Current Abrams News and Events

Current Abrams News and Events, Abrams News Articles.
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Commonly used antibiotic shows promise for combating Zika infections
Recently, National Institutes of Health researchers used a variety of advanced drug screening techniques to test out more than 10,000 compounds in search of a cure. To their surprise, they found that the widely used antibiotic methacycline was effective at preventing brain infections and reducing neurological problems associated with the virus in mice. (2020-11-24)

Protein in blood may predict prognosis, recovery from stroke
Researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida and collaborators have found that a biomarker in the blood may determine the extent of brain injury from different types of strokes and predict prognosis in these patients. Their findings are reported in Science Translational Medicine. (2020-11-11)

Cancer-fighting gene restrains 'jumping genes'
About half of all tumors have mutations of the gene p53, normally responsible for warding off cancer. Now, UT Southwestern scientists have discovered a new role for p53 in its fight against tumors: preventing retrotransposons, or ''jumping genes,'' from hopping around the human genome. In cells with missing or mutated p53, the team found, retrotransposons move and multiply more than usual. The finding could lead to new ways of detecting or treating cancers with p53 mutations. (2020-10-29)

New model examines how societal influences affect US political opinions
Northwestern University researchers have developed the first quantitative model that captures how politicized environments affect U.S. political opinion formation and evolution. (2020-10-02)

US political parties become extremist to get more votes
New mathematical modeling shows that US political parties are becoming increasingly polarized due to their quest for voters -- not because voters themselves are becoming more extremist. (2020-08-26)

Human milk based fortifiers improve health outcomes for the smallest premature babies
More than 380,000 babies are born prematurely in the United States each year, according to the March of Dimes. 'Preemies' can be severely underweight babies and struggle to get the nutrients they need from breast milk alone, so neonatal intensive care units provide an additional milk fortifier, either in the form of cow's milk or manufactured from donor breast milk, to keep them healthy. (2020-08-12)

Surface clean-up technology won't solve ocean plastic problem
Clean-up devices that collect waste from the ocean surface won't solve the plastic pollution problem, a new study shows. (2020-08-04)

Climate scientists increasingly ignore ecological role of indigenous peoples
In their zeal to promote the importance of climate change as an ecological driver, climate scientists increasingly are ignoring the profound role that indigenous peoples played in fire and vegetation dynamics, not only in the eastern United States but worldwide, according to a Penn State researcher. (2020-07-20)

Cannabis shows potential for mitigating sickle cell disease pain
Cannabis appears to be a safe and potentially effective treatment for the chronic pain that afflicts people with sickle cell disease, according to a new clinical trial co-led by University of California, Irvine researcher Kalpna Gupta and Dr. Donald Abrams of UC San Francisco. The findings appear in JAMA Network Open. (2020-07-17)

Coconut confusion reveals consumer conundrum
Coconut oil production may be more damaging to the environment than palm oil, researchers say. (2020-07-06)

Life expectancy crisis in the USA: The opioid crisis is not the decisive factor
Cardiovascular diseases -- rather than drug deaths due to the opioid crisis -- have the greatest impact on stagnating life expectancy in the USA. (2020-03-17)

Most young people do not vape, and even fewer vape regularly
While youth vaping rates have increased in recent years, most middle and high school students don't vape or smoke and very few vape or smoke daily, finds a study led by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health. (2020-01-27)

In Southeast Asia, illegal hunting is a more threat to wildlife than forest degradation
A new study carried out by the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in cooperation with the World Wide Fund for Nature Vietnam (WWF-Vietnam) and the Sabah Forestry Department of the Government of Malaysia suggests that for ground dwelling mammal and bird communities, illegal hunting using indiscriminate snares may be a more immediate threat than forest degradation through selective logging. (2019-10-30)

Big cities breed partners in crime
Researchers have long known that bigger cities disproportionately generate more crime. Now a new study from Northwestern University and the Santa Fe Institute explains why: It's easier for criminals to find collaborators. (2019-09-19)

Study: Bigger cities boost 'social crimes'
The same underlying mechanism that boosts urban innovation and startup businesses can also explain why certain types of crimes, like car theft and robbery, thrive in a larger population. (2019-09-17)

Deer browsing is not stopping the densification of Eastern forests
Selective browsing by white-tailed deer has been blamed by many for changing the character and composition of forest understories in the eastern US; however, its impact on the forest canopy was previously unknown. (2019-09-03)

Proposed gene therapy for a heart arrhythmia, based on models made from patient cells
Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital report creating the first human tissue model of an inherited heart arrhythmia, replicating two patients' abnormal heart rhythms in a dish, and then suppressing the arrhythmia with gene therapy in a mouse model. (2019-07-17)

Eastern forests shaped more by Native Americans' burning than climate change
Native Americans' use of fire to manage vegetation in what is now the Eastern United States was more profound than previously believed, according to a Penn State researcher who determined that forest composition change in the region was caused more by land use than climate change. (2019-05-21)

Women's leadership potential for top jobs overlooked in favor of men
The potential of women for leadership roles is being overlooked, while men benefit from the perception that they will grow into the role, new research from the University of Kent shows. (2019-05-14)

Brain response to mom's voice differs in kids with autism, Stanford study finds
For most children, the sound of their mother's voice triggers brain activity patterns distinct from those triggered by an unfamiliar voice. But the unique brain response to mom's voice is greatly diminished in children with autism, according to a new study from the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2019-02-26)

Mental health diagnoses among US children, youth continue to rise at alarming rate
The number of children and adolescents visiting the nation's emergency departments due to mental health concerns continued to rise at an alarming rate from 2012 through 2016, with mental health diagnoses for non-Latino blacks outpacing such diagnoses among youth of other racial/ethnic groups, according to a retrospective cross-sectional study presented during the American Academy of Pediatrics National Conference & Exhibition. (2018-11-02)

