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Current Accumulation News and Events, Accumulation News Articles.
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Observation charge accumulation at nanocavity on plasmonic photocatalyst
Understanding where the plasmonic charge accumulated at catalysts surface and how to improve local charge density at catalytic sites is promising for solar energy conversion. Scientists find plasmonic charge accumulation at nanocavity of Au nanoparticle dimer/TiO2 photocatalyst at the single particle level. Such charge accumulation at catalytic sites can significantly accelerate the water oxidation reaction with nearly one order of magnitude enhancement in the photocatalytic activities compared to Au nanoparticles on TiO2. (2020-08-28)

Novel PROTAC enhances its intracellular accumulation and protein knockdown
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine developed an improved type of PROTAC that has enhanced intracellular accumulation and functions, not only as a degrader, but also as an inhibitor of the target protein. (2020-08-26)

To be or not to be in the ER, that is the question
Researchers discovered a new way cells can dispose of misfolded proteins that may help better understand human NGLY1 deficiency. (2020-08-25)

UC Davis researchers reveal molecular structures involved in plant respiration
A study published today (Aug. 25, 2020) in eLife provides the first-ever, atomic-level, 3D structure of the largest protein complex (complex I) involved in the plant mitochondrial electron transport chain. The results could unlock new advances in agriculture. (2020-08-25)

RNA quality control system goes awry in frontotemporal lobar degeneration
Researchers from Osaka University have uncovered that the RNA exosome is critical for the degradation of defective repeat RNA derived from C9orf72 repeat expansions in patients with C9orf72-associated frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The repeat RNA and resultant toxic proteins impaired RNA exosome function, which led to further accumulation of the defective RNA and protein. The findings outline a cycle that may accelerate neurodegeneration. Therapies disrupting the cycle may help treat the disorder. (2020-08-24)

New links found between diabetes blood markers and Alzheimer's disease pathology
A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease provides insight into the association of blood markers of diabetes with brain beta-amyloid accumulation among older people at risk of dementia. The results suggest a link between Alzheimer's pathology, lower levels of insulin and lower insulin resistance. (2020-08-18)

Warming Greenland ice sheet passes point of no return
Nearly 40 years of satellite data from Greenland shows that glaciers on the island have shrunk so much that even if global warming were to stop today, the ice sheet would continue shrinking. (2020-08-13)

IKBFU researchers study the Curonian Spit plants adaptation mechanism
IKBFU Institute of Living Systems biology scientists study protective mechanisms of the Curonian Spit wild plants. The scientists are particularly interested in a beach pea plant (Lathyrus maritimus Bigel). (2020-08-05)

Nanostructures modeled on moth eyes effective for anti-icing
Researchers have been working for decades on improving the anti-icing performance of functional surfaces and work published in AIP Advances investigates a unique nanostructure, modeled on moth eyes, that has anti-icing properties. Moth eyes are of interest because they have a distinct ice-phobic and transparent surface. The researchers fabricated the moth eye nanostructure on a quartz substrate that was covered with a paraffin layer to isolate it from a cold and humid environment. (2020-08-04)

Fatty liver disease despite a normal weight
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba found significant differences in the clinical presentation of non-obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) based on their sex and body mass index. They found that non-obese NAFLD patients had lower muscle mass and strength (pre-sarcopenia) compared to obese NAFLD patients. Further, fat accumulation in muscles was more common among women. These findings help us understand the clinical presentation of NAFLD. (2020-08-03)

Developing a new strategy to selectively deliver therapies to the brain
Developing a new strategy to selectively deliver therapies to the brain (2020-07-26)

AsEH enzyme: A new pharmacological target against Alzheimer's disease
A UB study published in the journal Neurotherapeutics has validated a new pharmacological target for Alzheimer's disease. The results show the inhibition of the enzyme soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) in murine models with the disease reduces the neuroinflammatory process, improving the endogen response of the organism and reducing the neuronal damage and death that cause this type of dementia. (2020-07-24)

What happens around an Alzheimer plaque?
A research team led by Bart De Strooper and Mark Fiers at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Brain & Disease Research in Leuven, Belgium used pioneering technologies to study in detail what happens in brain cells in the direct vicinity of plaques. Their findings, published in the prestigious journal Cell, show how different cell types in the brain work together to mount a complex response to amyloid plaques which is likely protective at first, but later on damaging to the brain. (2020-07-22)

