Current Accident News and Events

Current Accident News and Events, Accident News Articles.
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New highly radioactive particles found in Fukushima
The 10 year anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident occurs in March. Work just published in the Journal 'Science of the Total Environment' documents new, large (> 300 micrometers), highly radioactive particles that were released from one of the damaged Fukushima reactors. (2021-02-17)

Plant as superhero during nuclear power plant accidents
A collaborative study by a group of scientists from Iwate University, The University of Tokyo and Shimane University, Japan demonstrated for the first time that two ATP binding cassette proteins ABCG33 and ABCG37 function as potassium-independent cesium uptake carriers. (2021-02-16)

Dynamics of radiocesium in forests after the Fukushima disaster: Concerns and some hope
The 2011 nuclear disaster at Fukushima, Japan caused a great amount of radioactive cesium to spread to nearby forests. Now, in a chapter in the latest technical document of the International Atomic Energy Agency, researchers from Japan, in collaboration with experts in Europe, explore the dynamic flow of these radionuclides in forest ecosystems. Their compilation of data and analyses on radiocesium dynamics will help us develop better forest remediation strategies. (2021-02-03)

New method heals skeletal injuries with synthetic bone
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, in collaboration with colleagues in Dresden, Germany, have developed a way of combining a bone substitute and drugs to regenerate bone and heal severe fractures in the thigh or shin bone. The study, published in the research journal Science Advances, was conducted on rats, but the researchers think that the method in various combinations will soon be commonplace in clinical settings. (2021-01-19)

Laypeople have difficulty estimating severity of blood loss
When an accident occurs, the reactions of bystanders are important. Researchers have studied whether laypeople realise the severity of the situation when someone in their proximity begins to bleed, and whether they can estimate how much the person is bleeding. The results show a discrepancy related to the victim's gender: for a woman losing blood, both blood loss and life-threatening injuries were underestimated. The study has been published in the scientific journal PLoS One. (2021-01-11)

Crops near Chernobyl still contaminated
Crops grown near Chernobyl are still contaminated due to the 1986 nuclear accident, new research shows. (2020-12-17)

Popular European football games linked to traffic accidents in Asia
Days when high profile European football matches are played are associated with more traffic accidents in Asia than days when less popular matches are played, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

How automated vehicles can impede driver performance, and what to do about it
A University of Toronto Engineering study is underscoring the importance of drivers keeping their eyes on the road -- even when they are in an automated vehicle (AV). The findings, published recently in the journal Accident Analysis & Prevention, revealed that drivers can become over-reliant on AV technology. This was especially true with a type of in-vehicle display the team coined as takeover request and automation capability (TORAC). (2020-12-01)

Focal epilepsy often overlooked
Having subtler symptoms, a form of epilepsy that affects only one part of the brain often goes undiagnosed long enough to cause unexpected seizures that contribute to car crashes, a new study finds. (2020-10-20)

Story tips: Cool smart walls, magnetism twist, fuel cost savings and polymers' impact
ORNL Story Tips: Cool smart walls, magnetism twist, fuel cost savings and polymers' impact, September 2020 (2020-09-01)

Robot technology for everyone or only for the average person?
Robot technology is being used more and more in health rehabilitation and in working life. Exoskeletons are one technology with great potential. But this technology is often developed for the average person. So what about people who are small and thin, or tall and overweight? (2020-08-12)

Video camera in a public place knows the density of people or vehicle more accurately
Deep learning applied for image/video processing opened the door for the practical deployment for object detection and identification with acceptable accuracy. Crowd counting is another application of image/video processing. The scientists at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) designed a new DNN with backward connection, which achieved more accurate estimation of the density of objects. It can be applied for estimating human density in the public or vehicle density on a road. (2020-07-27)

Software of autonomous driving systems
Researchers at TU Graz and AVL focus on software systems of autonomous driving systems. They developed a method for generating safety-critical simulation scenarios and an adaptive control procedure for compensating for internal errors. (2020-07-23)

