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Northern white rhino eggs successfully fertilized
After successfully harvesting 10 eggs from the world's last two northern white rhinos, Najin and Fatu, on August 22nd in Kenya, the international consortium of scientists and conservationists announces that 7 out of the 10 eggs (4 from Fatu and 3 from Najin) were successfully matured and artificially inseminated. This was achieved through ICSI (Intra Cytoplasm Sperm Injection) with frozen sperm from two different northern white rhino bulls, Suni and Saut, on Sunday, August 25th. (2019-08-26)

Thanks to a world record in tomography, synchrotron radiation can be used to watch how metal foam forms
An international research team at the Swiss Light Source (SLS) has set a new tomography world record using a rotary sample table developed at the HZB. With 208 three-dimensional tomographic X-ray images per second, they were able to document the dynamic processes involved in the foaming of liquid aluminium. The method is presented in the journal Nature Communications. (2019-08-21)

Breakthrough in understanding of magnetic monopoles could signal new technologies
A breakthrough in understanding how the quasi-particles known as magnetic monopoles behave could lead to the development of new technologies to replace electric charges. (2019-08-14)

Greater blood pressure control linked to better brain health
For adults with high blood pressure, greater blood pressure control than what's currently considered standard is associated with fewer adverse changes of the brain, which could mean lower risks of dementia and cognitive impairment, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (2019-08-13)

New study finds independent predictors of first pass effect in mechanical thrombectomy
A new study, presented today at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery's (SNIS) 16th Annual Meeting, found that non-internal carotid artery (non-ICA) site of occlusion, the use of a balloon-guided catheter, and better collateral grade were all independent predictors of the first pass effect (FPE). (2019-07-22)

Scientists create new 'y-shaped' synthetic consortium for efficient bio-manufacturing
A group of Chinese scientists have recently developed a new synthetic consortium for efficient pentose-hexose co-utilization that could improve bio-manufacturing. (2019-07-08)

An innovative electron microscope overturning common knowledge of 88 years history
In conventional electron microscopes, performing atomic-resolution observations of magnetic materials is particularly difficult because high magnetic fields are inevitably exerted on samples inside the magnetic objective lens. Newly developed magnetic objective-lens system provides a magnetic-field-free environment at the sample position. This enables direct, atom-resolved imaging of magnetic materials such as silicon steels. This novel electron microscope is expected to be extensively used for the research and development of advanced magnetic materials. (2019-06-11)

3D microchannels promote self-assembly of ordered emulsions at low droplet concentrations
SUTD researchers have discovered a way to achieve self-assembly of low density droplets in microfluidic flows using three dimensional (3D) microchannels. (2019-06-06)

Green material for refrigeration identified
Researchers from the UK and Spain have identified an eco-friendly solid that could replace the inefficient and polluting gases used in most refrigerators and air conditioners. (2019-04-18)

Avoidance or responsible moral choices -- what is your supervisor like?
It is important to understand and prevent unethical behavior in working life. Leaders should be able to take responsibility for challenging situations and show commitment to moral values. A recent study at the University of Jyvaskyla charted the different moral identity statuses among Finnish leaders. (2019-03-21)

Gearing up for 5G: A miniature, low-cost transceiver for fast, reliable communications
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have designed a 28 GHz transceiver that integrates beamforming with dual-polarized multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) technology. Measuring just 3 mm by 4 mm, this tiny transceiver could help improve performances of fifth-generation cellular network (5G) and Internet of Things (IoT) devices. (2019-02-18)

Learning a second alphabet for a first language
A part of the brain that maps letters to sounds can acquire a second, visually distinct alphabet for the same language, according to a study of English speakers published in eNeuro. The research challenges theoretical constraints on the range of visual forms available to represent written language. (2019-02-11)

Ingestible injections made possible by a tortoise-inspired drug delivery device
A new ingestible device, inspired by the self-orienting shape of the leopard tortoise's shell, may soon be used to administer drugs by injecting them through the stomach wall. (2019-02-07)

