Current Achievement Scores News and Events

Current Achievement Scores News and Events, Achievement Scores News Articles.
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Focus on the positive to improve classroom behavior
When teachers encounter disruptive or noncompliant students in the classroom, they typically respond by focusing on the negative behavior. (2021-02-22)

Hospital hygiene: A closer look reveals realistic frequency of infection
A research team led by Inselspital, Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern found a correlation between the frequency of infections after surgery and performance in quality audits. Lower surgical site infection rates correlate with a lower audit score. In other words, looking more closely reveals more reported infections. Recommendations for possible correction are presented. (2021-02-18)

Social tool tracks brand reputation in real time and over the long term
An international team of researchers has developed a tool for assessing brand reputation in real time and over time. In a demonstration that looked at leading brands, the researchers found that changes in a given brand's stock shares reflected real-time changes in the brand's reputation. (2021-02-18)

Study: Preschoolers with higher cardiorespiratory fitness do better on cognitive tests
Researchers report that 4-6-year-old children who walk further than their peers during a timed test - a method used to estimate cardiorespiratory health - also do better on cognitive tests and other measures of brain function. Published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine, the study suggests that the link between cardiorespiratory fitness and cognitive health is evident even earlier in life than previously appreciated. (2021-02-18)

Genomic test helps estimate risk of prostate cancer metastasis, death
A commercially available genomic test may help oncologists better determine which patients with recurrent prostate cancer may benefit from hormone therapy, according to new research from the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and 15 other medical centers. (2021-02-11)

Low-income middle-aged African-American women with hypertension are likely to suffer from depression
Low-income middle-aged African-American women with high blood pressure very commonly suffer from depression and should be better screened for this serious mental health condition. (2021-02-11)

Mediterranean-style diet linked to better thinking skills in later life
People who eat a Mediterranean-style diet--particularly one rich in green leafy vegetables and low in meat--are more likely to stay mentally sharp in later life, a study shows. Closely adhering to a Mediterranean diet was associated with higher scores on a range of memory and thinking tests among adults in their late 70s, the research found. The study found no link, however, between the Mediterranean-style diet and better brain health. (2021-02-10)

Human eye beats machine in archaeological color identification test
A ruler and scale can tell archaeologists the size and weight of a fragment of pottery - but identifying its precise color can depend on individual perception. So, when a handheld color-matching gadget came on the market, scientists hoped it offered a consistent way of determining color, free of human bias. (2021-02-09)

Book developed at Cincinnati Children's helps identify risks of reading difficulties
A study published in the journal Pediatrics expands validation evidence for a new screening tool that directly engages preschool-age children during clinic visits to assess their early literacy skills. The tool, which is the first of its kind, has the potential to identify reading difficulties as early as possible, target interventions and empower families to help their child at home, according to researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. (2021-02-04)

Special Issue: Human genome at 20
In February 2001, the first drafts of the human genome were published. (2021-02-04)

State-funded pre-K may enhance math achievement
Students who attend the Georgia Prekindergarten Program are more likely to achieve in mathematics than those who do not attend pre-K, according to a new study by the University of Georgia. (2021-02-03)

CCNY researchers demonstrate how to measure student attention during remote learning
The Covid-19 pandemic has made home offices, virtual meetings and remote learning the norm, and it is likely here to stay. But are people paying attention in online meetings? Are students paying attention in virtual classrooms? Researchers Jens Madsen and Lucas C. Parra from City College of New York, demonstrate how eye tracking can be used to measure the level of attention online using standard web cameras, without the need to transfer any data from peoples computers, thus preserving privacy. (2021-01-29)

Automated AI algorithm uses routine imaging to predict cardiovascular risk
Investigators teamed up to develop and evaluate a deep learning system that may help change this. The system automatically measures coronary artery calcium from CT scans to help physicians and patients make more informed decisions about cardiovascular prevention. (2021-01-29)

'Be a man': Why some men respond aggressively to threats to manhood
When their manhood is threatened, some men respond more aggressively than others. New research from Duke University suggests who may be most triggered by such threats - younger men whose sense of masculinity depends heavily on other people's opinions. ''The more social pressure a man feels to be masculine, the more aggressive he may be,'' said Adam Stanaland, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology and public policy at Duke and the study's lead author. (2021-01-28)