New map for radioactive soil contamination in Western Europe
An international consortium of scientists has refined the map of caesium and plutonium radionuclide concentrations in soils in Switzerland and several neighbouring countries. Using an archive of European soil samples, the team led by Katrin Meusburger from the University of Basel, now at the WSL research institute, was able to trace the sources of radioactive fallout between 1960 and 2009. This study was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-07-16)

Slow down: Reduced speed limits save lives in busy cities
Traffic accidents are the leading cause of non-natural deaths worldwide. Lower speed limits may help prevent accidents. But speed-reduction policies can be controversial and effects are not well documented. A new study from University of Illinois shows that speed reductions in São Paulo, Brazil, dramatically reduced fatal accidents and increased travel times only minimally. (2020-06-11)

Two lefties make a right -- if you are a one-in-a-million garden snail
A global campaign to help find a mate for a left-coiling snail called 'Jeremy' has enabled scientists to understand how mirror-image garden snails are formed. The findings, published today in the journal Biology Letters, show that the rare left-spiralling shell of some garden snails is usually a development accident, rather than an inherited condition. (2020-06-02)

How associative fear memory is formed in the brain
Using a mouse model, a pair of UC Riverside researchers demonstrated the formation of fear memory involves the strengthening of neural pathways between two brain areas: the hippocampus, which responds to a particular context and encodes it, and the amygdala, which triggers defensive behavior, including fear responses. (2020-03-13)

Engineers crack 58-year-old puzzle on way to quantum breakthrough
A mishap during an experiment led UNSW quantum computing researchers to crack a mystery that had stood since 1961. (2020-03-11)

Radionuclide levels in freshwater fish differ between lakes and rivers
After the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, managing environmental radionuclide contamination efficiently has become incredibly important. In light of this, a team of scientists from Miharu, Japan, have provided insights that could potentially lead to more accurate environmental risk management in the future. They have shown that the factors affecting contamination of freshwater fish differ between lakes and rivers. (2020-03-02)

Study analyzes impact of switch from nuclear power to coal, suggests directions for policy
A new study used data from the United States to analyze the costs and benefits of electricity production from coal-fired versus nuclear sources. The study's authors conclude that policymakers should look at nuclear power as a low-carbon electricity source, but that utilities will need to have incentives to do so. (2020-02-26)

Uber linked to a reduction in serious road traffic injuries in the UK
A study by University of Oxford researchers, published today in Social Science & Medicine, has found that ride-hailing provider, Uber, is associated with a 9% decline in serious road accident injuries in the UK. However, that relative improvement is counterbalanced by the fact that there was an increase in slight road accident injuries in London. (2020-02-18)

Increased traffic injuries are a surprising result of restricting older drivers
Research from Japan's University of Tsukuba examined impacts of mandated cognitive testing at driver's license renewal for people aged 75+. Such testing aims to identify potentially dangerous drivers and remove them from the road, upon which they may start bicycling or walking. The study found significant increases in traffic injuries among these older unprotected road users. This suggests need for testing that fully considers the safety of older people who lose their permission to drive. (2020-02-05)

Study links daylight saving time to 28 fatal car accidents per year in the US
Several US states have considered doing away with the practice of changing the clocks forward or back in favor of permanent Daylight Saving Time (DST), while experts around the world suggest permanent Standard Time is a better alternative for health and wellbeing. A study appearing Jan. 30 in the journal Current Biology puts forth evidence of another downside of DST: it increases the risk of fatal car accidents for about a week each year. (2020-01-30)

Study shows animal life thriving around Fukushima
Nearly a decade after the nuclear accident in Fukushima, Japan, researchers from the University of Georgia have found that wildlife populations are abundant in areas void of human life. (2020-01-06)

Fukushima: Lessons learned from an extraordinary case of soil decontamination
Following the accident at the Fukushima nuclear power plant in March 2011, the Japanese authorities decided to carry out major decontamination works in the affected area, which covers more than 9,000 km2. On Dec. 12, 2019, with most of this work having been completed, the scientific journal SOIL of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) is publishing a synthesis of approximately 60 scientific publications that provide an overview of the decontamination strategies used and their effectiveness. (2019-12-12)

