Current Achilles Tendon News and Events

Current Achilles Tendon News and Events, Achilles Tendon News Articles.
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Individual differences in Achilles tendon shape can affect susceptibility to injury
Individual variation in the shape and structure of the Achilles tendon may influence our susceptibility to injury later in life, says a study published today in eLife. (2021-02-16)

Study identifies 'Achilles heel' of bacteria linked to Crohn's disease
The discovery of an ''Achilles heel'' in a type of gut bacteria that causes intestinal inflammation in patients with Crohn's disease may lead to more targeted therapies for the difficult to treat disease, according to Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian investigators. (2021-02-05)

'Stealthy' stem cells better for treating tendon injuries in horses
Treating equine donor stem cells with a growth factor called TGF-β2 may allow them to avoid ''tripping'' the immune response in recipients, according to new research. (2021-02-04)

Engineering immunity
University of New Mexico researchers study the use of virus-like particles to create a stable and effective malaria vaccine. (2021-02-03)

90-day vaginal ring shows promise as method for preventing both HIV and pregnancy
A vaginal ring containing the antiretroviral drug dapivirine and the contraceptive hormone levonorgestrel delivered sustained levels of each drug when used continuously for 90 days - levels likely sufficient to serve its dual purpose for protecting against both HIV and unwanted pregnancy, according to results being presented at HIVR4P. The 90-day dual-purpose ring builds on the monthly dapivirine ring, which, if approved, would be the first biomedical HIV prevention method specifically for women. (2021-01-26)

Researchers engineer antibody that acts against multiple SARS-like viruses
Researchers have engineered an antibody that neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 with a potency that 'rivals' current lead SARS-CoV-2 clinical neutralizing antibodies, and that also broadly neutralizes a range of clade 1 sarbecoviruses. (2021-01-25)

Researchers develop virus live stream to study virus infection
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute and Utrecht University developed an advanced technique that makes it possible to monitor a virus infection live. The researchers from the groups of Tanenbaum and Van Kuppeveld expect that the technique can be used to study a wide variety of viruses, including SARS-CoV-2. The technique named VIRIM is very valuable for gaining insights in virus infection in the human body, which can lead to more targeted treatments. (2020-11-13)

Study points way to possible new treatment for ligament injuries
A new exosomes study released in STEM CELLS may lead to future treatment for ligament injuries. (2020-11-03)

Cancer's dangerous renovations to our chromosomes revealed
Cancer remodels the architecture of our chromosomes so the disease can take hold and spread, new research reveals. (2020-10-27)

Materials scientists learn how to make liquid crystal shape-shift
A new 3D-printing method will make it easier to manufacture and control the shape of soft robots, artificial muscles and wearable devices. Researchers at UC San Diego show that by controlling the printing temperature of liquid crystal elastomer, they can control the material's degree of stiffness and ability to contract--known as degree of actuation. What's more, they are able to change the stiffness of different areas in the same material by exposing it to heat. (2020-09-25)

International screening of the effects of a pathogenic fungus
The pathogenic fungus Candida auris, which first surfaced in 2009, is proving challenging to control. It is resistant to many fungicides and not easy to diagnose. Researchers from Radboud university medical center, Canisius-Wilhelmina Hospital (CWZ) and international colleagues have discovered that the human immune system recognizes the fungus well. The study has been able to pin-point the fungus' Achilles heel for new, effective drugs. Meanwhile, the threat posed by this emerging public health pathogen should not be underestimated. (2020-08-28)

Exercise and PRP promising for shoulder pain in wheelchair users with spinal cord injury
''Conservative treatments that provide alternatives to surgery are needed for wheelchair users with spinal cord injury who have recalcitrant shoulder pain. Injection of PRP (platelet-rich plasma), which may promote healing of the injured tendon, combined with a graduated home-based exercise program, is a potential option for these individuals. Based on our pilot study, a larger randomized controlled trial is warranted.'' (2020-07-29)

Healing an Achilles' heel of quantum entanglement
Louisiana State University Associate Professor of Physics Mark M. Wilde and his collaborator have solved a 20-year-old problem in quantum information theory on how to calculate entanglement cost--a way to measure entanglement--in a manner that's efficiently computable, useful, and broadly applicable in several quantum research areas. (2020-07-29)

