-2016 global temperatures largest since 1900
Global surface temperatures surged by a record amount from 2014 to 2016, boosting the total amount of warming since the start of the last century by more than 25 percent in just three years, according to a new University of Arizona-led paper. The research is the first to quantify the record temperature spike of an additional 0.43 degrees F (0.24 C) in just three years and to identify the fundamental reason for the jump. (2018-01-24)

Researchers reveal when global warming first appeared
Human caused climate change is increasingly apparent today through multiple lines of evidence. But now researchers have revealed for the first time when and where the first clear signs of global warming appeared in the temperature record and where those signals are likely to manifest in extreme rainfall events in the very near future. (2015-09-22)

Turtle shells help decode complex links between modern, fossil species
A new study by Florida Museum of Natural History researcher Natasha Vitek shows how scientists can use animals' physical features -- also known as morphology -- to make connections between a modern species and its fossilized relatives, even if they look strikingly different. (2018-03-28)

New study identifies thermometer for global ocean
There's a new way to measure the average temperature of the ocean thanks to researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. (2018-01-03)

2017 was the warmest year on record for the global ocean
2017 was the warmest year on record for the global ocean according to an updated ocean analysis from Institute of Atmospheric Physics/Chinese Academy of Science. (2018-01-18)

Burgundy wine grapes tell climate story, show warming accelerated in past 30 years
A new series of dates of grape harvest covering the past 664 years is the latest line of evidence confirming how unusual the climate of the past 30 years has been. The record shows wine grapes in Burgundy, France, have been picked 13 days earlier on average since 1988 than they were in the previous six centuries, pointing to the region's hotter and drier climate in recent years. The results are published in Climate of the Past. (2019-08-29)

Hot springs microbes hold key to dating sedimentary rocks, researchers say
Scientists studying microbial communities and the growth of sedimentary rock at Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park have made a surprising discovery about the geological record of life and the environment. Their discovery could affect how certain sequences of sedimentary rock are dated, and how scientists might search for evidence of life on other planets. (2008-01-22)

Neuro chip records brain cell activity
In order to understand how the brain controls functions, such as simple reflexes or learning and memory, we must be able to record the activity of large networks and groups of neurons. Conventional methods have allowed scientists to record the activity of neurons for minutes, but a new technology, developed by University of Calgary researchers, known as a bionic hybrid neuro chip, is able to record activity in animal brain cells for weeks at a much higher resolution. (2016-10-26)

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles
The Arctic sea ice maximum extent and Antarctic minimum extent are both record lows this year. Combined, sea ice numbers are at their lowest point since satellites began to continuously measure sea ice in 1979. (2017-03-22)

2017 hurricane season follows year of extremes
2016 hurricane season started in January and ended 318 days later in late-November. Hurricane Matthew was the first Category 5 in a decade, the longest stretch without one since 1950. (2017-06-01)

Many species now going extinct may vanish without a fossil trace
Scientists struggle to compare the magnitude of Earth's ongoing sixth mass-extinction event with the five great die-offs of prehistory. A new study by three paleontologists shows that the species now perishing may vanish without a permanent trace -- and earlier extinctions may be underestimated as well. (2016-03-21)

Protecting patient privacy the new fashioned way
In a study published in the September-October issue of the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, Jeff Friedlin, D.O., of the Regenstrief Institute Inc. and the Indiana University School of Medicine, writes about the Medical De-identification System (MeDS), a highly accurate and speedy computer software program he has developed and successfully tested for de-identifying patient information while retaining the essential data key to medical research. (2008-09-25)

Primary care practices use 4 complementary methods to identify high-risk patients
Risk stratified care management -- assigning a patient to a risk category on which care is based -- is increasingly viewed as a way to improve care and reduce costs. This research appears in the September/October 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. (2017-09-12)

Plant-eating dinosaur discovered in Antarctica
For the first time, the presence of large bodied herbivorous dinosaurs in Antarctica has been recorded. Until now, remains of sauropoda had been recovered from all continental landmasses, except Antarctica. Dr. Ignacio Alejandro Cerda and his team's identification of the remains of the sauropod dinosaur suggests that advanced titanosaurs achieved a global distribution at least by the Late Cretaceous. Their work has just been published online in Springer's journal, Naturwissenschaften - The Science of Nature. (2011-12-19)

