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Smart intersections could cut autonomous car congestion
A new study by Cornell researchers developed a first-of-its-kind model to control traffic and intersections in order to increase autonomous car capacity on urban streets of the future, reduce congestion and minimize accidents. (2019-12-16)

New study looks at motorized scooter injuries
More than half of people who received X-rays or CT scans after electric scooter accidents were found to have injuries, most commonly to the upper extremities, according to a new study. Researchers said the findings underscore the need for more public education on the use of these scooters. (2019-12-03)

Bio-inspired hydrogel can rapidly switch to rigid plastic
A new material that stiffens 1,800-fold when exposed to heat could protect motorcyclists and racecar drivers during accidents. (2019-12-03)

Daylight Saving Time has long-term effects on health
The annual transition to and from daylight saving time (DST) has clinical implications that last longer than the days where clocks 'fall back' or 'spring forward.' (2019-11-04)

Public blame accidents on drivers more than their automated cars when both make mistakes
The public are more likely to blame accidents involving semi-autonomous cars on driver -- rather than machine -- error, a new study has found. (2019-10-28)

Researchers develop platform for scalable testing of autonomous vehicle safety
In the race to manufacture autonomous vehicles (AVs), safety is crucial yet sometimes overlooked as exemplified by recent headline-making accidents. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to improve the safety of autonomous technology through both software and hardware advances. (2019-10-25)

Study: Tradeoffs between commute time, safety
Urban commuters may be less likely to encounter automobile accidents if they are willing to increase trip time, researchers report. A new study from the University of Illinois introduces a tool that helps quantify the connection between traffic accidents and city road networks. (2019-10-22)

Darn you, R2! When can we blame robots?
A recent study finds that people are likely to blame robots for workplace accidents, but only if they believe the robots are autonomous. (2019-10-17)

Tractor overturn prediction using a bouncing ball model could save the lives of farmers
Overturning tractors are the leading cause of death for farmers around the world. In order to reduce the rate of overturned tractors, researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan have developed a model for understanding the conditions that lead to a tractor overturning from an unlikely source: They based their model on one used to understand the unpredictability of a bouncing ball. (2019-09-25)

Seeing is believing: Eye-tracking technology could help make driving safer
'Keep your eyes on the road.' With the recent advances in vehicle-assisted safety technology and in-car displays, this old adage has a new meaning, thanks to two new applications of eye-tracking technology developed by researchers at the University of Missouri. (2019-09-24)

Over one-fifth of injured US adult cyclists were not wearing a helmet -- new study
Men and ethnic minorities are less likely to wear cycle helmets and more likely to suffer from head and neck injuries in accidents, according to new research published in Brain Injury. (2019-09-13)

Groovy! These grooved patterns better mitigate shock waves
A team of engineers at UC San Diego has discovered a method that could make materials more resilient against massive shocks such as earthquakes or explosions. They found that cutting small grooves in obstacle materials diminished the impacts of what's called the reflected shock wave--once the initial wave has hit the spiral of obstacles and bounced back. (2019-09-13)

Single traumatic brain injury can have long-term consequences for cognition
A single incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to long-lasting neurodegeneration, according to a study of 32 individuals. (2019-09-04)

Personal protective equipment most critical to safety of seafarers
A new article published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal investigates the causes of these injuries and accidents and finds that injury reduction campaigns focused on personal protective equipment (PPE) would be most effective at reducing risks to workers. (2019-08-26)

Simple blood test unmasks concussions absent on CT scans
Many patients with concussion have normal CT scans and are discharged from the hospital without follow-up. But a blood test that is currently under development and costs a fraction of the price of a brain scan may flag concussion in these CT-negative patients, enabling them to be evaluated for long-term complications. (2019-08-23)

Psychology can help prevent deadly childhood accidents
Injuries have overtaken infectious disease as the leading cause of death for children worldwide, and psychologists have the research needed to help predict and prevent deadly childhood mishaps, according to a presentation at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association. (2019-08-10)

Study: Sizzling Southwest summers can cause pavement burns in seconds
When temperatures in the Southwestern US climb to over 100 degrees, the pavement can get hot enough to cause second-degree burns in seconds. In a new study, a team of UNLV School of Medicine surgeons reviewed pavement burn admissions into a Las Vegas area burn center over five years. The team compared the outdoor temperatures at the time of each patient admission to, in essence, determine how hot is too hot. (2019-07-26)

Castor oil-based inhibitors to remove gas hydrate plugs in Arctic deposits
The castor-based waterborne polyurea/urethanes (CWPUUs) were synthesized on the basis of the waterborne technique. The high-pressure autoclave cell and high-pressure micro-differential scanning calorimeter using methane gas were applied to evaluate the inhibition performance of CWPUUs as an inhibitor for methane gas hydrate formation. (2019-07-08)

Ridehailing services may be driving up traffic deaths
The arrival of ridehailing is associated with an increase of approximately 3 percent in the number of motor vehicle fatalities and fatal accidents, according to research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. (2019-07-08)

BioSA -- Bridging the gap with biodegradable metals
The University of Malta has teamed up with Mater Dei Hospital to address the shortcomings of current bone scaffolds on the market in a project entitled Biodegradable Iron for Orthopaedic Scaffold Applications -- BioSA. (2019-07-01)

UQ researcher carving a new path for skier safety
A spectacular stack on a ski slope in Canada has led to a University of Queensland researcher determining a simple modification that could improve skier safety on the snow. UQ's Queensland Brain Institute researcher Dr Will Harrison studied visual perception under different lighting conditions to identify a better method for grooming ski runs. (2019-06-17)

