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Current Achilles Tendon News and Events, Achilles Tendon News Articles.
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Spanish researchers find a new promising therapeutic target for glioblastoma
Glioblastoma is the most frequent and aggressive brain cancer due to its ability to escape the immune system. However, the way in which this tumor manages to induce this immune tolerance was not known in detail. A research published in PNAS carried out at the Instituto de Neurociencias UMH-CSIC, in Alicante (Spain), and the IMIB-Arrixaca in Murcia (Spain), has find out in detail how this tumor invade healthy tissue with hardly any resistance, a finding that could become glioblastoma┬┤s Achilles heel. (2019-09-23)

Novel therapy studied for inherited breast cancer
Adding back a tiny molecule, microRNA 223-3p, to BRCA1-mutant cancer cells forces the cancer to die, researchers at UT Health San Antonio discovered. BRCA1-mutant cancer is the type of inherited cancer for which Angelina Jolie had preventive surgery in 2013. (2019-08-27)

Unlocking chemo-resistance in cancer
Associate Professor Hamsa Puthalakath's explanation of why some cancers don't respond to treatment with one of the most effective chemotherapy drugs: 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has the potential to lead to: a lab test to check for 5-FU resistance, which would reduce unnecessary chemotherapy treatments; a new drug to turn off 5-FU in resistance; and he finds 5-FU resistance is linked to a the protein 'BOK,' the function of which has stumped scientists for decades. (2019-07-15)

Lateral extra-articular tenodesis reduces hamstring autograft
The addition of lateral extra-articular tenodesis to a hamstring autograft in knee surgery in young active patients significantly reduces graft failure and persistent anterolateral rotatory laxity at two years post operatively. The research, presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Sports Medicine Society, received the O'Donoghue Sports Injury Award. (2019-07-12)

Does autograft choice in ACL reconstruction affect recurrent ACL revision rates
Young athletes who have anterior cruciate ligament surgery are more likely to need an additional surgery if they received a hamstring graft compared to a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. The research was conducted by group of clinicians led by Dr. Christopher C. Kaeding of Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. (2019-07-12)

The Lancet: Nerve transfer surgery restores hand function and elbow extension in 13 young adults with complete paralysis
Nerve transfer surgery has enabled 13 young adults with complete paralysis to regain movement and function in their elbows and hands, according to the largest case series of this technique in people with tetraplegia (paralysis of both the upper and lower limbs), published in The Lancet. (2019-07-04)

Controlling deadly malaria without chemicals
Scientists have finally found malaria's Achilles' heel, a neurotoxin that isn't harmful to any living thing except Anopheles mosquitoes that spread malaria. (2019-06-28)

Eliminating infamous security threats
Speculative memory side-channel attacks like Meltdown and Spectre are security vulnerabilities in computers. No efficient solutions have been found. Existing solutions only address specific security threats without solving the underlying issue. Now, researchers from University of Murcia, Uppsala University and NTNU have come up with a more appealing solution, which will be presented at the International Symposium on Computer Architecture (ISCA) at the end of June. (2019-06-12)

Young athletes who require ACL reconstruction may benefit from additional procedure
An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, an injury of the knee, can be devastating to a young athlete. While the ACL can be reconstructed through surgery, there is a high risk of re-injury in patients under the age of 25. In the largest clinical trial of its kind, researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute have shown that performing an additional surgical procedure called lateral extra-articular tenodesis (LET) may reduce the risk of ACL re-injury in young athletes. (2019-05-21)

Space travel and your joints
A novel Henry Ford Hospital study of mice aboard a Russian spaceflight may raise an intriguing question for the astronauts of tomorrow: Could traveling in space be bad for your joints? Researchers found early signs of cartilage breakdown in the mice, suggesting that the reduced biomechanical forces of spaceflight are at play on the musculoskeletal system. (2019-05-21)

Potential new therapy takes aim at a lethal esophageal cancer's glutamine addiction
Medical University of South Carolina investigators have exploited a metabolic quirk of certain cancers known as glutamine addiction to identify a potential new therapy for esophageal cancer. After characterizing the pathway involved in cancer progression, they tested a new combination treatment in both cells and animal models, with promising results. The next step is to secure funding to bring the new combination regimen to clinical trial. Their findings are reported in Nature Communications. (2019-05-20)

Circulating tumor DNA gives treatment options for the most common ovarian cancer type
According to a new research, circulating tumor DNA can be used detect treatment options for ovarian cancer patients who don't benefit from chemotherapy. (2019-05-04)