How fellow students improve your own grades
Better grades thanks to your fellow students? A study conducted by the University of Zurich's Faculty of Business, Economics and Informatics has revealed that not only the grade point average, gender and nationality peers can influence your own academic achievement, but so can their personalities. Intensive contact and interaction with persistent fellow students improve your own performance, and this effect even endures in subsequent semesters. (2021-01-20)

Need to reduce work-related stress? It's a walk in the park
Research from the University of Tsukuba examined the relationship between ''sense of coherence'' (a quality indicative of stress-coping ability) and frequency of walking in forests or greenspaces. The aim was to find easy coping devices for workplace stress. Forest/greenspace walking at least once a week was found to correlate with those with a stronger sense of coherence. The findings suggest the benefits of walking in urban greenspaces or in forests to help with stress management. (2021-01-13)

Scoring system to redefine how U.S. patients prioritized for liver transplant
Researchers with Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine are collaborating with faculty at the University of Pennsylvania to develop a risk score that more comprehensively prioritizes liver cancer patients for transplantation. (2021-01-13)

Youth with family history of suicide attempts have worse neurocognitive functioning
Children and adolescents with a family history of suicide attempts have lower executive functioning, shorter attention spans, and poorer language reasoning than those without a family history, according to a new study by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The study is the largest to date to examine the neurocognitive functioning of youth who have a biological relative who made a suicide attempt. (2021-01-11)

COVID-19 and dental and dental hygiene students' career plans
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted dental education and training. The study ''COVID-19 and Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Career Plans,'' published in the JDR Clinical & Translational Research (JDR CTR), examined the short-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dental hygiene and dental students' career intentions. (2021-01-07)

Multi-population risk scores could improve risk prediction for inflammatory bowel diseases, study finds
New study illustrates how studying diverse populations can help predict patient outcomes and reduce health disparities (2020-12-24)

COVID-19 isolation hurting women more than men
A study by University of Calgary researchers with the Hotchkiss Brain Institute examining sex and gender differences on sleep, empathy and mood during months of isolation due to COVID-19 has found that women are suffering more than men with poorer sleep and more anxiety, depression and trauma, while also feeling more empathetic than men. (2020-12-22)

Why an early start is key to developing musical skill later in life
Is there, as some have suggested, a developmental period early in life when the brain is especially receptive to musical training? The answer, according to new research published in the journal Psychological Science, is probably not. (2020-12-22)

'Race norming' blamed for denying payouts to ex-NFL players with dementia
A UCSF clinical psychologist has taken aim at the National Football League (NFL) for ''race norming'' black players diagnosed with dementia, a practice that is depriving them of the monetary awards allocated to former footballers with neurodegenerative disorders. (2020-12-21)

Pregnant women whose exercise routines disrupted by COVID-19 show higher depression scores
The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted daily life, including many people's ability to exercise, which can boost mood, reduce stress and benefit one's physical and mental health. A Dartmouth study finds that pregnant women whose exercise routines were impacted by the pandemic have higher depression scores than those who have continued to exercise as usual. The study, whose findings are published in PLOS ONE, is among the first to examine the links between COVID-19, exercise changes and prenatal depression. (2020-12-21)

How hope can make you happier with your lot
New research finds that that having hope for the future can make you happier with your lot - and protect you from risky behaviours such as drinking and gambling. (2020-12-16)

Better heart health scores in midlife linked to lower risk of late-life dementia
A long-term study of 1,449 people in Finland found that those who had better scores on standard metrics of cardiovascular health in midlife, especially for behavioral factors such as smoking, had a lower risk of dementia later in life. Yajun Liang of Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine. (2020-12-15)

Study: teacher performance measures may penalize Black educators
By not adjusting for school and classroom factors outside the control of educators, classroom observation scores for Black teachers in Chicago Public Schools unfairly penalize them for being more likely to teach in schools in low-income neighborhoods with students who are academically disadvantaged, according to a study published today in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2020-12-10)

Study: Teacher performance measures may penalize black educators
By not adjusting for school and classroom factors outside the control of educators, classroom observation scores for Black teachers in Chicago Public Schools unfairly penalize them for being more likely to teach in schools in low-income neighborhoods with students who are academically disadvantaged, according to a study published today in Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Educational Research Association. (2020-12-10)

