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University of Minnesota researchers develop two new rapid COVID-19 diagnostic tests
University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have developed two new rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 - one to detect COVID-19 variants and one to help differentiate with other illnesses that have COVID-19-like symptoms. (2021-02-23)

High-throughput screening for Weyl semimetals with S4 symmetry
A new topological invariant χ is defined in systems with S4 symmetry to diagnose the existence of Weyl fermions. By calculating χ, the computational cost for searching Weyl semimetals is greatly reduced. Recently, Gao et al. implemented this method in the high-throughput screening and found a lot of new Weyl semimetal candidates with exotic properties, providing realistic platforms for future experimental study of the interplay between Weyl fermions and other exotic states. (2021-02-23)

3D biopsies to better understand brain tumors
Researchers at the Institut de Neurociències of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (INc-UAB) obtained a highly accurate recreation of human glioblastoma's features using a novel 3D microscopy analysis. The study, published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, provides new information to help with the diagnose, by finding therapeutical targets and designing immunotherapeutical strategies. (2021-02-19)

Differences in walking patterns could predict type of cognitive decline in older adults
Canadian researchers are the first to study how different patterns in the way older adults walk could more accurately diagnose different types of dementia and identify Alzheimer's disease. (2021-02-16)

Researchers discover promising biomarkers to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury
Certain plasma microRNAs could serve as diagnostic biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The biomarkers were discovered in an animal model and they were successfully used also to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury in a subgroup of patients. (2021-02-15)

A new perceptually-consistent method for MSI visualization
Skoltech scientists have proposed a Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) method leveraging the unique features of human vision (2021-02-11)

How accurate are first impressions on a first date?
The high stakes of first dates require would-be partners to make and interpret first impressions. But, can we rely on these first impressions to accurately assess someone's personality? According to researchers from McGill University, the answer is yes, although it may be more difficult than in more casual settings. (2021-02-09)

Machine learning could aid mental health diagnoses
A way of using machine learning to more accurately identify patients with a mix of psychotic and depressive symptoms has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2021-02-08)

In survey of those with uncontrolled asthma, half smoked cannabis
A new survey in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows that of those who used cannabis, about half smoked it while a third vaped - both 'inhalation routes' likely to affect one's lungs. (2021-02-02)

VCU technology could upend DNA sequencing for diagnosing certain DNA mutations
Doctors are increasingly using genetic signatures to diagnose diseases and determine the best course of care, but using DNA sequencing and other techniques to detect genomic rearrangements remains costly or limited in capabilities. However, an innovative breakthrough developed by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Department of Physics promises to diagnose DNA rearrangement mutations at a fraction of the cost with improved accuracy. (2021-01-27)

Borderline personality disorder: Don't ignore it
Borderline Personality Disorder is treatable. New University of Houston research is the first to show that adolescent borderline pathology follows a similar downward course after discharge from inpatient treatment previously demonstrated for adults. (2021-01-25)

Personalizing cancer care with improved tumor models
While decades of research have resulted in substantial improvements in surviving cancer, a key challenge remains in identifying new drugs that improve outcomes for patients. In APL Bioengineering, researchers suggest a major hurdle is the paucity of models for cancer research that accurately represent patient tumors. They provide a perspective on strategies using models from individual patients and where the field needs to go in terms of research in animal systems and in culture systems. (2021-01-21)

World's first test to accurately predict depression and bipolar disorder
University of South Australia scientists have developed the world's first test to accurately predict mood disorders in people, based on the levels of a specific protein found in the brain. (2021-01-18)

Ferrofluid surface simulations go more than skin deep
Computer models efficiently and accurately simulate the magnetic responses of ferrofluids by considering only the fluid's surface. (2021-01-10)

Majority of media stories fail to label 'preprint' COVID-19 research -- study
A new SFU-led study finds that less than half of media stories in early 2020 featuring COVID-19 ''preprint'' research--research that has not yet been peer-reviewed--accurately framed the studies as being preprints or unverified research. (2021-01-05)

Are two phases of quarantine better than one?
The importance of strict quarantine has been widely debated during the COVID-19 epidemic. The public debate on lockdown strategy raises the question of whether it is better to have a two-phase lockdown (a strict lockdown followed by a relaxation of restrictions) or a single, softer quarantine policy (the Swedish model). (2020-12-23)

Researchers discover brain pattern that could improve mental health disorder diagnosis
A pattern in how the brain breaks down tryptophan, a common amino acid consumed through food, was discovered by researchers at UTHealth. (2020-12-17)

Losing money causes plastic changes in the brain
Researchers at the HSE Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience have shown experimentally that economic activity can actively change the brain. Signals that predict regular financial losses evoke plastic changes in the cortex. Therefore, these signals are processed by the brain more meticulously, which helps to identify such situations more accurately. The article was published in Scientific Reports. (2020-12-15)

AI that detects post-stroke depression type can help stroke survivors get right treatment
An AI might soon help stroke survivors get the right treatment by detecting a patient's post-stroke depression type, a frequently seen neuropsychiatric manifestation after a stroke that could impair functional recovery. (2020-12-14)

UMBC researchers use machine learning to develop more accurate COVID-19 diagnostic tool
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a method of generating high-quality chest X-ray images that can be used to diagnose COVID-19 more accurately than current methods. (2020-12-10)

Trained dogs might be able to detect people infected with COVID-19 by sniffing their sweat
Trained dogs might be able to detect people infected with COVID-19 by sniffing their sweat, according to a preliminary proof-of-concept study. (2020-12-10)

Development of high-speed nanoPCR technology for point-of-care diagnosis of COVID-19
Researchers at IBS invented a new diagnostic method for COVID-19, called nanoPCR (2020-12-08)