Knit 1, purl 2: Assembly instructions for a robot?
Carnegie Mellon University researchers have used computationally controlled knitting machines to create plush toys and other knitted objects that are actuated by tendons. It's an approach they say might someday be used to cost-effectively make soft robots and wearable technologies. (2019-05-02)

How do muscle and tendon connections last a lifetime?
Muscles are connected to tendons to power animal movements such as running, swimming or flying. During development, these muscle-tendon attachments must be established such that they resist high mechanical forces for the entire life of the animal. An international research team from Marseille (France), M├╝nster and Munich (both Germany) shows now in fruit flies how a protein controls mechanical stress on muscle-tendon connections. The study has been published in the journal PLOS Biology. (2019-04-04)

Searching for better treatments for irritated tendons
Researchers learn what makes tendons fray in old age, knowledge that could help develop better treatments for tendinosis and regrow damaged tissue. (2019-04-02)

Harnessing plant hormones for food security in Africa
Striga is a parasitic plant that threatens the food supply of 300 million people in sub-Saharan Africa. Scientists have found that they can take advantage of Striga's Achilles' Heel: if it can't find a host plant, it dies. The scientists have developed a technique that has potential to reduce the impact of Striga by more than half, helping to safeguard food supplies and farmers' livelihoods. (2019-03-28)

New medication gives mice bigger muscles
Researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, have studied a new group of medicinal products which increase the muscle- and bone mass of mice over a few weeks. This offers hope to the elderly and people suffering from weak muscles and bones due to illness. (2019-03-27)

Even as hospitals cut risky antibiotic use in-house, patients often go home with them
Even as hospitals try to cut back on prescribing powerful but risky antibiotics called fluoroquinolones, a new study shows that many patients still head home with prescriptions for the drugs -- increasing their risk of everything from 'superbug' infections to torn tendons. In fact, the hospitals that are actively trying to reduce inpatient fluoroquinolone use were twice as likely to discharge patients with a new prescription for one of them. (2019-02-13)

Gummy-like robots that could help prevent disease
EPFL scientists have developed microscopic, hydrogel-based muscles that can manipulate and mechanically stimulate biological tissue. These soft, biocompatible robots could be used for targeted therapy and to help diagnose and prevent disease. (2019-02-08)

Study unlocks full potential of 'supermaterial' graphene
New research reveals why the 'supermaterial' graphene has not transformed electronics as promised, and shows how to double its performance and finally harness its extraordinary potential. (2018-11-29)

Study links shoulder ultrasound brightness with type 2 diabetes
Henry Ford Hospital researchers may have unknowingly happened on a new predictor of type 2 diabetes as part of a new ultrasound shoulder study. The predictor may be an ultrasound of the deltoid muscle, which researchers found appears much brighter on diabetic patients than on obese nondiabetic patients. (2018-11-19)

A novel strategy to potentially reduce breast cancer bone metastasis
Uncovering a novel mechanism that promotes growth of breast cancer bone metastasis has revealed a potential Achilles' heel for these cancer cells. (2018-11-12)

First trial of dapivirine ring with both ARV and contraceptive finds no safety concerns
In the first clinical study of a vaginal ring that releases the antiretroviral drug dapivirine as well as a contraceptive hormone, there were no safety concerns and the ring was well-tolerated. The ring is designed to provide protection against both HIV infection and unintended pregnancy for 90 days at a time. Given the encouraging results, researchers have already launched a second Phase I trial of the dual-purpose ring. (2018-10-24)

New model mimics human tumors for accurate testing of cancer drugs
Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers have genetically engineered a new laboratory model that enables accurate testing of anti-cancer drugs by mimicking the complexity of human cancers. Using this advanced model, researchers will be able to discover the safest and most effective ways to use promising drugs called MCL-1 inhibitors in the clinic. (2018-10-11)

The fine print
University of Utah biomedical engineering assistant professor Robby Bowles and his team have developed a method to 3D print cells to produce human tissue such as ligaments and tendons to greatly improve a patient's recovery. A person with a badly damaged ligament, tendon, or ruptured disc could simply have new replacement tissue printed and ultimately implanted in the damaged area. (2018-10-10)