Oxygen breathes new life into solar cell research
Scientists in Australia and the United States have been able to 'upconvert' low energy light into high energy light, which can be captured by solar cells, in a new way, with oxygen the surprise secret ingredient. The results are published in Nature Photonics today. (2020-07-20)

Antibiotic resistance and the need for personalized treatments
Scientists have discovered that the microbiota of each individual determines the maintenance of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the gut: whereas in some individuals resistant bacteria are quickly eliminated, in others they are not. The study now published in Nature Ecology and Evolution highlights the need to implement more personalized therapies and brings new perspectives to the paradigm of the evolution of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the gut. (2020-07-13)

Total-body PET/CT captures full picture of systemic inflammatory arthritis
For the first time, physicians can examine the systemic burden of inflammatory arthritis simultaneously across all joints and organ systems, using the high-sensitivity, high-resolution uEXPLORER total-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography (TB-PET/CT) scanner. Results of the first in-human TB-PET/CT scans conducted in the arthritic population were presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2020 Virtual Annual Meeting. (2020-07-11)

Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions
Athletes who play contact sports are being particularly hard-hit by the prolonged restrictions imposed on games and training, according to a new study. (2020-07-06)

Irregular findings common in knees of young competitive alpine skiers
Bony lesions on the lower part of the thigh bone near the knee are a common but benign finding on MRI in young alpine skiers and should not be confused with more serious conditions, according to a new study from Switzerland. (2020-06-16)

Researchers may have uncovered the Achilles heel of viruses
A new research study headed by the Department of Biomedicine at Aarhus University, Denmark, identifies how viruses avoid the body's immune system and cause infections and diseases. The new knowledge could pave the way for the treatment of viral diseases such as COVID-19. (2020-05-20)

Major trial shows breast cancer drug can hit prostate cancer Achilles heel
A drug already licensed for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers is more effective than targeted hormone therapy at keeping cancer in check in some men with advanced prostate cancer, a major clinical trial reports. Olaparib, a pill lacking the side effects of chemotherapy, can target an Achilles heel in prostate cancers with a weakness in their ability to repair damaged DNA. (2020-04-28)

Researchers develop synthetic scaffolds to heal injured tendons and ligaments
Top biomedical engineering researcher develops synthetic scaffolds for tendon and ligament regeneration. Previous synthetic tendon grafts have led to poor outcomes and implant rejection. Australia has one of the highest rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the world -- and up to 25 percent of surgeries require revision. (2020-04-14)

Careless cancer cells may be susceptible to future drugs
Could the ability of cancer cells to quickly alter their genome be used as a weapon against malignant tumors? Researchers at Uppsala University have succeeded in developing a substance that has demonstrated promising results in experiments on both animal models and human cancer cells. The study is published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-03-11)

Why runner's addiction is adding to your injury woes
Each week, millions of runners around the world lace up their running shoes, spurred on by the psychological, health and social benefits that running delivers. But new research from the University of South Australia reveals a downside. (2020-03-04)

Mass General Hospital researchers identify new 'universal' target for antiviral treatment
Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital have uncovered a novel potential antiviral drug target that could lead to treatments protecting against a host of infectious diseases. (2020-02-11)

Researchers recommend early walking in a brace for Achilles tendon rupture
A new study from the University of Oxford and the University of Warwick reveals a breakthrough for sportsmen and women in the treatment of Achilles tendon rupture. Researchers found that early walking in a brace provides similar outcomes to plaster casting with no increase in the risk of complications, paving the way for a big change in the way that patients are treated. (2020-02-06)

Finely tuned nervous systems allowed birds and mammals to adopt smoother strides
A study published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, authored by a New York Institute of Technology anatomy professor, suggests that neuromuscular adaptations in mammals and birds may have allowed them to become more nimble than reptiles and amphibians. (2020-01-27)

Pulling the plug on calcium pumps -- potential new treatment strategy for pancreatic cancer
UK scientists have identified a new way to kill pancreatic cancer cells by 'pulling the plug' on the energy generator that fuels calcium pumps on their cell surface. The study, published in the British Journal of Cancer, reports how switching off the cancer's energy supply causes the pancreatic cancer cells to become 'poisoned' by an irreversible build-up of calcium. (2020-01-16)