Novel form of Alzheimer's protein found in spinal fluid indicates stage of the disease
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found a novel form of the Alzheimer's protein tau in the fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. This form of tau -- known as MTBR tau -- indicates what stage of Alzheimer's a person is in and tracks with tangles of tau protein in the brain. (2020-12-07)

Iron deficiency can be managed better
Publishing in The Lancet, Australian and European researchers have released updated, evidence-based guidance for managing iron deficiency, a serious worldwide health problem. Iron deficiency is a major cause of anaemia, a lack of oxygen-carrying red blood cells or haemoglobin, which is experienced by two billion people worldwide, and can have serious long-term health consequences. Implementing the best practice diagnosing and managing iron deficiency would lead to significant long-term health benefits. (2020-12-04)

New lab-on-a-chip infection test could provide cheaper, faster portable diagnostics
A tiny new silicon-based lab-on-chip test could pave the way for cheap handheld infectious disease testing. (2020-12-02)

AI predicts which drug combinations kill cancer cells
A machine learning model developed in Finland can help us treat cancer more effectively. (2020-12-01)

Next step in simulating the universe
Researchers led by the University of Tsukuba developed a way to accurately represent the behavior of elementary particles called neutrinos in computer simulations of the Universe. The simulation results reveal the effects of neutrinos on the formation and growth of galaxies for different values of the uncertain neutrino mass. The work marks a milestone in simulating the Universe and could help determine the neutrino mass. (2020-12-01)

Simple measurement could transform injury rehabilitation
Researchers from Edith Cowan University in Western Australia have found a simple way to analyse the effectiveness of exercise training that could one day be conducted easily at a local gym or physio. Using vertical jumps as a test activity, the researchers could predict detailed information regarding technique and muscle activation patterns just through a relatively simple analysis of forces produced against the ground during the jump. (2020-11-19)

Diagnosing the cause of exercise-induced respiratory symptoms
Exercise?induced respiratory symptoms are common in childhood, and it can be difficult to diagnose their cause. A study published in Pediatric Pulmonology found that the diagnoses proposed by primary care physicians are often not the same as the final diagnoses after specialist referrals. (2020-11-18)

Motorized sensors aim to improve and speed up early-stage disease diagnosis
Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering want to make it easier to catch diseases earlier in the process, improving patient outlooks and taking some of the load off the medical system. (2020-11-18)

UIC researchers describe fundamental processes behind movement of magnetic particles
Researchers from the University of Illinois Chicago describe several fundamental processes associated with the motion of magnetic particles through fluids as they are pulled by a magnetic field. (2020-11-18)

Retinas: New potential clues in diagnosing, treating Alzheimer's
A study led by the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery has identified certain regions in the retina - the lining found in the back of the eye - that are more affected by Alzheimer's disease than other areas. The findings may help physicians predict changes in the brain as well as cognitive deterioration, even for patients experiencing the earliest signs of mild impairment. (2020-11-17)

Rapid test can ID unknown causes of infections throughout the body
UC San Francisco scientists have developed a single clinical laboratory test capable of zeroing in on the microbial miscreant afflicting patients hospitalized with serious infections in as little as six hours -- irrespective of what body fluid is sampled, the type or species of infectious agent, or whether physicians start out with any clue as to what the culprit may be. (2020-11-10)

Study confirms spit testing may help doctors diagnose concussions
Doctors may soon be able to more accurately diagnose concussions by measuring the number of certain molecules in a person's saliva, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The results of a recent clinical study confirmed that a patient's spit may be used to aid concussion diagnosis in a non-invasive, non-biased fashion. (2020-11-09)

Radical diagnostic could save millions of people at risk of dying from blood loss
Engineers at Monash University in Australia have developed a fast, portable and cheap diagnostic that can help deliver urgent treatment to people at risk of dying from rapid blood loss. This portable diagnostic measures fibrinogen concentration in blood. (2020-10-29)

18F-Fluciclovine PET/MRI for prostate cancer staging, androgen deprivation evaluation
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology, fluorine-18-labeled fluciclovine PET/MRI demonstrated utility in the initial staging of high-risk prostate cancer, as well as for evaluating the response to androgen deprivation therapy. Given the FDA approval and widespread availability of 18F-fluciclovine, the findings could have impact in the immediate future in guiding initial management of patients with prostate cancer. (2020-10-27)

Diagnosing Parkinson's disease with skin samples could lead to earlier detection
New research shows a simple skin test can accurately identify Parkinson's disease, which could lead to earlier detection of the disease and better outcomes for patients. Currently, Parkinson's disease is diagnosed by clinical signs and symptoms but only definitively diagnosed at autopsy. The researchers conducted a blinded study of 50 skin samples using an assay originally designed to detect mad cow disease. (2020-10-21)

Standalone D-dimer test strategy may simplify diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis
New research suggests that it may be possible to simplify the diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) without compromising accuracy. Contrary to the standard practice of administering several tests to diagnose DVT, using only a D-dimer blood test may help health care providers identify patients who require additional screening, according to a new study in Blood Advances. (2020-10-15)

Researchers take issue with study evaluating an AI system for breast cancer screening
In a new perspective piece 'Transparency and reproducibility in artificial intelligence' published this week in the journal Nature, an international group of scientists including CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) Associate Professor Levi Waldron raised concerns about the lack of transparency in publication of artificial intelligence algorithms for health applications. (2020-10-14)

Novel software assesses phonologial awareness
Understanding sounds in language is a critical building block for child literacy, yet this skill is often overlooked. Researchers from Michigan State University have developed a new software tool to assess children's phonological awareness -- or, how they process the sound structure of words. (2020-10-14)

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