Groundbreaking new reusable adhesive works underwater
Illinois researchers have introduced a new cutting-edge reusable adhesive that activates in seconds, works underwater, and is strong enough to deadlift 11 pounds: shape memory polymers (SMPs). (2019-01-28)

Researchers create road map of care for children with severe head trauma
PEGASUS is the first comprehensiveĀ care model forĀ children with head trauma, said lead researcher Monica Vavilala, director of Harborview's Injury Prevention and Research Center in Seattle. (2019-01-23)

Application of nanosized LiFePO4 modified electrode to electrochemical sensor & biosensor
The aim of this paper was to construct nanosized LFP modified electrodes, which could be applied as working electrode for rutin analysis and as an electrochemical biosensor for direct electrochemistry of Hemoglobin (Hb). (2019-01-10)

Strong interactions produce a dance between light and sound
Light and high-frequency acoustic sound waves in a tiny glass structure can strongly couple to one another and perform a dance in step. (2018-12-21)

Researchers use a virus to speed up modern computers
Researchers have successfully developed a method that could lead to unprecedented advances in computer speed and efficiency. (2018-12-04)

A new approach to automation of chemical synthesis
Researchers have used a robotic platform to produce -- with no physical intervention -- three pharmaceutical compounds with yields and purities comparable to those achieved by manual efforts, they say. (2018-11-29)

Gold nanoparticle microsecond tracking with atomic-level localization precision achieved
Gold nanoparticles have been used as an optical probe of high-localization precision, high-speed single-molecule tracking of protein molecular motors. With newly developed dark-field microscopy, researchers in Institute for Molecular Science, Japan, have achieved gold nanoparticle tracking with atomic-level angstrom localization precision and microsecond time resolution. Detailed motion of kinesin, a dimeric linear molecular motor, has been precisely captured at 10 microsecond time resolution, consistent with unidirectional 'rotation' of two heads of kinesin during linear motion. (2018-11-28)

Next step on the path towards an efficient biofuel cell
Fuel cells that work with the enzyme hydrogenase are, in principle, just as efficient as those that contain the expensive precious metal platinum as a catalyst. However, the enzymes need an aqueous environment, which makes it difficult for the starting material for the reaction -- hydrogen -- to reach the enzyme-loaded electrode. Researchers solved this problem by combining previously developed concepts for packaging the enzymes with gas diffusion electrode technology. (2018-11-14)

Tetris: It could be the salve for a worried mind
The venerable video game Tetris was used in a recent experiment to create a state of 'flow' -- the term psychologists use to describe a state of mind so engaged it makes the rest of the world fall away, and time pass more quickly. UCR researcher Kate Sweeny and her team have found that state of perfect disengagement may improve the otherwise-emotionally unpleasant experience of awaiting uncertain news. The participants who achieved flow - those in the adaptive group - experienced less negative emotion. (2018-10-25)

Study reveals large regional variations on future trends of diabetes dependent on if obesity rates are tackled
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) in Berlin looks into the rising prevalence of both obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) around the world and estimates the population that will likely be affected by both conditions over the coming decades. (2018-10-03)

Diversity in the brain -- how millions of neurons become unique
How is it possible that so many different and highly specific neurons arise in the brain? A mathematic model developed by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum demonstrates that different variants of genes enable such a random diversity. The scientists describe in Cell Reports that despite countless numbers of newly formed neurons, the genetic variants equip neurons individually and precisely for their specific function. (2018-09-25)

Generic direct acting antivirals in treatment of chronic hepatitis C patients
There has been published results of the study 'ORIGINAL VERSUS GENERIC DIRECT ACTING ANTIVIRALS IN TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEPATITIS C PATIENTS: REAL LIFE DATA FROM LATVIA' authored by Tolmane I, Rozentale B, Arutjunana S et al., recently. (2018-07-19)

Nanodiamond turns into controllable light source
A research group from ITMO University first time in the world developed a controlled light source based on nanodiamond. Experiments have shown that diamond shell doubles the emission speed light sources and helps to control them without any additional nano- and microstructures. This was achieved due to artificially created defects in a diamond crystal lattice. Obtained results are important for the development of quantum computers and optical networks. The work is published in the Nanoscale. (2018-05-02)

Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells
Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS. (2018-04-16)

Can pursuing happiness make you unhappy?
Researchers have found that people who pursue happiness often feel like they do not have enough time in the day, and this paradoxically makes them feel unhappy. Aekyoung Kim of Rutgers University in the US and Sam Maglio of the University of Toronto Scarborough in Canada have investigated this effect in a study in the journal Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, which is published by Springer and is an official journal of the Psychonomic Society. (2018-03-12)

Genetic analysis can improve depression therapy
The failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Diakonhjemmet Hospital in Norway published in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Prescribing the dose of escitalopram based on a patient's specific genetic constitution would greatly improve therapeutic outcomes. (2018-01-12)

California's water saving brings bonus effects
Water-saving measures in California have also led to substantial reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and electricity consumption in the state. That is the conclusion of new research from the University of California, Davis, published today in the journal Environmental Research Letters. (2018-01-11)

Ditch plan to disregard all athletic world records before 2005, urge experts
The proposal by the European Athletics Council to disregard all athletic world records set before 2005 should be abandoned, insist experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. (2017-12-07)

Booze and pot use in teens lessens life success
Young adults dependent on marijuana and alcohol are less likely to achieve adult life goals, according to new research by UConn Health scientists presented November 5 at the American Public Health Association 2017 Annual Meeting & Expo. (2017-11-05)

Pill for glycemic control for type 2 diabetes shows promise
Among patients with type 2 diabetes, the drug semaglutide taken by pill resulted in better glycemic control than placebo over 26 weeks, findings that support phase 3 studies to assess longer-term and clinical outcomes, as well as safety, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-10-17)

Researchers implement entanglement swapping with independent sources over 100km optical fiber
A group of scientists led by Prof. ZHANG Qiang and PAN Jianwei from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) have successfully demonstrated entanglement swapping with two independent sources 12.5 km apart using 103 km optical fiber. (2017-10-11)

Chemists make playdough/Lego-like hybrid to create tiny building blocks
Playdough and Legos are among the most popular childhood building blocks. But what could you use if you wanted to create something really small -- a structure less than the width of a human hair? It turns out, a team of chemists has found, this can be achieved by creating particles that have both playdough and Lego traits. (2017-09-18)

Physicists observe amplification of an optical signal within cubic nonlinear nanostructures
The coherent amplification of a localized optical signal within a planar titanium nitride nanoantenna has been achieved by scientists of Kazan Federal University (under the leadership of Sergey Kharintsev) and physicists from Harvard University, Nazarbayev University, and Imperial College London. The results have been recently published in Nano Letters. (2017-09-12)

Texting while parenting: Mobile program improves safety of sleeping infants
Mother's latest little helper is already in her pocket: A new educational intervention delivered in the form of texts and emails has been found to increase adherence to safe sleep practices for infants, concluded researchers at the Yale, University of Virginia, and Boston University schools of medicine in a joint study published July 25 in the Journal of the American Medical Association. (2017-08-07)

Oral bacteria may help forensic scientists estimate time since death
Accurately determining the time since death is an important aspect of forensic sciences and casework. (2017-08-01)

On-chip pumps achieve high-speed sorting of large cells
Nagoya University research developed a high-speed cell sorting method of large cells with high-viability using dual on-chip pumps. The microfluidic chip has three-branched microchannels. Target cells are sorted into one of two interest channels by the high-speed flow produced by the on-chip pumps, while non-target cells enter a waste channel without pump actuation. The technique overcomes the limitation of many on-chip cell sorting methods in achieving the sorting of large cells at a high throughput. (2017-07-28)

Delaying bariatric surgery until higher weight may result in poorer outcomes
Obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery were more like to achieve a body mass index (BMI) of less than 30 one year after surgery if they had a BMI of less than 40 before surgery, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery. (2017-07-26)

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