Geoscientists glean data suggesting global climate changes increase river erosion rates
Using cosmogenic nuclide burial dating methods and optically stimulated luminescence dating, geoscientists establish ages for river deposits from the Yukon River basin that span key time periods of global climate change. (2020-07-20)

Combating drug resistance in age-related macular degeneration
An international team of researchers led by Baylor College of Medicine and Houston Methodist has discovered a strategy that can potentially address a major challenge to the current treatment for age-related macular degeneration, (2020-07-16)

Kiwis stockpile paracetamol, the basis of most calls to National Poisons Centre
While paracetamol was the most common substance of enquiry for calls to the National Poisons Centre in 2018, new research reveals most New Zealanders have large quantities of the painkiller stockpiled in their homes. (2020-07-14)

Researchers find promising therapy to fight epidemic of liver disease
In an effort to combat a growing worldwide epidemic of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), scientists have discovered a new target and a new therapy that has shown promising results in preclinical mouse models, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-07-08)

Microplastic pollution accumulates heavily in coastal areas such as fjords and estuaries
Microplastic pollution in marine environments is concentrated most highly in coastal habitats, especially fjords and estuaries, according to a new review article published in the journal Marine Pollution Bulletin. (2020-06-30)

Blood vessels can make you fat, and yet fit
IBS scientists have reported Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) as a key driver that inhibits the accumulation of potbellies by enabling the proper transport of fatty acid into general circulation in blood vessels, thus preventing insulin resistance. Their findings have been published online in the journal Nature Communications (12 June 2020). (2020-06-24)

Research in land plants shows nanoplastics accumulating in tissues
As concern grows among environmentalists and consumers about micro- and nanoplastics in the oceans and in seafood, they are increasingly studied in marine environments, say Baoshan Xing at UMass Amherst and colleagues in China. But little was known about nanoplastics in agricultural soils. Xing and collaborators at Shandong University, China, say that now they have direct evidence that nanoplastics are internalized by terrestrial plants. (2020-06-22)

A fair reward ensures a good memory
By deciphering the neural dialogue between the brain's reward and memory networks, a new study demonstrates that the lasting positive effect of a reward on the ability of individuals to retain a variety of information. (2020-06-17)

New nanoparticle drug combination for atherosclerosis
Physicochemical cargo-switching nanoparticles (CSNP) designed by KAIST can help significantly reduce cholesterol and macrophage foam cells in arteries, which are the two main triggers for atherosclerotic plaque and inflammation. (2020-06-17)

The balancing act between plant growth and defense
Kumamoto University researchers have pinpointed the mechanism that regulates the balance between plant growth and defense. Excessive accumulation of hormones that protect against pathogen infection significantly hinders plant growth. Researchers found that the DEL1 gene plays a role in balancing growth and defense of plants infected with nematodes. This finding is expected to contribute to the improvement of agricultural crop varieties and the identification of infection mechanisms of various pathogens. (2020-06-16)

Sleep, death and ... the gut?
A new study finds a causal link between sleep deprivation and death. In sleep-deprived fruit flies, death is preceded by the accumulation of molecules known as reactive oxidative species in the gut. When fruit flies were given antioxidant compounds that neutralize ROS, sleep-deprived flies remained active and had normal lifespans. The findings may one day inform new approaches to counteract the harmful effects of insufficient sleep in humans. (2020-06-04)

'Excretion of sugar into stool'? New action of anti-diabetic drug discovered
A research team led by Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine's Professor OGAWA Wataru and Project Associate Professor NOGAMI Munenobu has discovered that metformin, the most widely prescribed anti-diabetic drug, causes sugar to be excreted in the stool. Taking advantage of the new bio-imaging apparatus PET-MRI, they revealed that metformin promotes the excretion of blood sugar from the large intestine into the stool. This is a completely new discovery that was not previously anticipated. (2020-06-03)

New therapy for triple negative breast cancer
Researchers at the Principe Felipe Research Center (CIPF), the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), CIBER-BBN and the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB) of Barcelona have inhibited tumor growth and reduced metastasis, as well as the toxicity of the antitumor drug Navitoclax in preclinical animal models of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). (2020-05-25)

Additional genetic cause for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease discovered
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the leading cause of chronic liver disease in Europe and the United States. DZD researchers have now discovered new genes that play a role in the development of fatty liver. In humans and mice, respectively, the genes IRGM, Ifgga2 and Ifgga4 are responsible for the production of regulatory proteins of the family of immunity-related GTPases which counteract fat accumulation in the liver. The results have now been published in the Journal of Hepatology. (2020-05-19)

