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Current Accumulation News and Events, Accumulation News Articles.
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New gene mutation associated with Fabry cardiomyopathy
The A143T variant of the GLA gene is associated with an increased risk of Fabry cardiomyopathy, according to a new study. The variant plays a role in lipid metabolism. According to the researchers, patients carrying the mutation and manifesting changes in the heart should initiate treatment to prevent the disease from progressing. (2020-02-13)

New aspects of globular glial tauopathy could help in the design of more effective drugs
This study, led by Dr. Isidre Ferrer, has described that protein inclusions that damage neurons and glial cells are responsible for the pathology showed by globular glial tauopathy patients. Likewise, these inclusions are composed of different types of proteins, and not only by tau. Moreover they can travel through neurons and glial cells spreading the damage. (2020-01-27)

TP53 gene variant in people of African descent linked to iron overload, may improve malaria response
In a study by Wistar and collaborators, a rare, African-specific variant of the TP53 gene called P47S causes iron accumulation in macrophages and other cell types and is associated with poorer response to bacterial infections, along with markers of iron overload in African Americans. Macrophage iron accumulation disrupts their function, resulting in more severe bacterial infections. (2020-01-24)

Reelin reverts the main pathological processes related to Alzheimer's and other tauopathy
Promoting the signalling pathway of reelin -an essential extracellular protein for the neuronal migration and synaptic plasticity- could be an effective therapeutical strategy to counterbalance the main cognitive, biochemical and behavioural alterations seen in Alzheimer's and other pathologies associated with Tau protein, as shown in a new study with animal models -published in the journal Progress in Neurobiology. (2020-01-23)

West Nile virus triggers brain inflammation by inhibiting protein degradation
West Nile virus (WNV) inhibits autophagy -- an essential system that digests or removes cellular constituents such as proteins -- to induce the aggregation of proteins in infected cells, triggering cell death and brain inflammation (encephalitis), according to Hokkaido University researchers. (2020-01-23)

Human exposure to aluminum linked to familial Alzheimer's disease
A new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (JAD) supports a growing body of research that links human exposure to aluminum with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Researchers found significant amounts of aluminum content in brain tissue from donors with familial AD. The study also found a high degree of co-location with the amyloid-beta protein, which leads to early onset of the disease. (2020-01-20)

Less active infants had greater fat accumulation, study finds
Less physical activity for infants below one year of age may lead to more fat accumulation which in turn may predispose them to obesity later in life, suggests a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2020-01-16)

New study shows 'organic' wounds improve produce
Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists found benefits of insect leaf-wounding in fruit and vegetable production. Stress responses created in the fruits and vegetables initiated an increase in antioxidant compounds prior to harvest, making them healthier for human consumption. (2020-01-09)

Study finds losing a night of sleep may increase blood levels of Alzheimer's biomarker
A preliminary study by researchers at Uppsala University has found that when young, healthy men were deprived of just one night of sleep, they had higher levels of tau -- a biomarker for Alzheimer's disease -- in their blood than when they had a full, uninterrupted night of rest. The study is published in the medical journal Neurology. (2020-01-08)

Objective subtle cognitive difficulties predict amyloid accumulation and neurodegeneration
Researchers report that accumulating amyloid protein occurred faster among persons deemed to have 'objectively-defined subtle cognitive difficulties' (Obj-SCD) than among persons considered to be 'cognitively normal,' offering a potential new early biomarker for Alzheimer's disease. (2019-12-31)

What comes first, beta-amyloid plaques or thinking and memory problems?
The scientific community has long believed that beta-amyloid, a protein that can clump together and form sticky plaques in the brain, is the first sign of Alzheimer's disease. Beta-amyloid then leads to other brain changes including neurodegeneration and eventually to thinking and memory problems. But a new study challenges that theory. The study suggests that subtle thinking and memory differences may come before, or happen alongside, the development of amyloid plaques that can be detected in the brain. (2019-12-30)

Caffeine may offset some health risks of diets high in fat, sugar
In a study of rats, University of Illinois scientists found that caffeine limited weight gain and cholesterol production, despite a diet that was high in fat and sugar. Lead author was U. of I. alumna Fatima J. Zapata. Co-authors were nutritional sciences professor Manabu T. Nakamura; Elvira Gonzalez de Mejia, director of the Division of Nutritional Sciences; and animal sciences professor Jan E. Novakofski. (2019-12-19)

Natural ecosystems protect against climate change
The identification of natural carbon sinks and understanding how they work is critical if humans are to mitigate global climate change. Tropical coastal wetlands are considered important but, so far, there is little data to show the benefits. This study, led by the University of Göttingen showed that mangrove ecosystems need to be conserved and restored as part of the battle against rising carbon levels in the atmosphere. The research was published in Global Change Biology. (2019-12-10)