Postmenopausal women with early-stage BC/low recurrence score could skip adjuvant chemo
After a median follow-up of 5.1 years, among women with lymph node-positive early-stage breast cancer and a recurrence score of 25 or lower who received adjuvant endocrine therapy with or without chemotherapy, postmenopausal patients had no added benefit from chemotherapy, while premenopausal patients who received chemotherapy had improved invasive disease-free survival (IDFS) and an early indication of improved overall survival (OS), according to data from the SWOG S1007 RxPONDER clinical trial. (2020-12-09)

PET/MRI, CT metrics assess pathologic response of pancreas cancer to neoadjuvant therapy
According to an open-access Editor's Choice article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), post-neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) changes in metabolic metrics from PET/MRI and morphologic metrics from CT were associated with pathologic response and overall survival in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). (2020-12-09)

Significant increase in depression seen among children during first UK lockdown
The first lockdown led to a significant increase in symptoms of depression among children, highlighting the unintended consequences of school closures, according to a new study from the University of Cambridge. (2020-12-08)

Kidney injury in diabetic ketoacidosis linked to brain injury
Researchers have identified factors that make children with diabetic ketoacidosis more likely to experience acute kidney injury. Analyzing data from a large, multicenter clinical trial, the researchers also found that children who experience acute kidney injury are more likely to also experience subtle cognitive impairment and demonstrate lower IQ scores, suggesting a pattern of multiple organ injury. (2020-12-04)

Study highlights strategies for boosting accuracy of personal genetic risk scores
As the consumer genetics industry rapidly expands, more and more people are turning to DNA-based services to learn their risk of developing a wide range of diseases. However, the risk scores from these genetic tests are not always as precise as they could be, according to a new study from Scripps Research. The scientists examine many approaches to calculating the scores and recommend that personal genomics organizations adopt standards that will raise the bar for accuracy. (2020-12-03)

Older adults with dementia exhibit financial 'symptoms' up to six years before diagnosis
A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the Federal Reserve Board of Governors found that Medicare beneficiaries who go on to be diagnosed with dementia are more likely to miss payments on bills as early as six years before a clinical diagnosis. (2020-11-30)

Study shows strong links between music and math, reading achievement
Music educator Martin J. Bergee thought that if he could just control his study for the myriad factors that might have influenced previous ones - race, income, education, etc. -- he could disprove the notion of a link between students' musical and mathematical achievement. Nope. His new study, published in the Journal of Research in Music Education, showed statistically significant associations between the two at both the individual and the school-district levels. (2020-11-30)

Air pollution spikes linked to lower test scores for Salt Lake County third graders
More frequent exposure to air pollution spikes were associated with reduced test scores for third graders in Salt Lake County. Schools with a higher proportion of students of color and from households experiencing poverty were exposed to more peak pollution days than were schools serving middle- to upper- class and predominately white students. The results stress the need for legislators to enact policies to reduce the number of peak pollution days. (2020-11-30)

New breakthrough in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis
People with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) could soon benefit from a new drug treatment, otilimab, that not only suppresses inflammation but also significantly reduces patient reported pain scores. (2020-11-25)

High achievement cultures may kill students' interest in math -- especially for girls
In countries where academic performance in math is high, students paradoxically tend to have lower levels of interest in the subject. A recent study suggests that this effect is even stronger among girls, potentially explaining why they tend to do slightly less well at math than their male peers in high-achieving countries. (2020-11-25)

Differences in well-being amongst Somali, Latino and Hmong adolescents
U of M School of Nursing researchers found that acculturation was positively associated with substance use and negatively with academic achievement in adolescence. (2020-11-23)

Spill-over effects show prioritising education of very poorest improves attainment of all
International development projects that target the education of the world's very poorest children also significantly improve other young people's attainment, University of Cambridge research indicates. The findings are based on a study of a programme targeting marginalised girls in Tanzania, which showed the attainment of other boys and girls at these pupils' schools significantly improved through 'spill-over' effects. For every $100 spent per girl, all students made the equivalent of two years of learning gains. (2020-11-19)

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