Current Academics News and Events

Current Academics News and Events, Academics News Articles.
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Supercomputer in your bedroom
University of Sussex academics have established a method of turbocharging desktop PCs to give them the same capability as supercomputers worth tens of millions of pounds. (2021-02-02)

Doctors should change the way that they ask patients about self-harm and suicide
Doctors can better help patients with mental health concerns by adopting a different questioning style around self-harm and suicide, experts have said. (2020-12-21)

Talking to kids about weight: What the internet says and why researchers are wary
Researchers from the Center for Weight, Eating and Lifestyle Science (WELL Center) in the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University systematically reviewed numerous independently published guidelines for having conversations with children about weight status to analyze their content, consistency, actionability and scientific support. They recommend future guidelines unify their messages and be better supported by scholarly data. (2020-12-17)

COVID-19 amplifies inequalities in healthcare access for ethnic minority and migrant women
In their recent research paper, published in the Feminist Legal Studies journal, City, University of London's Dr Sabrina Germain and Dr Adrienne Yong say existing barriers to medical care for these marginalised women have been intensified by the pandemic, and must be examined so as to understand their poorer health outcomes. (2020-11-27)

Scientists and students publish blueprints for a cheaper single-molecule microscope
A team of scientists and students from the University of Sheffield has designed and built a specialist microscope, and shared the build instructions to help make this equipment available to many labs across the world. (2020-11-06)

The hidden threat of the home office
Working at home has given many people the opportunity to arrange their working hours more freely than usual. But has it really given us more freedom? (2020-10-23)

The development of climate security discourse in Japan
This research traced discourses related to climate security in Japan to determine why so little exists in Japan and whether or not such discourse could suggest new areas for consideration to more comprehensively respond to the climate change problem. Based on categorization of various approaches by climate security-related literature outside Japan, the study revealed areas where Japan has been able to respond to, and other areas where almost no discussion is being made in Japan. (2020-10-01)

Thousands of excess deaths from cardiovascular disease during the COVID-19 pandemic
Thousands of excess deaths from cardiovascular disease during the COVID-19 pandemic A major new study has identified 2085 excess deaths in England and Wales due to heart disease and stroke during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. On average, that is 17 deaths each day over four months that probably could have been prevented. (2020-09-28)

Jobs for the boys: How children give voice to gender stereotyped job roles
Children, and especially boys, show stronger stereotyping about masculine and feminine jobs than previously suspected, an innovative study by the University of Sussex reveals. (2020-07-27)

Cranfield academics call for 'Five Capitals' approach to global resilience
Writing in the leading academic journal, Nature, Cranfield academics are calling for global resilience to be shaped around the 'Five Capitals' - natural, human, social, built and financial. The academics believe that too often silos exist within Government and within organisations and businesses that mean risks are not anticipated quickly enough or prepared for well enough. (2020-07-06)

Children of academics exhibit more stress
If the parents have a degree, their children also believe that they have to get one. This can put them under pressure. (2020-06-25)

It's not about money -- why academic scientists engage in commercial activities
For scientists, engaging in commercial activities such as patenting and starting new ventures can be much more lucrative than relying on pure academic work. However, according to new research by ESMT Berlin, money is not the main reason why scientists choose to work on commercial activities. Motives such as social impact seem more important. (2020-06-18)

We need a new approach to UK resilience -- leading Cranfield academics
Leading academics from across Cranfield University are calling for a new approach to UK resilience. Writing in today's Financial Times, the academics believe that as well as lessons learnt from the response to COVID-19 there is a much wider lesson to be learnt about how the UK identifies, prepares and responds to threats and risks, such as to our safety, our national security and from climate change. (2020-05-25)

A pioneering study into the description of the architecture of a new standard for telecommunications
The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is a United Nations Organization agency commissioned to regulate international telecommunications between different operating administrations and businesses. Pursuant to specific recommendations by this organization, on 1 July, standard Y.3172, an architecture for machine learning in future networks (5G and beyond), was approved for telecommunications networks. (2020-05-08)

Key failings in government's approach to COVID-19 preparations and emergency response
The UK government made key failings in their strategic preparations and emergency response to coronavirus and this, in turn, undermined the NHS's ability to cope with the crisis. These are the findings recently published in a research paper for the Journal of Risk Research by academics from Cass Business School, Glasgow Caledonian University, Vlerick Business School, and Nottingham University Business School. (2020-05-07)

Research examines the impact of new technology used in video court hearings
A new academic evaluation of video-enabled justice published today (Monday 4 May) offers insights for courts, court users and others at a time when the Covid-19 pandemic looks set to necessitate a rapid increase in the use of technology to ensure the timely administration of justice. (2020-05-04)

Chilean scientists warn environmental costs of water roads
The interdisciplinary analysis presented this in Nature Sustaintability by researchers from four Chilean universities, recommends a global analysis in the design of these projects, reconciling the growing demand for water supply with the health of freshwater and marine ecosystems. (2020-05-02)

Study shows glaucoma could be successfully treated with gene therapy
A new study led by the University of Bristol has shown a common eye condition, glaucoma, could be successfully treated with a single injection using gene therapy, which would improve treatment options, effectiveness and quality of life for many patients. (2020-04-21)

