Current Acidification News and Events

Current Acidification News and Events, Acidification News Articles.
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Turf wars: Ocean acidification and feedback loops lock in turf algal systems
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that seawater acidification locked marine communities of turf algae in a stable state, preventing the growth of kelp and coral species. The degraded turf algal systems were stabilized by feedback loops (control mechanisms in a system). This study will contribute to efforts to manage shifts from complex and diverse marine ecosystems to degraded ones, and better conserve coastal ecosystems and their contributions to human wellbeing. (2021-02-16)

High CO2 to slow tropical fish move to cooler waters
A new study from the University of Adelaide, published in Nature Climate Change, shows that the ocean acidification predicted under continuing high CO2 emissions may make cooler, temperate waters less welcoming. (2021-02-08)

Research illuminates lobsters' genetic response to changing climate
The American lobster, which supports the most valuable fishery in North America, may be more susceptible to climate change than previously thought. Studies of the early life stages of lobsters have concluded that ocean acidification, compared to warming, had limited impact on growth and metabolism. According to new research, their genes tell a different story, which could help anticipate the long-term effects of climate change for one the nation's most precious natural resources. (2021-01-28)

Fish sex organs boosted under high-CO2
Research from Australia has found that some species of fish will have higher reproductive capacity because of larger sex organs, under the more acidic oceans of the future. (2021-01-21)

Acidification impedes shell development of plankton off the US West Coast
Results from a 2016 research cruise show ocean acidification has interfered with shell development of zooplankton that are a critical part of the marine food web. (2021-01-19)

Stuck in a rut: Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a simplified state
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that ocean acidification limits algal communities to a state of low diversity and complexity. Communities grown in waters rich in carbon dioxide (CO2) were dominated by turf algae, and had low biodiversity, ecological complexity and biomass. Communities grown under acidic conditions and then transferred to waters that weren't CO2-enriched increased their biodiversity and complexity, showing that they can recover if CO2 emissions are significantly reduced. (2021-01-15)

The new face of the Antarctic
In the future, the Antarctic could become a greener place and be colonised by new species. At the same time, some species will likely disappear. (2021-01-06)

Pollutants rapidly changing the waters near Ieodo Island
Professor Kitack Lee's research team identifies the cause of ocean fertilization in northeast Asian waters. (2021-01-04)

Volcanic eruptions directly triggered ocean acidification during Early Cretaceous
New study supports hypothesis that Ontong Java Plateau large igneous province eruptions led to oceanic anoxic event 1a, 127 to 100 million years ago. (2020-12-21)

Improving multi-sectoral ocean management to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals
Researchers from IRD, the CNRS and Memorial University of Newfoundland (Canada) have assessed the capacity of the principal ocean management tools to achieve the ''Conserve and sustainably use the oceans'' sustainable development goal (SDG). (2020-12-17)

Applying compost to landfills could have environmental benefits
Many people think of composting organic matter as a way of keeping solid waste out of landfills, but a new study finds there can be significant environmental benefits associated with using compost at landfills. (2020-12-14)

Mangroves lock away carbon
Researchers uncover an overlooked process enhancing the carbon-removal potential of mangroves. (2020-12-13)

Impacts of COVID-19 emissions reductions remain murky in the oceans
While greenhouse gas emissions dropped significantly in the first half of 2020, new research finds ocean acidification remains unchanged--yet the world's oceans can respond quickly in other ways to reduced emissions. (2020-12-10)

Coasts drown as coral reefs collapse under warming and acidification
The coastal protection coral reefs currently provide will start eroding by the end of the century, as the world continues to warm and the oceans acidify. The rate of erosion of calcium carbonate on coral reefs will overtake the rate of accretion on the majority of present-day reefs by the end of the century. (2020-12-03)

Could kelp help relieve ocean acidification?
A new analysis of California's Monterey Bay evaluates kelp's potential to reduce ocean acidification, the harmful fallout from climate change on marine ecosystems and the food they produce for human populations. (2020-11-19)

Plastics and rising CO2 levels could pose combined threat to marine environment
An international team of scientists found that after three weeks of being submerged in the ocean, the bacterial diversity on plastic bottles was twice as great as on samples collected from the surrounding seawater (2020-11-06)

The future is now: long-term research shows ocean acidification ramping up on the Reef
A new study has shown ocean acidification is no longer a sombre forecast for the Great Barrier Reef but a present-day reality. The study shows seawater carbon dioxide on the Reef has risen 6 per cent in ten years, matching the rate of carbon dioxide increases in the atmosphere. (2020-10-28)

