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Current Academic Performance News and Events, Academic Performance News Articles.
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KIER developed separator that reduced gas crossover for water electrolyzer
Dr. Won-chul Cho of Hydrogen Research Department of the Korea Institute of Energy Research has developed a separator membrane that significantly reduces gas crossover while exhibiting high performance comparable to the commercial separator for alkaline water electrolyzer. (2020-02-26)
Metal-organic frameworks can separate gases despite the presence of water
Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are promising materials for inexpensive and less energy-intensive gas separation even in the presence of impurities such as water. (2020-02-26)
Study finds gender disparities in hematology research success
Hematologists who complete a mentored training program experience greater levels of academic success than those who do not; however, a study published today in Blood Advances suggests a slight discrepancy in success levels between male and female hematologists. (2020-02-25)
UK special school pupils 'treated differently', following removal of standardized assessments
Following the recent withdrawal of standardized assessments, children with intellectual disabilities at special schools in the UK are again being treated differently to children at mainstream schools, says a new study from researchers at The Open University. (2020-02-23)
Tart cherry juice concentrate found to help improve endurance exercise performance
Montmorency tart cherry juice has gained a reputation as a recovery drink among elite and recreational exercisers, with research suggesting benefits for reducing strength loss and improving muscle recovery after intensive exercise. (2020-02-19)
Big ideas in performance management 2.0
Industrial-era performance management paradigms and practices are outdated and ineffective in the modern VUCA work environment. (2020-02-19)
Certification as a medical home: Does it make a difference in diabetes care?
Practices certified as medical homes have more systems and improved performance for diabetes care, but the differences are modest. (2020-02-18)
Improving the electrical and mechanical properties of carbon-nanotube-based fibers
University of Illinois researchers at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology recently developed a technique that can be used to build carbon-nanotube-based fibers by creating chemical crosslinks. (2020-02-18)
Feedback culture: When colleagues become competitors
Competitive behavior among employees may be triggered by the type of feedback they have received. (2020-02-15)
A good blood supply is good for memory
Memory performance and other cognitive abilities benefit from a good blood supply to the brain. (2020-02-14)
Protecting pipelines during land movements
Researchers at the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have developed a cost-effective and practical method to protect pipelines and keep them operating during significant fault rupture incidents and large ground movements. (2020-02-13)
Electric solid propellant -- can it take the heat?
Electric solid propellants are being explored as a safer option for pyrotechnics, mining, and in-space propulsion because they only ignite with an electric current. (2020-02-13)
Something from nothing: Using waste heat to power electronics
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba developed an improved thermocell design to convert heat into electricity. (2020-02-12)
How the brain's immune system could be harnessed to improve memory
Inflammation can send the brain's immune cells into damaging hyperdrive, an effect that has been linked to neurodegenerative diseases that affect memory, like dementia. (2020-02-11)
Software updates slowing you down?
We've all shared the frustration -- software updates that are intended to make our applications run faster inadvertently end up doing just the opposite. (2020-02-11)
Review of evidence finds excessive smartphone, social media use may be linked to youth mental health
A new article in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) reviews evidence that suggests an association between excessive smartphone and social media use and mental distress and suicidality among adolescents. (2020-02-10)
New method offers more stable, efficient electrocatalytic reactions
By fluidizing catalyst particles in electrolyte instead of gluing them to electrodes, researchers made electrocatalytic reactions that are more efficient and longer lasting, which play an important role in energy storage. (2020-02-10)
New score measuring multiple chronic illnesses performs better than current method
A new score that measures multiple long-term health conditions performs better than the current Charlson Comorbidity Index and may help in health care planning and delivery, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-02-03)
Government grants deliver highest returns for college financing, says study
Merit-based grants are a government's best bet for providing effective student aid for long-term economic growth - increasing both welfare (measured in terms of long-term well-being outcomes) and efficiency, according to a new joint study from the University of British Columbia, Queen's, Princeton and Yale. (2020-02-03)
Can exercise improve video game performance?