Beauty sleep could be real, say Body Clock biologists
Biologists from The University of Manchester have explained for the first time why having a good night's sleep really could prepare us for the rigours of the day ahead. (2020-01-15)

Researchers find minimally invasive procedure to treat chronic Achilles tendon disorder improves patient outcomes and reduces recovery time
A minimally invasive procedure to treat a common foot and ankle disorder can reduce pain, recovery time, and postsurgery complications while improving functional outcomes. (2020-01-13)

Otago researchers discover new viral strategy to escape detection
University of Otago researchers have discovered how viruses that specifically kill bacteria can outwit bacteria by hiding from their defences, findings which are important for the development of new antimicrobials based on viruses and provide a significant advance in biological knowledge. (2019-12-09)

Tendon stem cells could revolutionize injury recovery
The buildup of scar tissue makes recovery from torn rotator cuffs, jumper's knee, and other tendon injuries a painful, challenging process, often leading to secondary tendon ruptures. New research reveals the existence of tendon stem cells that could potentially be harnessed to improve tendon healing and even to avoid surgery. (2019-11-25)

Magnesium deprivation stops pathogen growth
When pathogens invade the cells, our body combats them using various methods. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now been able to show how a cellular pump keeps such invading pathogens in check. As the researchers report in ''Science'', this pump causes a magnesium shortage, which in turn restricts bacterial growth. (2019-11-21)

New assessment finds EU electricity decarbonization discourse in need of overhaul
It's well known that the EU is focusing its efforts on decarbonizing its economy. In many respects, Germany's Energiewende personifies the poster child of that effort. Unfortunately, substantial investments in the Energiewende have not yet yielded significant reductions in GHG emissions and political disillusionment has emerged as an unwelcome result. Decarbonization efforts in other European countries risk making similar blunders unless the contemporary EU policy discourse is thoroughly cross-examined. (2019-11-18)

Gadolinium-enhanced MRI improves diagnostic accuracy and predicts polymyalgia rheumatica
According to new research findings presented this week at the 2019 ACR/ARP Annual Meeting, use of gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in shoulders of patients with polymyalgia rheumatica may contribute to more accurate diagnosis and prediction of recurrence. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI displayed capsulitis, rotator cuff tendinitis and focal osteitis in shoulders that was relatively specific to patients with polymyalgia rheumatica. (2019-11-09)

Researchers link specific protein mutations to ataxia disease symptoms
For the first time, the UNC School of Medicine lab of Jonathan Schisler, MS, Ph.D., linked the specific biochemical changes to a protein called CHIP to specific disease characteristics of patients with a wide range of rare disorders. Published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the research shows it is possible to merge analyses of protein biochemistry with patient characteristics to better understand spinocerebellar ataxia autosomal recessive 16, or SCAR16. (2019-11-06)

Achilles heel of tumor cells
In almost all cases of colon cancer, a specific gene is mutated -- this offers opportunities to develop broadly effective therapeutic approaches. Research teams in Würzburg have taken this a step further. (2019-11-05)

Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked 'fabella' knee bone
The once-rare 'fabella' bone has made a dramatic resurgence in human knees, but who's likely to have a fabella or two -- and why? (2019-10-17)

Protective mediators can help heal injured tendon cells by attacking inflammation
Tendon tears, both to the rotator cuff and Achilles heel, are common injuries, especially in aged individuals. Painful and disabling, they can adversely impact quality of life. New approaches are required to help patients suffering from chronic tendon injuries. A novel study in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier, identified mediators that promote resolution of inflammation as potential new therapeutics to push chronically injured tendons down an inflammation-resolving pathway. (2019-10-10)

Step forward in falling research
University of Queensland research shows there is more at play than just a sinking feeling when you stumble during movement or trip in a hole in the ground. (2019-10-01)

HSS researchers identify factor essential for tendon growth
Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) is essential for allowing tendons to adapt to physical activity and grow properly, according to basic science research by investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS). The findings provide a strong rationale for pursuing clinical trials to explore IGF1 as a new target for treating tendon injuries in humans. (2019-09-24)

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