Improving driver safety: A standardized look at distraction monitors
A group of scientists in USA has developed the first-ever standardized method of evaluating commercially available driver-monitoring systems. The researchers hope to use their method in a more complex way by incorporating more factors and looking at more scenarios. These include a lighting device that could be used in the lab to simulate real light conditions as well as a few other sites that could enhance the method's accuracy and efficiency even further. (2019-06-05)

Freshwater stingray venom varies according to sex and age
A study by the FAPESP-funded Research, Innovation and Dissemination Center shows that toxins produced by young female stingrays cause more pain, whereas toxins produced by adult stingrays cause tissue necrosis. (2019-06-05)

Heart disease deaths nearly halved in a decade -- but condition remains UK's biggest killer
A new analysis of global heart disease deaths has revealed the number of UK people dying from the condition halved between 2005 and 2015, with the death rate falling from 80 deaths per 100,000 to 46 per 100,000. (2019-06-04)

Fishing among worst jobs for health
People working in the fishing industry have among the poorest health of all workers in England and Wales, new research suggests. (2019-05-30)

Does being seen really make cyclists safer on the road?
Researchers from UBC Okanagan have determined motorists tended to give cyclists wearing high-visibility vests more room on the road, compared to cyclists without high-visibility clothing. The vests, with arrows directing traffic away from pedestrians and cyclists, have shown to reduce the number of traffic accidents involving these groups. (2019-05-28)

Heart failure, stroke greater among occupants in motor vehicle accidents
New research has shown that in older adults (65 and older), being an occupant in an automobile during a motor vehicle accident may lead to heart failure or stroke, as compared to pedestrians who are involved in motor vehicle accidents. (2019-05-23)

New cognitive training game to improve driving skills among the elderly
Researchers at Tohoku University have developed a new cognitive training game aimed at improving road safety among elderly drivers. The game, 'Cognitive Training for Car Driving' (CTCD), requires only a set top box and a TV, and for users to play it regularly. (2019-05-20)

Drexel-developed safety climate scale helps fire departments reach safety goals
A new safety scale, that effectively measures the safety climate of a fire department, has been developed by researchers from Drexel's Dornsife School of Public Health, according to a paper published today in the journal Safety Science. The tool helps fire departments gauge their management and supervisor support for safety initiatives that prevent burnout, poor engagement and low job satisfaction - all attributes that many previous studies have shown can increase injuries and deaths in the line of duty. (2019-05-16)

Falling levels of air pollution drove decline in California's tule fog
The Central Valley's heavy wintertime tule fog -- known for snarling traffic and closing schools -- has been on the decline over the past 30 years, and falling levels of air pollution are the cause, says a new study by scientists at the University of California, Berkeley. The findings help explain the puzzling decades-long rise and fall in the number of 'fog days' affecting the region over the past century. (2019-04-10)

Later school start times significantly reduce teen driving accidents
A new study to be presented at CHEST Congress 2019 Thailand in Bangkok shows a significant decrease in teen driving accidents when school start is delayed. Researchers from Farwaniya Hospital in Kuwait and Boston Children's Hospital studied the impact of a 50-minute delay in high school start times in one of the largest school districts in the US. (2019-04-09)

Traffic accidents involving moose are 13 times more likely to result in human death
More than 500 traffic crashes involving moose occur in northern New England each year, and the injuries sustained by a vehicle's occupants -- because of the height and weight of the animal -- can be far more serious and more likely to result in fatalities than collisions with deer, researchers report. (2019-03-14)

Jury still out on what confers survival advantage in female trauma patients
Female hormones, particularly estrogen, do not seem to explain why women tend to have higher survival rates than men following severe trauma, an 11-year study using data from 815,843 Swedish patients suggests. The findings are published in the open access Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine. (2019-03-14)

The 2008 recession associated with greater decline in mortality in Europe
In recent decades, Europe has experienced a downward trend in the annual number of deaths. Not only was this trend not arrested by the economic recession that started in 2008, in fact, the rate of decline increased during the recession years. This acceleration has been evidenced by the results of a study published in Nature Communications. (2019-02-08)

Study: Fatal opioid-related car crashes in Maryland hold steady over decade
A new approach to defining opioid-related auto fatalities provides insight into the nature and distribution of opioid-involved deaths in the state of Maryland, say the authors of a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2019-02-04)

Does PTSD affect heart disease and cancer risk?
Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was associated with cardiovascular disease and cancer, as well as the metabolic syndrome, in a new study. In the Journal of Neuroscience Research study of 84 individuals diagnosed with PTSD (39 victims of terrorist attacks and 45 victims of other traumatic events), males were more likely to have circulatory and metabolic complications, whereas females had a higher prevalence of benign and malignant cancers. (2019-01-09)

Lab safety, 10 years later
On Dec. 29, 2008, staff scientist Sheri Sangji was working on a chemical synthesis in a lab at the University of California, Los Angeles, when one of the reagents ignited. Sangji's clothes caught fire, causing injuries that led to her death on Jan. 16, 2009, at age 23. Now, a decade later, chemists discuss ongoing efforts to improve academic lab safety in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2019-01-09)

Do large human crowds exhibit a collective behavior?
By observing the collective movement of thousands of Chicago Marathon runners queueing up to the starting line, researchers find that the motion of large crowds is fluid-like and mathematically predictable. (2019-01-03)

Mortality rates rising for Gens X and Y too
Declining life expectancies in the US include Gen X and Y Americans, in addition to the older Baby Boomers. But the causes of premature mortality vary by race, gender and ethnicity, according to a new study from Duke University. The researchers examined data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mortality Multiple Cause Files for the years 1990-2016. (2018-12-19)

Researchers offer perspective on legal, ethical implications of lost eggs and embryos
Three medical and legal scholars discussed the implications of one couple's wrongful death suit seeking compensation for the March 2018 loss at a fertility center of more than 4,000 frozen eggs and embryos. (2018-11-19)

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