Current Academia News and Events

Current Academia News and Events, Academia News Articles.
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Six previously FDA-approved drugs appear promising against SARS-CoV-2 in laboratory testing
A team of investigators from the Republic of China has discovered that six drugs previously approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other indications could be repurposed to treat or prevent COVID-19. The research is published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2021-02-09)

Study reveals gender imbalance in scholarly submissions during pandemic
A study conducted by Michelle Bell, Mary E. Pinchot Professor of Environmental Health at the Yale School of the Environment (YSE), and postdoctoral associate Kelvin C. Fong found the rate of manuscript submission to a major peer-reviewed journal (American Journal of Public Health) were higher during the pandemic -- but also revealed a concerning imbalance in submissions by gender. (2021-02-03)

The public health employment picture: Are graduates meeting the demands of the workforce?
In a study to gain understanding of the future public health workforce, researchers conducted a large-scale analysis of first employment outcomes of public health graduates and found that 78 percent were employed; only 5 percent were not employed and job seeking. These indicators may ultimately expand public health's reach and lead to healthier communities. The study is the first national analysis of of public health employment outcomes, and one of only such analyses ever conducted. (2021-01-25)

Scientists discover a new complex europium hydride
A team of researchers from Russia, the United States, and China led by Skoltech Professor Artem R. Oganov has discovered an unexpected very complex europium hydride, Eu8H46. Although devoid of superconductivity, europium hydrides are very interesting in view of chemical anomalies that make europium different from other rare-earth atoms. (2020-12-15)

Image-based navigation could help spacecraft safely land on the moon
In research recently published in the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, a multidisciplinary team of engineers demonstrated how a series of lunar images can be used to infer the direction that a spacecraft is moving. This technique, sometimes called visual odometry, allows navigation information to be gathered even when a good map isn't available. The goal is to allow spacecraft to more accurately target and land at a specific location on the moon without requiring a complete map of its surface. (2020-12-07)

Changes needed to improve UK COVID-19 testing and build strong diagnostic services
More investment and important changes are needed to boost UK testing services, to tackle the COVID-19 pandemic and build a diagnostics service that will head off future UK health challenges, says a meeting report* published by the Academy of Medical Sciences today [Wednesday 11 November 2020]. (2020-11-10)

Clemson researchers decode thermal conductivity with light
Clemson researchers examine a highly efficient thermoelectric material in a new way - by using light. (2020-11-09)

Bridges with limb-inspired architecture can withstand earthquakes, cut repair costs
Structural damage to any of the nation's ailing bridges can come with a hefty price of billions of dollars in repairs. New bridge designs promise more damage-resistant structures and, consequently, lower restoration costs. But if these designs haven't been implemented in the real world, predicting how they can be damaged and what repair strategies should be implemented remain unresolved. (2020-10-26)

World Mental Health Day -- CACTUS releases report of largest researcher mental health survey
On the occasion of 'World Mental Health Day' 2020, CACTUS, a global scientific communications company, has released a global survey on mental health, wellbeing and fulfilment in academia. The survey saw a phenomenal response with 13,000 participants globally, making it one of the largest mental health surveys among academics. (2020-10-14)

How scientific leaders can enact anti-racist action in their labs
A new paper provides 10 steps that principal investigators (PIs) and research group leaders can follow to help cultivate anti-racist professional and learning environments. V. Bala Chaudhary of DePaul University, Chicago, and Asmeret Asefaw Berhe of U.C. Merced present these guidelines in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology. (2020-10-01)

Coral's resilience to warming may depend on iron
How well corals respond to climate change could depend in part on the already scarce amount of iron available in their environment, according to a new study led by Penn State researchers. (2020-09-30)

How everyday speech could transmit viral droplets
High-speed imaging of an individual producing common speech sounds shows that the sudden burst of airflow produced from the articulation of consonants like /p/ or /b/ carry salivary and mucus droplets for at least a meter in front of a speaker. (2020-09-29)

Mass General researchers create bioluminescent tag to detect DNA break repair
A new bioluminescent reporter that tracks DNA double stranded break (DSB) repair in cells has been developed by researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Academia Sinica in Taiwan. (2020-08-21)

