Current Aaas News and Events

Current Aaas News and Events, Aaas News Articles.
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Diversity in policing can improve police-civilian interactions
Black and Hispanic officers make far fewer stops and arrests and use less force than white officers, especially against Black civilians, when facing otherwise common circumstances. Hispanic officers also engage in less enforcement activity. Female officers of all races also use less force than males. (2021-02-11)

Northwestern scholar to talk about science of teams in space at AAAS
Noshir Contractor, along with Leslie DeChurch and NASA researcher Suzanne Bell, developed a computational model that predicts interpersonal conflicts between team members (such as astronauts) with 75-80% accuracy and prescribes interventions to repair their interactions and relationships. (2021-02-10)

New clues to how SARS-CoV-2 infects cells
The molecular details of how SARS-CoV-2 enters cells and infects them are still not clear. Researchers at Uppsala University have tested the bioinformatic predictions made by another research group and have identified receptors that could be important players in the process. The results are presented in the journal Science Signaling and at the AAAS Annual Meeting held this week. (2021-02-08)

What happens in the mouth ... doesn't stay in the mouth
The healthy human oral microbiome consists of not just clean teeth and firm gums, but also energy-efficient bacteria living in an environment rich in blood vessels that enables the organisms' constant communication with immune-system cells and proteins. A growing body of evidence has shown that this system that seems so separate from the rest of our bodies is actually highly influential on, and influenced by, our overall health. (2021-02-08)

Adolescent involvement with firearms linked to gun violence in adulthood
A new study by Northwestern University researchers finds involvement with firearms by high-risk youth is associated with firearm violence during adulthood. 'Association of Firearm Access, Use, and Victimization During Adolescence with Firearm Perpetration During Adulthood in a 16-year Longitudinal Study of Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System' will publish in JAMA Network Open at 10 a.m. CST, Thursday, Feb. 4. (2021-02-04)

Squid-inspired robot swims with nature's most efficient marine animals
Scientists at the University of Southampton and University of Edinburgh have developed a flexible underwater robot that can propel itself through water in the same style as nature's most efficient swimmer - the Aurelia aurita jellyfish. (2021-01-20)

No. 1 news release on EurekAlert!'s 2020 Trending List smashes previous all-time record for visits
The most-visited news release on EurekAlert! in 2020 racked up just under 1 million hits -- the most in the site's near 25-year history. (2020-12-23)

Irreversible hotter and drier climate over inner East Asia
Researchers warn that heatwaves and concurrent droughts of Mongolia's semi-arid plateau have increased significantly during the past two decades, with troubling implications for the future. The change also has ramifications for atmospheric conditions across the Northern Hemisphere. (2020-11-26)

Past is key to predicting future climate, scientists say
In a review paper published in the journal Science, a group of climate experts make the case for including paleoclimate data in the development of climate models. Such models are used globally to assess the impacts of human-caused greenhouse gas emissions, predict scenarios for future climate and propose strategies for mitigation. (2020-11-05)

Physical force alone spurs gene expression, study reveals
Cells will ramp up gene expression in response to physical forces alone, a new study finds. Gene activation, the first step of protein production, starts less than one millisecond after a cell is stretched -- hundreds of times faster than chemical signals can travel, the researchers report. (2020-04-01)

Bumblebees can experience an object using one sense and later recognize it using another
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London and Macquarie University in Sydney have published new work in the journal Science showing that bumblebees can find objects in the dark they've only seen before. (2020-02-20)

Researchers create new tools to monitor water quality, measure water insecurity
A wife-husband team will present both high-tech and low-tech solutions for improving water security at this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Seattle on Sunday, Feb. 16. Northwestern University's Sera Young and Julius Lucks come from different ends of the science spectrum but meet in the middle to provide critical new information to approach this global issue. (2020-02-16)

Energized by enzymes -- nature's catalysts
Scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are using a custom virtual reality app to design an artificial enzyme that converts carbon dioxide to formate, a kind of fuel. PNNL's Wendy Shaw and Aaron Appel organized a session at the 2020 #AAASmtg and invited colleagues from across the nation to share what they've learned. (2020-02-15)

