Current Accessibility News and Events

Current Accessibility News and Events, Accessibility News Articles.
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Inhibition of the BAF complex causes rapid loss of DNA accessibility
When human cells have to adapt, the BAF complex plays a central role because it controls the accessibility of the DNA and thus the information stored in it. In every fifth human cancer, a mutation is found in one of the BAF complex genes. Scientists at CeMM have investigated this complex in more detail and were able to show how quickly changes in the BAF complex genes influence the accessibility of DNA. (2021-02-09)

Machine learning generates realistic genomes for imaginary humans
Machines, thanks to novel algorithms and advances in computer technology, can now learn complex models and even generate high-quality synthetic data such as photo-realistic images or even resumes of imaginary humans. A study recently published in the international journal PLOS Genetics uses machine learning to mine existing biobanks and generate chunks of human genomes which do not belong to real humans but have the characteristics of real genomes. (2021-02-05)

Sport participation levels lower in students from lower socio-economic groups
Students from lower socio-economic groups (SEG) are less likely to participate in sport or physical activity at university, research from Sheffield Hallam University has found. (2021-02-01)

Not everyone has equal access to crucial information that can stop the spread of COVID-19
A newly-published global survey of national health authority websites in nearly 200 countries has directly quantified COVID-19 information accessibility. Only a few of the countries examined fully adhered to internationally recognized accessibility guidelines. Websites from the majority of countries surveyed continue to contain accessibility errors that present significant barriers to people with disabilities. As a result, not everyone has equal access to government health websites and, therefore, vital information to stop the spread of COVID-19. (2021-01-26)

Embedded counseling services can improve accessibility for students, MU study finds
Kerry Karaffa is the first MU Counseling Center psychologist to be embedded specifically within the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine, where he provides tailored counseling services for professional students training to become veterinarians. (2021-01-21)

Students returning home may have caused 9,400 secondary COVID-19 infections across UK
A student infected with COVID-19 returning home from university for Christmas would, on average, have infected just less than one other household member with the virus, according to a new model devised by mathematicians at Cardiff University and published in Health Systems. (2021-01-17)

Canada must dismantle anti-Black racism in medicine
Canada must dismantle anti-Black racism in health care to address its harmful effects on people's health, argue authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.201579 (2021-01-11)

Change in use, perceptions of nicotine vaping among US youth 2017-2020
This study estimates how common nicotine vaping is, its perceived harm and the accessibility of nicotine vaping products among U.S. adolescents from 2017 to 2020. (2020-12-15)

Quantitative approach on understanding how epigenetic switches control gene expression
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology decipher how to quantitatively assess the effects of specific epigenetic changes on the rate of transcription by developing a mathematical model. For this, they successfully generated reconstituted chromatin bearing histone modifications in vitro. Their study published in Nucleic Acids Research provides an accurate quantitative approach for understanding how site-specific changes to histone proteins impact the accessibility of chromatin and gene expression levels. (2020-12-10)

Towards accessible healthcare for all in sub-Saharan Africa
A state-of-the-art georeferenced database of public healthcare facilities. In the prestigious journal PNAS, a new study published with the contribution of the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment (EIEE) provides a comprehensive planning-oriented, inequality-focused analysis of different types of healthcare accessibility in sub-Saharan Africa. (2020-11-30)

New graph-based statistical method detects threats to vehicular communications networks
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have worked to create methods for improving the safety of technologically complex vehicles. Riadul Islam, assistant professor of computer science and electrical engineering, has worked with collaborators at UMBC and the University of Michigan-Dearborn to create a simple, easily adapted method for detecting the breaches in security. (2020-11-24)

New molecular atlases reveal how human cells grow and develop
Two cell atlases have been created that track gene expression and chromatin accessibility during the development of human cell types and tissues. The atlases provide a fundamental resource for understanding gene expression and chromatin accessibility in human development that is unprecedented in scale. One maps gene expression within individual cells across 15 fetal tissues. The other maps chromatin accessibility of individual genes within cells. (2020-11-12)

Expensive gene therapies raise challenges and opportunities: Expert panel report
Gene therapies are being approved for use in Canada, but could strain healthcare budgets and exacerbate existing treatment inequities across the country. However, there are opportunities to control spending, streamline approvals and support fair access through innovation, coordination and collaboration, according to a new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA). (2020-11-03)

Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form
Encoding memories in engram cells is controlled by large-scale remodeling of the proteins and DNA that make up cells' chromatin, according to an MIT study. This chromatin remodeling, which allows specific genes involved in storing memories to become more active, takes place in multiple stages spread out over several days. (2020-10-05)

Latent lineage potential in neural stem cells enables spinal cord repair in mice
Spinal stem cells in mice can be reprogrammed to generate protective oligodendrocytes after spinal cord injury, enhancing neural repair, according to a new study. (2020-10-01)

Study highlights dual burden of menstruation and homelessness
Homeless New Yorkers who menstruate face numerous challenges due to inadequate access to toilets, bathing spaces, and laundering services, as well as pervasive menstrual stigma. The study highlights the need for improved quality, supply, and accessibility of bathrooms for sheltered and street-dwelling homeless, and ease of access to bathing and laundering, particularly as the number of women in the city's shelter system is near record highs. (2020-09-30)

Dams exacerbate the consequences of climate change on river fish
A potential response of river fish to environmental changes is to colonize new habitats. But what happens when dams and weirs restrict their movement? And are native and alien species similarly affected? Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and the Spanish University of Girona (UdG) have addressed these questions in a recent study. (2020-09-14)

Heroin-addicted individuals have unique brain disturbances resembling those of Alzheimer's
Herion-addicted individuals have alterations in the expression a gene called FYN - a gene known to regulate the production of Tau, a protein that is highly elevated and implicated in neurocognitive disorders like Alzheimer's disease. The study emphasizes that opioid use can affect the brain in a way that might increase vulnerability of neural systems that trigger neurodegeneration later in life; however, since these changes are epigenetic (alterations in gene function that are influenced by environmental factors and not alterations of the DNA itself), they are reversible and medications that have already been developed to target FYN for neurodegenerative disorders may be studied as a novel treatment for opioid addiction. (2020-09-14)

The potential of green infrastructure in mitigating flood impacts: Focused on the mobility of low income and minority comunities
This research advances national methods for assessing flood vulnerability and prioritizing transportation improvement investments, to ensure that no community is left stranded when the next flood occurs. (2020-09-03)

A Politecnico di Milano study reveals DNA "grammar"
DNA three-dimensional structure is determined by a series of spatial rules based on particular protein sequences and their order. This was the finding of a study recently published in Genome Biology by Luca Nanni, PhD student in Computer Science and Engineering at Politecnico di Milano, together with Professors Stefano Ceri of the same University and Colin Logie of the University of Nijmegen. (2020-08-27)

Digital contact tracing alone may not be miracle answer for COVID-19
In infectious disease outbreaks, digital contact tracing alone could reduce the number of cases, but not as much as manual contract tracing, new University of Otago-led research published in the Cochrane Library reveals. (2020-08-18)

Oil-soluble transition metal-based catalysts tested for in-situ oil upgrading
The results of the study showed that the good catalytic properties of the new transition metal catalysts, as well as their low cost and easy accessibility, make them a potential solution in the aquathermolysis reaction and heavy oil recovery. (2020-08-11)

Research suggests greater access to specific HIV and tuberculosis medications is needed
A specific combination of HIV and TB treatments, difficult to obtain in certain parts of the world, decreased mortality risk for patients with HIV and multidrug-resistant TB. (2020-08-07)

Allelic imbalance of chromatin openness is linked to neuropsychiatric disorders
New study finds single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affect chromatin accessibility, which in turn affects whether or not a gene can be expressed (2020-08-03)

High-end microscopy refined
New details are known about an important cell structure: For the first time, two Würzburg research groups have been able to map the synaptonemal complex three-dimensionally with a resolution of 20 to 30 nanometres. (2020-07-01)

Research brings tech tutorials to people with visual impairments
Project allows users to interact with models of circuit boards that provide audio feedback in response to being touched. (2020-06-23)

Forgot where you parked the car? Research suggests memory is a game of all or nothing
An online study, involving more than 400 participants aged 18-35, reveals that memories for specific locations are either totally forgotten or, if they are remembered, it's with as much precision as when they were first learnt. (2020-06-08)