Ciprofloxacin has dramatic effects on the mitochondrial genome
A study carried out at the University of Eastern Finland and published in Nucleic Acids Research investigated the effect of ciprofloxacin on mitochondria, the important cell organelles in our body that produce the energy for cellular function. Ciprofloxacin stopped normal maintenance and transcription of mitochondrial DNA by changing mtDNA topology, causing impaired mitochondrial energy production and blocking cellular growth and differentiation. (2018-10-01)

Nano-sandwiching improves heat transfer, prevents overheating in nanoelectronics
Sandwiching two-dimensional materials used in nanoelectronic devices between their three-dimensional silicon bases and an ultrathin layer of aluminum oxide can significantly reduce the risk of component failure due to overheating, according to a new study published in the journal of Advanced Materials led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Engineering. (2018-09-12)

How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant
Maize plants release secondary metabolites into the soil that bind to iron and thereby facilitate its uptake by the plant. The Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), the economically most important maize pest worldwide, is attracted by these complexes, extracts the bound iron from the maize plant and uses it for its own nutrition. With these insights, researchers provide a new explanation for the extraordinary success of the Western corn rootworm as a global maize pest. (2018-08-16)

New method makes spinning collagen microfibres quicker, cheaper, and easier
Scientists in Norfolk, VA (USA) have developed a new method of making collagen microfibres, which could have applications in research, medical devices and clinical treatments ranging from ligament damage to skin burns. (2018-08-14)

Elastic slingshot powers snipefish feeding
The snipefish, an ocean-dwelling relative of the seahorse, has a very long, skinny snout ending in a tiny mouth. A recent study by UC Davis graduate student Sarah Longo shows that snipefish feed with an elastic-boosted head flick at almost unprecedented speed. (2018-07-23)

Results for female ACL graft repair methods differ among younger athletes, say researchers
Female athletes are two to eight more times likely to injure their ACL than males, however utilizing one graft repair treatment method in females may be more beneficial than another, according to researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's (AOSSM) Annual Meeting in San Diego. (2018-07-05)

A new tactic for starving tumors
Scientists have found a metabolic particularity in tumor cells that are low on oxygen. The discovery might point to new drugs to target the most difficult-to-treat spots within a tumor. (2018-06-25)

Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle & tendon tissue engineering
New research describes the development of a novel screening platform with automated production of 3D muscle- and tendon-like tissues using 3D bioprinting. (2018-06-13)

Surgical technique improves sensation, control of prosthetic limb
An MIT study describes first human implementation of a surgical technique that improves a patient's sensation and control of a prosthetic limb. (2018-05-30)

Future wearable device could tell how we power human movement
For athletes and weekend warriors alike, returning from a tendon injury too soon often ensures a trip right back to physical therapy. However, a new technology developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers could one day help tell whether your tendons are ready for action. (2018-04-24)

Virulence switch in 'Iraqibacter': potential Achilles heel?
Microbiologists have identified a component of a genetic switch, which they call a potential 'Achilles' heel,' for a type of bacteria often associated with wounded warriors. The switch makes it possible for Acinetobacter baumannii to change between a virulent, hardy form and an avirulent form that is better at surviving at lower temperatures outside a host. Defining the switch could map out targets for new antibiotics. (2018-04-23)

Mechanism vital to keeping blood stem cells functional uncovered
Hematopoietic stem cells, that form mature blood cells, require a very precise amount of protein to function -- and defective regulation of protein production is common in certain types of aggressive human blood cancers. Now, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has uncovered a completely new mechanism that controls how proteins are produced to direct stem cell function. (2018-04-06)

Military surgeons report 'alarming frequency' of bench press injuries
A new study has found that serious chest muscle injuries are occurring with 'alarming frequency' among deployed service members who lift weights. The injuries -- tears of the pectoralis major tendon -- occurred while doing bench press weight training. The injuries then required surgical repair and six months recovery. (2018-03-22)

Imaging plays key role in evaluating injuries at Olympics
The Olympic Games give elite athletes a chance at athletic triumph, but also carry a risk of injury. When injuries occur, it is critical that they be evaluated quickly. Onsite imaging services play an important role in the management of Olympic athletes with sports-related injuries and disorders, according to a new study. (2018-02-26)

Dengue 'Achilles heel' insight offers hope for better vaccines
Researchers have new insights into how protective antibodies attack dengue viruses, which could lead to more effective dengue fever vaccines and drug therapies. The University of Queensland and China's ZhuJiang Hospital collaboratively led the study which identified an antibody that binds to, and kills, all four types of dengue virus. (2017-12-18)

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