How does Earth sustain its magnetic field?
Life as we know it could not exist without Earth's magnetic field and its ability to deflect dangerous ionizing particles. It is continuously generated by the motion of liquid iron in Earth's outer core, a phenomenon called the geodynamo. Despite its fundamental importance, many questions remain unanswered about the geodynamo's origin. New work examines how the presence of lighter elements in the predominately iron core could affect the geodynamo's genesis and sustainability. (2020-07-06)

Chemistry job seekers face tough outlook during pandemic
Even though it's been over a decade, the 2008 recession and its effects still loom over the chemistry enterprise. And now with the COVID-19 pandemic shutting down labs and universities across the world, chemistry students and professionals are again facing hiring freezes, reduced pay and other career obstacles. Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, spoke with chemists about how they're navigating the current economic downturn. (2020-05-13)

Development of effective COVID-19 vaccines will require unprecedented collaboration
A diversity of vaccine approaches, not a single SARS-CoV-2 vaccine or vaccine platform, must be pursued to meet the global need to protect from the continued threat of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, write Lawrence Corey, John R. Mascola, Anthony S. Fauci, and Francis S. Collins in this Policy Forum. (2020-05-11)

Iron deficiency in corals?
When iron is limited, the microalgae that live within coral cells change how they take in other trace metals, which could have cascading effects on vital biological functions and perhaps exacerbate the effects of climate change on corals. (2020-04-23)

The significance of interdisciplinary integration in academic research and application
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this commentary article the authors Phei Er Saw and Shanping Jiang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China consider the significance of interdisciplinary integration in academic research and application. (2020-04-22)

The value of diagnostic testing for SARS-CoV-2: When, whom, what and how often to test?
New research published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, addresses the potential uses of two main types of tests SARS-CoV-2, nucleic acid amplification tests for viral RNA and antibody detection tests. (2020-03-28)

ALMA resolves gas impacted by young jets from supermassive black hole
Astronomers obtained the first resolved image of disturbed gaseous clouds in a galaxy 11 billion light-years away by using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The team found that the disruption is caused by young powerful jets ejected from a supermassive black hole residing at the center of the host galaxy. This result will cast light on the mystery of the evolutionary process of galaxies in the early Universe. (2020-03-27)

Texas Tech researcher contributes to 'roadmap' for greater gender equity in academia
The road to gender equality in academia is long, but one Texas Tech University researcher is now part of a nationwide collaboration hoping to shorten the journey by providing a roadmap. Emily Dhurandhar, an assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology & Sport Management, is one of the authors of ''Turning chutes into ladders for women faculty: A review and roadmap for equity in academia,'' published today in the Journal of Women's Health. (2020-02-11)

Graphene Flagship publishes handbook of graphene manufacturing
The EU-funded research project Graphene Flagship has published a comprehensive guide explaining how to produce and process graphene and related materials (GRMs). The article, Production and Processing of Graphene and Related Materials appears in the latest issue of the IOP Publishing journal, 2D Materials, and is available via open access. (2020-01-29)

An agenda for multidisciplinary cyber risk research
The science of cyber risk is inherently interdisciplinary, argue Gregory Falco and colleagues in this Policy Forum, and no single academic field on its own can adequately address related problems. (2019-11-28)

'Fungal feature tracker' could accelerate mycology research
A new software tool called Fungal Feature Tracker could accelerate understanding of fungal morphology and growth. Guillermo Vidal-Diez de Ulzurrun and colleagues in the laboratory led by Yen-Ping Hsueh at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, present the tool in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-10-31)

Mastering collaboration -- Educating tomorrow's roboticists
Hundreds of students -- from undergraduate to doctoral students -- have contributed to the Army's Robotics Collaborative Technology Alliance by working in university laboratories on real Army problems to supplement and meet educational requirements. (2019-10-22)

First demonstration of a 1 petabit per second network node
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) has demonstrated the first large-scale optical switching testbed capable of handling 1 Petabit per second optical signals. This demonstration made use of state-of-the-art large-scale and low-loss optical switches based on MEMS technology, three types of next-generation spatial-division multiplexing fibers, and included data rates from 10 Terabit per second to 1 Petabit per second. This is a major step forward towards practical petabit-class backbone networks. (2019-10-17)