How drones can monitor explosive volcanoes
Due to high risk for researchers, the imaging of active volcanoes has so far been a great challenge in volcanology. Scientists from the German Research Center for Geosciences GFZ used a drone for a series of repeated survey flights with optical and thermal imaging cameras at the Santa Maria volcano in Guatemala. A regular and systematic survey of dangerous volcanoes with drones seems to be close. (2020-05-25)

At the crossroads
In the bone marrow, blood stem cells via precursor cells give rise to a variety of blood cell types with various functions: white blood cells, red blood cells, or blood platelets. In which cell type a cell develops depends on various factors. The correct dosage of the enzyme MOF at the right time triggers developmental programs in blood stem cells and precursor cells, and the cells differentiate into red blood cells. (2020-05-20)

Detecting dyslexia with interactions that do not require a knowledge of language
Dyslexia is a specific learning disorder that affects 5 - 15% of the world population. MusVis, a web game developed by Maria Rauschenberger supervised by Ricardo Baeza-Yates and Luz Rello, researchers associated with the Department of Information and Communication Technologies (DTIC) at UPF, received the W4A Attendees' Award on 20 April at the 17th International Web for All Conference. (2020-05-13)

Clinical implications of chromatin accessibility in human cancers
Volume 11, Issue 18 of @Oncotarget Clinical implications of chromatin accessibility assessed by ATAC-seq profiling in human cancers especially in a large patient cohort is largely unknown. (2020-05-05)

Digital solutions for dementia care
Telehealth delivery of dementia care in the home can be as effective as face-to-face home visit services if carers and recipients take advantage of the technologies available, Australian researchers say. The study of 63 people living with mild to moderate dementia, and their care partners, found that telehealth services using videoconferences can save travel time - particularly in rural and remote areas - and equip families with strategies to promote independence in the person with dementia. (2020-04-23)

Speedy antibiotic susceptibility tests for high-priority pathogens
At the core of the antibiotic-resistance crisis is the lack of a rapid and general antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) that can assess the infecting pathogen's sensitivity to antibiotics and inform treatment decisions directly at the point of care. In two new PLOS Biology papers, researchers from the lab of Rustem Ismagilov at the California Institute of Technology have developed two distinct, innovative AST methods for measuring a pathogen's susceptibility to beta-lactams on extremely short time scales. (2020-03-19)

How the urban environment affects the diet of its citizens
In the high-impact journal Appetite the UPV/EHU's Nursing and Health Promotion research group has published a study using photovoice methodology and which qualitatively compares citizens' perceptions about the food environment in three Bilbao neighbourhoods with different socioeconomic levels. The participants in the project, residents in the said neighbourhoods, analysed and explained how the neighbourhoods can affect their diet. (2020-02-24)

Pill-sized 'heater' could increase accessibility in diagnosing infectious disease
Researchers at the University of Toronto Engineering have developed a tiny 'heater' -- about the size of a pill -- that could allow resource-limited regions around the world to test for infectious diseases without the need for specialized training or costly lab equipment. (2020-02-20)

Certain factors linked with discontinuing breast cancer therapy
For women with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, long-term endocrine therapy can greatly reduce the risk of recurrence. Many women, especially those in underserved populations, do not continue treatment, however. A new Psycho-Oncology study uncovers some of the factors that may be involved. (2020-02-19)

Organoids open window into development of human forebrain
Brain region-specific organoids have allowed researchers to peer inside the complex programming of human forebrain development, a process once inaccessible to molecular study. (2020-01-23)

Women still face barriers to breastfeed at work
Despite the protections in place to support breastfeeding for employees, the burden still falls on working mothers to advocate for the resources they need, according to a new study from the University of Georgia. (2020-01-21)

Maximizing bike-share ridership: New research says it's all about location
The popularity of bike-share systems has grown in popularity thanks to the younger, more environmentally conscious generation. While they have garnered considerable attention in cities from Paris to Washington, D.C., their promise of urban transformation is far from being fully realized. (2020-01-06)

New index maps relationships between poverty and accessibility in Brazil
Poor transportation availability can result in poor access to health care and employment, hence reinforcing the cycle of poverty and concerning health outcomes such as low life expectancy and high child mortality in rural Brazil. (2019-12-02)

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