Assessing the current and future impact of biologics on pediatric asthma
Researchers have performed a comprehensive review of the current state and future potential of using biologic medications to treat asthma in children. (2018-09-25)

Clinton lost US election because Democrats were too inclusive -- study
Hillary Clinton may have lost out to Donald Trump in the battle for the US Presidency because the Democrats were too willing to welcome others with differing views to theirs into their political party, a new study reveals. (2018-09-07)

Enhancing immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy using treatment combination
A combination of a novel inhibitor of the protein CK2 (Casein kinase 2) and an immune checkpoint inhibitor has dramatically greater antitumor activity than either inhibitor alone, according to research from The Wistar Institute that was published online in Cancer Research. (2018-09-05)

When it comes to gonorrhea, gender matters
In a new pilot study, a team led by researchers from Tufts University School of Medicine conducted the first full comparison of gonococcal gene expression and regulation in both men and women, identifying gender-specific signatures in infection and in antibiotic resistance genes. (2018-06-27)

Medicinal cannabis is safe and effective -- it's time to reboot research
Medicinal cannabis is safe and effective in pain relief, and researchers are calling for the treatment to be properly established in our modern medical arsenal. A new special issue of the European Journal of Internal Medicine provides a comprehensive overview of current evidence for the use of cannabis and derived products in medicine, and calls for more research to improve the evidence base for its use. (2018-03-15)

American service industry approaching a 'tipping point'
The average rate at which Americans tip for services has been increasing steadily for decades, but the practice has been branded over the years as classist, anti-egalitarian, and downright undemocratic, leading some restaurateurs to abandon it. A new paper, drawing insight from nonlinear dynamics and published in the journal Chaos, hopes to shed light on the economically irrational world of tipping, showing that at a certain point, banning the practice might be fair and profitable. (2018-02-27)

NYU researchers adapt HIV test in developing rapid diagnostic test for Zika virus
Researchers at New York University College of Dentistry, in collaboration with Rheonix, Inc., are developing a novel test for Zika virus that uses saliva to identify diagnostic markers of the virus in a fraction of the time of current commercial tests. (2018-02-22)

Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking
A new article publishing in the forthcoming volume of the Annual Review of Public Health focuses on harm minimization and smoking cessation, with alternative nicotine products like e-cigarettes emerging as a promising avenue for people who want to quit smoking. (2018-01-11)

Individuals' perceptions on immigration and political trust may have shaped the Brexit vote
A few weeks prior to the EU Referendum in the UK, researchers surveyed 1,000 residents of Kent in the south east of England (where a majority intended to vote to leave), and 1,000 across Scotland (where a majority intended to vote to remain). The findings are published in the British Journal of Social Psychology. (2018-01-10)

Tobacco smokers could gain 86 million years of life if they switch to vaping, study finds
Up to 6.6 million cigarette smokers will live substantially longer if cigarette smoking is replaced by vaping over a ten-year period, calculates a research team led by investigators from Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. In all, cigarette smokers who switch to e-cigarettes could live 86.7 million more years with policies that encourage cigarette smokers to switch completely to e-cigarettes. (2017-10-02)

The surprising, ancient behavior of jellyfish
The discovery that primitive jellyfish sleep suggests that sleep is an ancient, evolutionarily conserved behavior. (2017-09-21)

Arts engagement can help counter divisions in society
Engagement with the arts can help societies counter economic, cultural and political divisions, new research coordinated by psychologists at the University of Kent shows. (2017-08-03)

Study links maternal obesity during pregnancy to behavioral problems in boys
Maternal obesity and child neurodevelopmental problems have both increased in the US and scientists have suggested a possible link. A new study has found that the heavier mothers were when they entered pregnancy, the higher the risk of behavior problems for their sons. However, it did not show the same effects in girls. The results are reported in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. (2017-07-13)

Magnet study sees potential for MRE in measuring liver fibrosis in children
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with collaborators across the nation, have determined that magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) can be an accurate, non-invasive tool to identify liver fibrosis in children. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is now the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children, and scarring of the liver, known as fibrosis, is a major determinant of clinical outcomes. (2017-05-11)

Study examines how behavioral science can help tackle problem of idling engines
New research led by an academic at the University of East Anglia suggests that insights from behavioral science can help inform the design of road signs to bring about changes in driver behavior. (2017-02-09)

ASH launches digital, open-access journal
Launching today, the open-access online journal Blood Advances will fill a niche that complements and expands on topics covered in Blood while also transforming the conversation between authors and readers through innovative communication tools. (2016-11-29)

Study explains evolution phenomenon that puzzled Darwin
Why do some animals have extravagant, showy ornaments -- think deer antlers, peacock feathers and horns on beetles -- that can be a liability to survival? Northwestern University researchers have a possible explanation for this puzzling phenomenon of evolution. Their new mathematical model reveals that in animals with ornamentation, males will evolve out of the tension between natural selection and sexual selection into two distinct subspecies, one with flashy, 'costly' ornaments for attracting mates and one with subdued, 'low-cost' ornaments. (2016-11-29)

Diagnosing and managing food allergies: A guide for physicians
A new review aims to help physicians diagnose and manage food allergies in children and adults. The article, published in CMAJ looks at recent evidence from guidelines, randomized controlled trials and other research. (2016-09-06)

Study suggests new drug candidate could treat both type 2 diabetes and bone loss
A new study has shown that a new class of drug candidates developed at The Scripps Research Institute increases bone mass by expanding bone formation (deposition of new bone) and bone turnover (a normal process of replacement of old bone). (2016-07-27)

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