New research seeks to improve safety equipment for pregnant women
As technology advances in the things we use every day, it's generally accepted they also become safer. But according to one UBC engineer, that may not be true for a large portion of the population. New research from UBC's Okanagan campus has developed a innovative model to map the impact of trauma on a pregnant woman and her uterus if she were involved in an accident--with the hopes of making everything from airbags to seatbelts safer for all. (2019-12-11)

Nuclear reactors with a newly proposed barrier could've withstood Chernobyl and Fukushima
To regain public confidence in nuclear power -- a sustainable source of renewable energy, as well as bridging the gap between what we know today and what is going on in practice, scientists propose a new safety barrier to be implemented in large reactors around the world. The new barrier, described in the open-access journal Nuclear Energy and Technology, could reduce the probability of core melt to that of a large meteorite hitting the site. (2019-11-26)

'I Snapchat and drive!'
Researchers from the Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety-Queensland (CARRS-Q) at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) surveyed drivers aged 17 to 25 and found one in six used the social app Snapchat while behind the wheel. (2019-10-18)

Darn you, R2! When can we blame robots?
A recent study finds that people are likely to blame robots for workplace accidents, but only if they believe the robots are autonomous. (2019-10-17)

Distribution of highly radioactive microparticles in Fukushima revealed
New method allows scientists to create a quantitative map of radioactive cesium-rich microparticle distribution in soils collected around the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP). This could help inform clean-up efforts in Fuksuhima region. (2019-10-16)

Future intent: Would you let an automated car do the driving?
Researchers have surveyed more than 2000 drivers across Australia, France and Sweden for two separate studies investigating what people think about travelling in automated cars. The first international study found French drivers were more likely to one day buy an automated car than drivers in Australia or Sweden. The second study surveyed local Queensland drivers and identified what they saw as the pros and cons of letting a car drive itself. (2019-10-07)

Seeing is believing: Eye-tracking technology could help make driving safer
'Keep your eyes on the road.' With the recent advances in vehicle-assisted safety technology and in-car displays, this old adage has a new meaning, thanks to two new applications of eye-tracking technology developed by researchers at the University of Missouri. (2019-09-24)

Sticks and stones may break your bones, but this reaction edits skeletons
Marcos G. Suero and his research group at the Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) present a new reaction that allows for the edition of organic molecule's skeletons, opening up new avenues of research. (2019-09-13)

Personal protective equipment most critical to safety of seafarers
A new article published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal investigates the causes of these injuries and accidents and finds that injury reduction campaigns focused on personal protective equipment (PPE) would be most effective at reducing risks to workers. (2019-08-26)

Mysterious release of radioactive material uncovered
In September 2017, a slightly radioactive cloud moved across Europe. The reason was not a reactor accident, but an accident in a nuclear reprocessing plant. The exact origin of the radioactivity is difficult to determine, but the data suggests a release site in the southern Urals. This is where the Russian nuclear facility Majak is located. The incident never caused any kind of health risks for the European population. (2019-07-29)

Hit your head, lose your sense of smell
People who suffer even a mild concussion can find it difficult to identify smells in the day that follows, and have anxiety problems a year later, a Canadian study finds. (2019-07-23)

When you spot 1 driving hazard, you may be missing another
When people notice one traffic hazard, they are less likely to see a simultaneous second hazard, according to new research from North Carolina State University. The finding has potential applications for both driver training and the development of automated, in-vehicle safety technologies. (2019-07-22)

Homeless people are denied basic health care, research finds
A study led by the University of Birmingham, UK, has painted a shaming picture of neglect and discrimination shown towards the homeless when accessing UK health services. (2019-07-15)

Are self-driving cars really the answer for older drivers?
New study highlights the delay and deterioration in driving when older drivers have to 'take-back' control of their vehicle in difficult conditions. (2019-07-03)

Heart failure, stroke greater among occupants in motor vehicle accidents
New research has shown that in older adults (65 and older), being an occupant in an automobile during a motor vehicle accident may lead to heart failure or stroke, as compared to pedestrians who are involved in motor vehicle accidents. (2019-05-23)

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