Northwestern researcher examines substance use disorders in at-risk youth
Using data from the Northwestern Juvenile Project, Linda Teplin of Northwestern University will examine the persistence and progression of substance use disorders -- including opioid use disorder -- in delinquent youth in a talk at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting in Seattle on Friday, Feb. 14. (2020-02-14)

Mapping the landscape of citizen science
A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has found that citizen science is reshaping research. It can greatly facilitate large-scale research by providing opportunities to study more topics while teaching people more about science and enhancing science education. The report is one of the first of its kind to examine the available information on citizen science projects and, through peer-reviewed evidence, clearly identify trends, weaknesses and opportunities for growth. (2020-02-14)

Algorithms 'consistently' more accurate than people in predicting recidivism, study says
In a study with potentially far-reaching implications for criminal justice in the United States, a team of California researchers has found that algorithms are significantly more accurate than humans in predicting which defendants will later be arrested for a new crime. The researchers -- from Stanford University and the University of California, Berkeley -- found that risk assessment tools approached 90% accuracy in predicting which defendants might be arrested again, compared to about 60% for human prediction. (2020-02-14)

Computer-generated genomes
Professor Beat Christen, ETH Zurich to speak in the AAAS 2020 session, 'Synthetic Biology: Digital Design of Living Systems.' Christen will describe how computational algorithms paired with chemical DNA synthesis enable digital manufacturing of biological systems up to the size of entire microbial genomes. He will present insights related to the design, building and testing of a computer-generated bacterial genome and discuss how algorithms simplify the synthesis of genomes to advance understanding of living systems. (2020-02-14)

Designer proteins
David Baker, Professor of Biochemistry at the University of Washington to speak at the AAAS 2020 session, 'Synthetic Biology: Digital Design of Living Systems.' Prof. Baker to identify how algorithmic processes such as de novo design, predict protein structures, protein folding mechanisms, and new protein functions. (2020-02-07)

2019 EurekAlert! Trending Release List the most international ever
The EurekAlert! 2019 Trending Release List is the most geographically diverse to date, with more than half of the top 10 from outside the United States. (2019-12-26)

New metasurface design can control optical fields in three dimensions
A team led by scientists at the University of Washington has designed and tested a 3D-printed metamaterial that can manipulate light with nanoscale precision. As they report in a paper published Oct. 4 in Science Advances, their designed optical element focuses light to discrete points in a 3D helical pattern. (2019-10-04)

'How We Respond' spotlights how US communities are addressing climate change impacts
Communities across the United States are working with scientists to respond to climate change impacts, shows a new report and multimedia resources developed by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). How We Respond shares details and perspectives from 18 communities using scientific information to adapt to climate change impacts and/or reduce greenhouse gas emissions. (2019-09-16)

Researchers uncover new cause of abdominal aortic aneurysm
Researchers have discovered that a family of lipids (fats) contribute to the development of a serious aortic disease, by driving clotting in the blood vessel wall. (2019-04-04)

Ancient extinct sloth tooth in Belize tells story of creature's last year
Some 27,000 years ago in central Belize, a giant sloth was thirsty. It eventually found water in a deep sinkhole, but it was the creature's last drink. A new analysis of its tooth offers insight into the landscape it inhabited and what it ate its last year of life. (2019-02-27)

Children carry evidence of toxins from home flooring and furniture
Children living in homes with all vinyl flooring or flame-retardant chemicals in the sofa have significantly higher concentrations of potentially harmful semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in their blood or urine than children from homes where these materials are not present, according to new Duke University-led research. The researchers presented their findings Feb. 17 at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C. (2019-02-17)

How to feed the world by 2050? Recent breakthrough boosts plant growth by 40 percent
Recent advances to address hunger through agricultural discovery will be highlighted at this year's annual meeting of the AAAS. Session speaker and University of Illinois professor Donald Ort will discuss the global food security challenge and a recent breakthrough in Science that boosted crop growth by 40 percent by creating a shortcut for a glitch that plagues most food crops. (2019-02-16)