Are we prepared for a new era of field geology on the moon and beyond?
Space agencies must invest more resources on field geology training of astronauts to take full advantage of scientific opportunities on the moon and other planetary bodies, Kip Hodges and Harrison Schmitt urge, in an Editorial. (2019-09-11)

A step closer to future 5G smartphones with the world's first Antenna-on-Display
A University-Industry research consortium lead by Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) and joined by industry partners such as Dong-Woo Fine Chem, SK Telecom, LG Electronics, Keysight Technologies, and Y.Tech announced the world's first 'Antenna-on-Display (AoD)' technology. (2019-05-06)

'Pedigree is not destiny' when it comes to scholarly success
A new analysis of academic productivity finds researchers' current working environments better predict their future success than the prestige of their doctoral training. (2019-04-29)

The contribution of international academics to UK must be recognised, says business school
Immigrant academics play a critical role in the UK's international and national collaborations that bring social and economic benefits beyond academia, shows a new study of the public engagement activities of the UK's native-born and international academics. (2018-12-11)

'Dropout' rate for academic scientists has risen sharply in past 50 years, study finds
An analysis from Indiana University researchers has found that half the people pursuing scientific careers at institutions of higher education will depart the field after five years -- a sharp contrast compared to 50 years ago. (2018-12-10)

Supermarket produce harbors antibiotic-resistance genes
Researchers from the Julius Kühn Institut, Germany have found that produce is a reservoir for transferable antibiotic resistance genes that often escape traditional molecular detection methods. These antibiotic resistance genes might escape cultivation-independent detection, but could still be transferred to human pathogens or commensals. The results, which highlight the importance of the rare microbiome of produce as a source of antibiotic resistance genes, are published November 6 in the open-access journal, mBio. (2018-11-06)

How ideas go viral in academia
How ideas move through academia may depend on where those ideas come from as much as their quality, a new study suggests. (2018-11-06)

Sea science: Navy task force promotes increased knowledge of ocean environment
At the 2018 Oceans Conference, Chief of Naval Research Rear Adm. David Hahn discussed the goals of the US Navy's Task Force Ocean, a signature program of Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson. TFO is designed to reinvigorate the Navy's commitment to ocean sciences, advancing its tactical advantage through a better knowledge of the ocean environment and its impact on sensors, weapons and operations. (2018-10-29)

Researchers engineer dual vaccine against anthrax and plague
A team of researchers has now engineered a virus nanoparticle vaccine against Bacillus anthracis and Yersinia pestis, tier 1 agents that pose serious threats to national security of the United States. B. anthracis and Y. pestis are the pathogens that cause anthrax and plague, respectively. Using bacteriophage T4, the scientists developed the vaccine by incorporating key antigens of both B. anthracis and Y. pestis into one formulation. Two doses of this vaccine provided complete protection against both inhalational anthrax and pneumonic plague in animal models. (2018-10-16)

Grad students will be future professors, but are they learning how to teach effectively?
A new Portland State University study found that graduate students are on board with wanting to adopt interactive teaching methods but often don't get the training or support they need from their institutions to do so. (2018-09-18)

CasPER -- a new method for diversification of enzymes
Scientists have invented a new method that allows for flexible engineering of essential and nonessential enzymes without additional engineering. (2018-08-21)

Death toll from Hurricane Maria estimated to be larger than previously thought
The number of people who died as a result of Hurricane Maria -- which hit Puerto Rico on Sept. 20, 2017 -- may be as high as 1,139, surpassing the official death count of 64, according to researchers. (2018-08-02)

Restrictions on research grant applications cause chaos
Mathematicians at the University of Kent, with input from the University of Sheffield, have established that current restrictions on academics applying for research grants are causing major problems, harming smaller institutions and minorities in the process. To reduce the time and money spent evaluating applications, many funding bodies responded by restricting the number they receive. (2018-07-16)

No relation between a supermassive black hole and its host galaxy!?
Using ALMA to observe an active galaxy with a strong ionized gas outflow from the galactic center, a team led by Dr. Toba of ASIAA (Taiwan) has obtained a result making astronomers even more puzzled -- the team clearly detected CO gas associated with the galactic disk, yet they have also found that the CO gas which settles in the galaxy is not affected by the strong ionized gas outflow launched from the galactic center. (2018-02-20)

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