Advanced X-ray technology tells us more about Ménière's disease
The organ of balance in the inner ear is surrounded by the hardest bone in the body. Using synchrotron X-rays, researchers at Uppsala University have discovered a drainage system that may be assumed to play a major role in the onset of Ménière's disease, a common and troublesome disorder. These results are published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2020-05-19)

A new brick in the wall: Bacterial cell wall intermediate found
An accumulation of an unexpected intermediate of the peptidoglycan recycling pathway that is able to modulate the synthesis and structure of the cell wall, has been found by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden. (2020-05-18)

A new compound removes senescent cells and reduces toxicity in cancer treatment
Researchers at CIBER-BBN, the Universitat Politècnica de València, the Principe Felipe Research Center and the University of Cambridge confirm the therapeutic potential of using a new conjugated drug, Nav-Gal, in combination with chemotherapy. (2020-05-05)

Data from 2 space lasers comprehensively estimate polar ice loss and sea level rise
Ice sheet losses from Greenland and Antarctica have outpaced snow accumulation and contributed approximately 14 millimeters to sea level rise over 16 years (2003 to 2019), a new analysis of data from NASA's laser-shooting satellites has revealed. (2020-04-30)

Proteasome phase separation for destruction
Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (TMiMS) discovered proteasome-containing droplets, which are formed by acute hyperosmotic stress. The proteasome droplets also contain ubiquitin-tagged proteins and multiple interacting proteins, by which induce liquid-liquid phase separation of the proteasome for rapid degradation of unwanted proteins. The ubiquitin-dependent proteasome phase separation may be linked to clearance of aggregates that causes neurodegenerative diseases. These results were published in Nature. (2020-04-27)

Discovered the physiological mechanisms underlying the most common pediatric Leukemia
Researchers from the Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute unveil the mechanisms that lead to hyperdiploid Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Hyper D-ALL, the most common pediatric B-cell Leukaemia. (2020-04-23)

Breastfeeding may lead to fewer human viruses in infants
Even small amounts of breastmilk strongly influences the accumulation of viral populations in the infant gut and provides a protective effect against potentially pathogenic viruses, according to researchers who examined hundreds of babies in a study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (2020-04-14)

UCI-led study finds modifiable risk factors could play a role in Alzheimer's disease
Amyloid is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease, but the accumulation of these sticky proteins may not be the only risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published this week. (2020-04-08)

Dams in the upper Mekong River modify nutrient bioavailability downstream
Chen et al. shed new light on the effects of hydropower dams on nutrient cycling and ecosystem functioning. The study on the cascade reservoirs along the upper Mekong River demonstrated that hydropower reservoirs increased downstream bioavailability of nitrogen and phosphorus, stimulated phytoplankton abundance and shifted the dominant species from diatoms in the silicon-rich upstream channel to green algae in downstream reservoirs. (2020-03-17)

Treated wastewater may safe for aquaculture -- Ben-Gurion University researchers
A new study in aquaculture by researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev has determined that organic micropollutants (OMPs) in the water - trace elements of heavy metals, pharmaceuticals and personal care products as well as pesticides, solvents, and detergents - result in minimal accumulation in fish. Additionally, the wastewater does not appear to affect other commercially important traits of fish. (2020-03-13)

Gene variants may increase susceptibility to accumulate Alzheimer's protein tau
The toxic protein tau is a key biological feature in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease. Yet the factors that make people susceptible or resistant to tau accumulation are not well-understood. A preliminary Mayo Clinic study shows that inherited DNA variants may be associated with developing tau deposits in older adults. The research will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto April 25-May 1. (2020-03-03)

Possible new treatment strategy for fatty liver disease
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a molecular pathway that when silenced could restore the normal function of immune cells in people with fatty liver disease. The findings could lead to new strategies for treating the condition, which is a major health risk for people with obesity. The study is published in the scientific journal Science Translational Medicine. (2020-02-26)

Subtle decline in cognition predicts progression to Alzheimer's pathology
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine report that abnormal levels of beta-amyloid plaques in brain predict cognitive decline and higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, but also that cognitive performance predicts progression from normal to abnormal levels of beta-amyloid. (2020-02-14)

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