New index challenges university rankings
Academic freedom is fundamental to scientific progress, pursuit of truth, quality higher education and international collaboration. Universities and states have signed statements of their commitment to safeguard academic freedom, yet in practice, they do not always implement them. How severe are infringements of academic freedom? Are these infringements getting better or worse? Prof. Dr. Katrin Kinzelbach of the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), has investigated these questions in collaboration with international partners and has published a global academic freedom index. (2020-03-26)

Assessing the the global problem of poor sanitation
Experts are investigating a better way of measuring the number of people exposed to the health risks of poorly-managed sanitation systems - and it will help reveal whether the world is on track to deliver UN Sustainable Goal 6 (SDG6). (2020-03-25)

Double success for University drug resistance research
Swansea University research into the threat posed by antifungal drug resistance has been highlighted in two prestigious international journals. (2020-02-14)

Analyzing the differences in antibiotic resistance between the gut and mouth microbiome
The threat of antimicrobial resistance to medication is a global health issue. Recent years have seen a surge in our awareness of resistance genes; and as a result of the prevalence of these genes, antibiotics are becoming less effective at treating microbial infections, such as TB and gonorrhea. (2020-02-04)

Small change for climate change: Time to increase research funding to save the world
A new study shows that there is a huge disproportion in the level of funding for social science research into the greatest challenge in combating global warming -- how to get individuals and societies to overcome ingrained human habits to make the changes necessary to mitigate climate change. (2020-01-16)

From the mouths of babes: Lessons in humility
A poem written by Alexandra M. Sims, M.D., FAAP, will be published Jan. 7, 2020, in JAMA, as part of its series of works by artists and physicians that explore the meaning of healing and illness. (2020-01-07)

Impact of methamphetamine use depends on your genes
The research, published in Molecular Psychiatry found that variations in the gene known as BDNF strongly determine the effects of methamphetamine in the brain. This could potentially explain why some users develop methamphetamine-induced psychosis, which is similar to schizophrenia. (2019-12-19)

Research finds positive community action can help coral reef health
A team of social scientists and ecologists have worked with two communities in Papua New Guinea to document and investigate their enduring success in managing their reefs sustainably. (2019-12-19)

Study busts 9 to 5 model for academic work
An observational study of academic working hours has identified large differences in how researchers around the world manage their work-life balance. (2019-12-19)

Boosting the impact of consumer research in the world
The authors urge consumer researchers to break their self-imposed boundaries in order to broaden their impact, lest they become irrelevant to non-academic marketing stakeholders and cede influence to non-marketing academic disciplines. (2019-12-11)

Harvesting energy from walking human body Lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester develop
A research team led by Professor Wei-Hsin Liao from the Department of Mechanical and Automation Engineering, The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has developed a lightweight smart materials-based energy harvester for scavenging energy from human motion, generating inexhaustible and sustainable power supply just from walking. (2019-11-20)

Higher earning 'elite' political lobbyists overstate their own achievements, study shows
'Elite', high-earning political lobbyists are more likely to overstate their achievements, a new study shows. (2019-11-06)

New Mersey designs show tidal barriers bring more benefits than producing clean energy
When designed holistically, tidal barrage schemes can provide additional transport links for commuters, become tourism destinations, mitigate wildlife habitat loss, as well as provide opportunities to boost people's health and wellbeing with additional options for cycling and walking, say researchers from Lancaster University and the University of Liverpool. (2019-09-24)

Who dominates the discourse of the past?
Male academics, who comprise less than 10% of North American archaeologists, write the vast majority of the field's high impact, peer-reviewed literature. (2019-07-29)

Cigarette butts hamper plant growth -- study
Researchers have shown for the first time that cigarette butts reduce plant growth. Cigarette butts are the most common form of litter worldwide, with an estimated 4.5 trillion discarded annually. (2019-07-19)

Managed apiaries may lead to higher rates of viral infection in wild bumblebees
Viral pathogens that might play a role in the decline in wild bumblebees may be transmitted from managed honeybees through flowers, according to a study published June 26 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Samantha Alger of the University of Vermont, and colleagues. (2019-06-26)

Motherhood can deliver body image boost -- new study
New research indicates that perfectionism is related to breast size dissatisfaction, but only in non-mothers -- suggesting that mothers are more comfortable with their bodies. (2019-06-19)

New study shows gender pay gap is still issue for airline staff
The gender pay gap within airlines is often attributed to the fact that men frequently carry out high technically skilled jobs such as pilots and mechanics, whereas women commonly work in customer service roles like cabin crew. But a new paper by Swansea University researchers has revealed that the gap exists for cabin crew after controlling for contract type. (2019-06-17)

'Power shift' needed to improve gender balance in energy research, report says
Women still face significant barriers in forging successful and influential careers in UK energy research, a new high-level report has revealed. (2019-06-14)

Academics show how to create a spotlight of sound with LEGO-like bricks
Informatics experts create low-cost directional beams of sound. Using age-old principles of magnifying glasses, lighthouses and telescopes to create state-of-the-art sound. Bringing the vision of Minority Report into reality and transforming possibilities of entertainment industry (2019-05-07)

Train your brain to eat less sugar
A recent study led by Evan Forman, PhD, a psychology professor in Drexel University's College of Arts and Sciences, shows that a computer game can be used to train its players to eat less sugar, as way of reducing their weight and improving their health. (2019-05-07)

Research develops top tips to foster better relationships between scientists and business
University researchers and industry practitioners have developed lists of 'top tips' for businesses and academics to foster better relationships that could potentially benefit all parties. (2019-03-21)

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