A new therapeutic target against diseases caused by lipid accumulation in cells
Researchers from the University of Barcelona (UB) and the August Pi i Sunyer Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBAPS) found a new molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of the cholesterol movement in cells, an essential process for a proper cell functioning. (2019-12-02)

Decision-making process becomes visible in the brain
Transparent fish larvae reveal how a decision makes its way through the brain. (2019-12-02)

New clues about the origins of familial forms of Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
A Brazilian study made important progress in understanding the accumulation of one of the proteins involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Scientists were able to gain insight into the interaction between normal and mutant forms of a protein known as superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1). The process alters protein accumulation in the cell, but also impairs the function of Sod1 protein, thus contributing to the development of the disease. (2019-12-02)

The mechanism of programmed aging: The way to creation a real remedy for senescence
The mechanism of programed aging points the way to achieving unlimited healthy life: it is necessary to develop a means for managing bioenergetics. More concrete, we have to modify mitochondrial mechanism that controls the [ATP]/[ADP] level. It has already been substantially studied by molecular biologists and is now waiting for researchers from gerontology. (2019-11-25)

Scientists identify underlying molecular mechanisms of Alexander disease
UNC School of Medicine researchers are learning about the differences in the underlying biology of patients with severe and milder forms of Alexander disease, a rare neurodegenerative condition that is often fatal to young children. Led by Natasha Snider, PhD, assistant professor of cell biology, an international group of scientists has discovered that the mutant form of GFAP undergoes different chemical modifications, depending on time of onset of symptoms. (2019-11-21)

A study warns about the ecological impact caused by sediment accumulation in river courses
Insects, crustaceans and other water macroinvertebrates are more affected by the effect of sediment accumulation in river courses than the excess of nitrate in water environments, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE. Sediments that get accumulated in rivers -- due intensive agriculture and deforestation in gallery forests- alter the ecological traits of fluvial habitats and deteriorate the biological communities at all levels. (2019-11-13)

Too much sugar doesn't put the brakes on turbocharged crops
Plants make sugars to form leaves to grow and produce grains and fruits through the process of photosynthesis, but sugar accumulation can also slow down photosynthesis. Researching how sugars in plants control photosynthesis is therefore an important part of finding new ways of improving crop production. Recent research into highly productive turbocharged crops such as maize and sorghum, show the secret to their productivity could lie in their sugar-sensing responses which regulate photosynthesis inside their leaves. (2019-11-11)

How hot (and not-so-hot) compounds in chili peppers change during ripening
Anyone who has tasted a hot chili pepper has felt the burn of capsaicinoids, the compounds that give peppers their spiciness, as well as possible health benefits. Related pepper compounds, called capsinoids, have similar properties, minus the heat, so they are attractive as potential functional food ingredients and supplements. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have measured amounts of both compounds in three types of chili peppers as they ripen. (2019-11-06)

New way to date rocks
A new way to date a common mineral could help pinpoint ore deposits and improve mineral exploration globally, according to University of Queensland scientists. (2019-11-03)

Key gene in familial Alzheimer's disease regulates neuronal development
An international team of researchers led by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona describes a new route that promotes differentiation of neurons. The discovery demonstrates that there is a common mechanism between the neurodegeneration occurring in Alzheimer's and the proliferation of cancer cells. (2019-10-30)

Human activities boosted global soil erosion already 4,000 years ago
Soil erosion reduces the productivity of ecosystems, it changes nutrient cycles and it thus directly impacts climate and society. An international team of researchers, including Professor Pierre Francus at the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS), recorded temporal changes of soil erosion by analyzing sediment deposits in more than 600 lakes worldwide. They found that the accumulation of lake sediments increased significantly on a global scale around 4,000 years ago. (2019-10-29)

How Alzheimer's disease spreads through the brain
Tau can quickly spread between neurons but is not immediately harmful, according to research in mouse neurons published in JNeurosci. Intervening during the initial accumulation of tau could potentially halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease. (2019-10-28)

Information theory as a forensics tool for investigating climate mysteries
During Earth's last glacial period, temperatures on the planet periodically spiked dramatically and rapidly. A new paper in the journal Chaos suggests that mathematics from information theory could offer a powerful tool for analyzing and understanding these mysterious events. (2019-10-16)