Time spent playing video games is often seen as time stolen from physical activities. (2020-01-30)
National survey: Students' feelings about high school are mostly negative
In a nationwide survey of 21,678 US high school students, researchers from the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and the Yale Child Study Center found that nearly 75% of the students' self-reported feelings related to school were negative. (2020-01-30)
Synthesis considers how being smart helps you at school and school helps you become smarter
Academic achievement plays an important role in children's development because academic skills, especially in reading and math, affect many outcomes, including educational attainment, performance and income at work, health, and longevity. (2020-01-28)
High school GPAs are stronger predictors of college graduation than ACT scores
Students' high school grade point averages are five times stronger than their ACT scores at predicting college graduation, according to a new study published today in Educational Researcher, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2020-01-28)
Research shows the sexes have equal spatial cognition skills
Men are not better than women at spatial cognition -- such as map reading -- is the principal finding from ground-breaking work by researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software, hosted at University of Limerick (UL), Ireland. (2020-01-27)
How employees' rankings disrupt cooperation and how managers can restore it
First prize is a Cadillac Eldorado, second prize a set of steak knives, third prize you're fired». (2020-01-27)
Study points to 'unintended consequences' of heavy data surveillance in rugby
New research suggests that intense monitoring and surveillance in rugby can lead players to think more about their own results than those of the team. (2020-01-27)
Performance and age only partially explain gender pay gap for New Zealand researchers
Over her lifetime, the average female scientific researcher at a New Zealand university earns about NZ$400,000 less than her male counterparts, and less than half of this disparity can be explained by research performance and age. (2020-01-22)
Esports organisations look to optimise player sleep
A study has used sleep tracking devices and mood measures (anxiety and depression) to determine how well esports athletes around the world sleep, and the effect this has on their mental health and well being. (2020-01-21)
Strongly 'handed' squirrels less good at learning
Squirrels that strongly favour their left or right side are less good at learning, new research suggests. (2020-01-19)
Internet use reduces study skills in university students
Research conducted at Swansea University and the University of Milan has shown that students who use digital technology excessively are less motivated to engage with their studies, and are more anxious about tests. (2020-01-17)
Advisers not enough to guarantee a strong retirement
Rui Yao, a nationally recognized expert on retirement savings from the University of Missouri, suggests that employees can't trust that the retirement plan sponsored by their employer is in good hands just because the plan uses an adviser. (2020-01-15)
Impaired driving -- even once the high wears off
McLean researchers have discovered that recreational marijuana use affects driving ability even when users are not intoxicated. (2020-01-14)
Study questions routine troponin testing for ACS in geriatric patients with NSCs
The results of a study conducted by researchers from Indiana University School of Medicine may not support troponin testing for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in selected elderly patients with nonspecific complaints (NCSs). (2020-01-13)
Prolonged ECG monitoring of ED patients with syncope is safe alternative to hospitalization
Prolonged cardiac rhythm monitoring will improve arrhythmia diagnostic yield among non-low-risk emergency department patients with syncope. (2020-01-13)
Math test score gap between white and non-white students in Brazil due to complex factors
School test scores often show gaps in performance between white and non-white students. (2020-01-02)
'I will do my very best!' Children who engage in positive self-talk about effort can boost their math achievement
Children who think poorly of themselves often underachieve in school. (2019-12-17)
NREL, Co-Optima research yields potential bioblendstock for diesel fuel
The NREL scientists, along with colleagues at Yale University, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are part of the Department of Energy's Co-Optimization of Fuels & Engines (Co-Optima) initiative. (2019-12-17)
A flaky option boosts organic solar cells
Tungsten disulfide helps to channel charge in flexible photovoltaics. (2019-12-16)
Smaller class sizes not always better for pupils, multinational study shows
A new statistical analysis of data from a long-term study on the teaching of mathematics and science has found that smaller class sizes are not always associated with better pupil performance and achievement. (2019-12-15)
Freestanding microwire-array enables flexible solar window
Transparent solar cells (TSC) are emerging device that combines the benefits of visible transparency and electricity generation. (2019-12-13)
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