Is quantum computing scalable?
Debbie Leung, a fellow in CIFAR's Quantum Information Science program and a faculty member at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing, will discuss the challenges of scaling quantum computing at the AAAS meeting on Feb. 16. (2019-02-16)

Predicting climate change
Thomas Crowther, ETH Zurich identifies long-disappeared forests available for restoration across the world. In his AAAS session, Crowther describes how such an effort, could absorb as much as 135 gigatons of atmospheric carbon. Crowther will also describe data from thousands of soil samples collected by local scientists that reveal the world's most abundant population of soil organisms in arctic and sub-arctic regions and the most dominant populations of plants and animals in tropical regions. (2019-02-16)

Scholar to talk about household water insecurity
A Northwestern anthropology professor will discuss the first cross-culturally equivalent measurement of household water insecurity (2019-02-15)

Can we trust scientific discoveries made using machine learning?
Rice University statistician Genevera Allen is cautioning fellow scientists at the 2019 AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., not to make assumptions about the accuracy, uncertainty or reproducibility of scientific discoveries made with today's machine learning models. (2019-02-15)

The scientific tooth fairies of San Francisco
W. Thomas Boyce, co-director of the CIFAR program in Child & Brain Development and professor emeritus in the UCSF department of Pediatrics, will tell the tale of his time as California's tooth fairy and set the stage for a discussion of teeth as biomarkers in human health. (2019-02-15)

Brain-computer interface, promise of restoring communication discussed at AAAS presentation
Choosing the 'right' brain-computer interface that maximizes reliability of the neural control signal and minimizes fatigue and frustration is critical. Jonathan Brumberg of the University of Kansas will present on this subject and demonstrate a variety of brain-computer interfaces Feb. 17 at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C. (2019-02-15)

EarthScope announces top 10 discoveries list
What are the 10 most influential, revolutionary, unexpected, or just plain amazing discoveries from EarthScope's 15-year history? (2019-02-14)

Breaks in the blood-brain barrier can cause brains to get old before their time
Daniela Kaufer, a professor at UC Berkeley and fellow in the CIFAR Child & Brain Development program, has discovered one of the biological pathways that lead to age-related cognitive decline, and has found clues on how to reverse the aging process in the brain. (2019-02-14)

Get the latest on UVA's artificial pancreas with testing nearly complete
A University of Virginia School of Medicine researcher will provide updates on a UVA-developed artificial pancreas -- including early results from a nationwide clinical trial -- during a presentation at the AAAS Annual Meeting. The presentation from Boris Kovatchev, PhD, director of the UVA Center for Diabetes Technology, is scheduled for 1:30-2 p.m. Feb. 15. (2019-02-12)

Climate change: Scientists tap nature, space and society
Three scientists share their research from the natural, physical, and social sciences on novel responses to climate change during the 2019 AAAS Annual Meeting on February 16th, 2019 at 3:30 PM, Marriott Wardman Park, Delaware Suite. (2019-02-11)

Keeping SDGs from being a zero-sum game
Even as the world gets on the same sustainability page courtesy of the United Nation Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), those very goals can result in significant tradeoffs. Scientists suggest new ways to tackle unexpected or unintended consequences cropping up on the way to a better world at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting. (2019-02-11)

Workshop: Getting women due credit -- on the paper
Publish or perish is an adage with particular sting for women and other underrepresented scholars prone to not getting deserved credit on scientific papers. F&W scientists will provide perspective and pointers at the upcoming AAAS Annual Meeting. (2019-02-11)

75 science societies urge the education department to base Title IX sexual harassment regulations on evidence and science
The American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) today led 75 scientific societies in submitting comments on the US Department of Education's proposed changes to Title IX regulations. (2019-01-30)

News releases about health, Earth science and social sciences make up EurekAlert!'s 2018 trending news list
Health news occupied six of the 10 most-viewed news releases on EurekAlert! in 2018. The most popular news release, 'Study: Lead and other toxic metals found in e-cigarette 'vapors,'' submitted by Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health received 337,013 views. (2018-12-26)

Research pioneers
Five UC Santa Barbara professors join the ranks as Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for 2018. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers for 'their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished.' (2018-11-27)

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