Health care reform and EHR design should be built around patients' goals
Meaningful reform of primary care should not only address the provision, documentation and payment of care; it should be based on patients' goals for their lives and health, with corresponding redesign of electronic health records. (2018-03-13)

Evolution: South Africa's hominin record is a fair-weather friend
The fossil record of early hominins in South Africa is biased towards periods of drier climate, suggests a study of cave deposits published online today in Nature. This finding suggests there are gaps in the fossil record, potentially obscuring evolutionary patterns and affecting our understanding of both the habitats and dietary behaviours of early hominins in this region. South Africa's highest concentration of early hominin fossils comes from the 'Cradle of Humankind' caves northwest of Johannesburg. (2018-11-21)

Forest soundscapes monitor conservation efforts inexpensively, effectively
Recordings of the sounds in tropical forests could unlock secrets about biodiversity and aid conservation efforts around the world, according to a perspective paper published in Science. (2019-01-03)

Unprecedented number of warm-water species moved northward during marine heatwave
A UC Davis study documents an unprecedented number of southern marine species moving northward into California and as far north as Oregon during the 2014-2016 marine heatwave. Of 67 rare, warm-water species sightings observed, 37 had never been documented so far north before. (2019-03-12)

NASA looks at extreme Florida rainfall by satellite
Extremely heavy rain has recently fallen over Florida and the Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite looked at that some of that rainfall on June 7. Rainfall records were broken on that date as the GPM satellite passed overhead from space. (2017-06-08)

Insects took off when they evolved wings
Now buzzing and whizzing around every continent, insects were mysteriously scarce in the fossil record until 325 million years ago -- when they first took flight and, according to a new study, evolutionarily took off. (2018-01-23)

Risk of extreme weather events higher if Paris Agreement goals aren't met
The Paris Agreement has aspirational goals of limiting temperature rise that won't be met by current commitments. That difference could make the world another degree warmer and considerably more prone to extreme weather. (2018-02-14)

Plants colonized the earth 100 million years earlier than previously thought
A new study on the timescale of plant evolution, led by the University of Bristol, has concluded that the first plants to colonise the Earth originated around 500 million years ago -- 100 million years earlier than previously thought. (2018-02-19)

Wireless 'pacemaker for the brain' could offer new treatment for neurological disorders
A new neurostimulator developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can listen to and stimulate electric current in the brain at the same time, potentially delivering fine-tuned treatments to patients with diseases like epilepsy and Parkinson's. (2018-12-31)

NASA's GPM catches line of strong storms responsible for tornadoes in eastern US
On Sunday, April 15, a line of strong storms at one point stretched from the Florida Straits below the Florida Keys all the way up the East Coast and into Ohio. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the severe storms as it passed overhead. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA. (2018-04-17)

Improving the quality of high altitude medicine
Study location, exact altitude and a detailed profile of the study participants are just three of altogether 42 factors which are to be included in any future study, project description or publication related to high altitude medicine. A select group of experts, including high altitude physicians from all over the world, were invited to define which factors were most pertinent for inclusion in the guidelines by forming a consensus through multiple rounds of discussion. (2018-02-26)

UT Austin study raises question: Why are fossilized hairs so rare?
New research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that when it comes to preserving body parts, fossilized hair is rare--five times rarer than feathers--despite being an important tool for understanding ancient species. This finding has researchers trying to determine if the lack of hair in the fossil record has to do with physical traits that might make it more difficult for hair to fossilize, or an issue with scientists' collection techniques that could lead to them missing important finds. (2017-09-07)

Researchers reveal prostate tumors 'fed' by fatty acids
An international multidisciplinary study initiated by Melbourne scientists has shown a link between prostate cancer and the uptake of fatty acids by cancer cells. The findings point to a possible therapeutic target for this common cancer. (2019-02-06)

Why don't turtles still have tail spikes?
In a study covering 300 million years of evolutionary history, researchers from North Carolina State University and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences found four necessary components to tail weapon development: size, armor, herbivory and thoracic stiffness. (2018-01-17)

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