RUDN University soil scientists found out how abandoned arable land restores
Soil scientists from RUDN University have found that the rate of accumulation of organic carbon in wild, cultivated, and abandoned soils depends mainly on the type and composition of the soil, and, to a lesser extent, on the time elapsed since it was no longer cultivated. This data will help more accurately calculate soil fertility and the total amount of carbon on the planet, as well as predict climate change. The results are published in the journal Geoderma. (2019-10-15)

Plant death may reveal genetic mechanisms underlying cell self-destruction
Hybrid plants, which produced by crossing two different types of parents, often die in conditions in which both parents would survive. Certain hybrid tobacco plants, for example, thrive at 36 degrees Celsius, but die at 28 degrees Celsius, which is the temperature at which both parents would thrive. Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan have begun to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which hybrid tobacco plant cells meet their demise. (2019-10-10)

Mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest revealed
A research group led by Prof. MA Keping from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Institute of Microbiology, have now revealed the underlying mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest. (2019-10-09)

Antipsychotics linked to accumulation of hospital days in persons with Alzheimer's disease
People with Alzheimer's disease who used antipsychotic drugs had a higher number of accumulated hospital days than people with Alzheimer's disease who did not use antipsychotics, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The results were published in the Journal of American Medical Directors Association. During a two-year follow-up, persons who initiated antipsychotic drugs accumulated approximately eleven more hospital days per person-year. (2019-10-07)

Study pinpoints Alzheimer's plaque emergence early and deep in the brain
By scanning whole brains of Alzheimer's model mice from an early age, researchers were able to precisely trace the terrible march of amyloid plaques from deep brain structures outward along specific circuits. They also showed that plaque density in a key region in humans scales with disease stage. (2019-10-04)

Scientists discover interaction between good and bad fungi that drives forest biodiversity
Researchers from the University of Maryland and the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that the type of beneficial soil fungi living around tree roots determined how quickly the trees accumulated harmful, pathogenic fungi as they grew and could play a key role in determining forest biodiversity. (2019-10-03)

Vaping-associated lung injury may be caused by toxic chemical fumes, study finds
Research into the pathology of vaping-associated lung injury is in its early stages, but a Mayo Clinic study published in The New England Journal of Medicine finds that lung injuries from vaping most likely are caused by direct toxicity or tissue damage from noxious chemical fumes. (2019-10-02)

Predicting cancer versus autism risk in PTEN patients
In a new study published in American Journal of Human Genetics, a team of researchers led by Charis Eng, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of Cleveland Clinic's Genomic Medicine Institute, identified a metabolite that may predict whether individuals with PTEN mutations will develop cancer or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). (2019-09-26)

Disrupting key protein alters biological rhythms in water flea
The E75 protein is a key regulator of some biological rhythms through interactions with nitric oxide. Suppression of E75 results in longer molt cycles and reduced numbers of offspring in the water flea, Daphnia magna. The work also raises questions about the ability of nitric oxide from environmental sources to disrupt biological rhythms that are critical to population sustainability. (2019-09-19)

Markey researchers discover role of nuclear glycogen in non-small cell lung cancers
Researchers at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center have made a breakthrough discovery that solves a mystery long forgotten by science and have identified a potentially novel avenue in pre-clinical models to treat non-small cell lung cancers. (2019-09-12)

Type 2 diabetes is not just about insulin
Obesity, by promoting the resistance to the action of insulin, is a major risk factor of diabetes. Insulin imbalance may not be the only cause of the onset of diabetes. Researchers (UNIGE) have highlighted another mechanism: the liver appears to have the ability to produce a significant amount of glucose outside of any hormonal signal. In patients with excess liver fat, this overproduction of glucose could lead to type 2 diabetes, regardless of hormonal circuits. (2019-09-11)

Women's deep belly fat more strongly linked to diabetes and cardiovascular diseases
A comprehensive study from Uppsala University, with over 325,000 participants, shows that deep belly fat is a major contributing risk factor for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The study also shows that deep belly fat is a larger risk factor in women compared to men. Moreover, the scientists investigated how our genes affect the accumulation of fat and present a new, simpler method to estimate the amount of deep belly fat. (2019-09-09)

Single traumatic brain injury can have long-term consequences for cognition
A single incidence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to long-lasting neurodegeneration, according to a study of 32 individuals. (2019-09-04)

Breast cancer gene a potential target for childhood liver cancer treatment
Hepatoblastoma is a rare liver cancer that mainly affects infants and young children and is associated with mutations in the β-catenin gene. Researchers from Osaka University screened uncharacterized targets of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and confirmed that breast cancer gene GREB1 plays a major role in hepatoblastoma cell proliferation. By interfering with GREB1 protein production, tumor formation was inhibited in a mouse liver cancer model, suggesting this approach could be used to develop a targeted hepatoblastoma therapy. (2019-09-03)

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