The uncertain future of the oceans
Marine food webs and biogeochemical cycles react very sensitively to the increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) - but the effects are far more complex than previously thought. This is shown in a study published by a team of researchers from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel in the journal Nature Climate Change. Data were combined from five large-scale field experiments, which investigated how the carbon cycle within plankton communities reacts to the increase of CO2. (2020-10-26)

How a greenhouse catastrophe killed nearly all life
252 million years ago at the boundary between the Permian and Triassic epochs, Earth witnessed a mass extinction event that extinguished about three-quarters of all species on land and some 95 percent of all species in the ocean. Volcanic activity in today's Siberia has long been debated as a likely trigger of this event. Now, an international team of researchers provides for the first time a conclusive reconstruction of the key events that led to the mega-catastrophe. (2020-10-19)

Long-term data show a recent acceleration in chemical and physical changes in the ocean
New research published in Nature Communications Earth & Environment uses data from two sustained open-ocean hydrographic stations (Hydrostation 'S' and the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study) in the North Atlantic Ocean near Bermuda to demonstrate recent changes in ocean physics and chemistry since the 1980s. The study shows decadal variability and recent acceleration of surface warming, salinification, deoxygenation, and changes in carbon dioxide (CO2)-carbonate chemistry that drives ocean acidification. (2020-10-16)

Human activity has made Murray estuary more vulnerable to drought
In drought prone Australia, it's largest river, the Murray is known to suffer acidification in its estuary in South Australia. For the first time a study has married geomorphology and environmental chemistry to gain a better understanding of how the lakes formed - and how they should be managed. (2020-10-14)

Droughts are threatening global wetlands: new study
University of Adelaide scientists have shown how droughts are threatening the health of wetlands globally. Published in the journal Earth-Science Reviews, the scientists highlight the many physical and chemical changes occurring during droughts that lead to severe, and sometimes irreversible, drying of wetland soils. (2020-10-09)

Future ocean conditions could cause significant physical changes in marine mussels
Scientists from the University of Plymouth showed increased temperature and acidification of our oceans over the next century could have a range of effects on an economically important marine species (2020-10-09)

For red abalone, resisting ocean acidification starts with mom
Red abalone mothers from California's North Coast give their offspring an energy boost when they're born that helps them better withstand ocean acidification compared to their captive, farmed counterparts, according to a study from the Bodega Marine Laboratory at the University of California, Davis. (2020-10-05)

Climate change responsible for record sea temperature levels, says study
Global warming is driving an unprecedented rise in sea temperatures including in the Mediterranean, according to a major new report published by the peer-reviewed Journal of Operational Oceanography. (2020-10-02)

Ocean warming and acidification effects on calcareous phytoplankton communities
A new study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that the negative effects of rapid ocean warming on planktonic communities will be exacerbated by ocean acidification. (2020-09-30)

Planktonic sea snails and slugs may be more adaptable to ocean acidification than expected
Pteropods, or ''wing-footed'' sea snails and slugs, may be more resilient to acidic oceans than previously thought, scientists report. By digging into their evolutionary history, the research team found that pteropods are much older than expected and survived past crises when the oceans became warmer and more acidic. Their findings are a surprising turn of events, as these beautiful and enigmatic marine creatures are currently one of the most adversely affected by ocean acidification. (2020-09-30)

Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Feeding rates of blue mussels slow down under ocean acidification conditions, and the cause may be the slowing beat of gill cilia, similar to a known response in human lung cells. (2020-09-29)

Sentinels of ocean acidification impacts survived Earth's last mass extinction
Two groups of tiny, delicate marine organisms, sea butterflies and sea angels, were found to be surprisingly resilient--having survived dramatic global climate change and Earth's most recent mass extinction event 66 million years ago, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2020-09-28)

Ocean acidification puts deep-sea coral reefs at risk of collapse
Deep-sea coral reefs face challenges as changes to ocean chemistry triggered by climate change may cause their foundations to become brittle, a study suggests. (2020-09-17)

In the absence of otters, climate warming leads to Aleutian Reef decline
Sea otters prey on urchins and keep their population in check. When otters disappear, urchin populations explode, leading to overgrazing on kelp and a decline in kelp forests. (2020-09-10)

Great Barrier Reef 'glue' at risk from ocean acidification
Scientists have suspected that increasing ocean acidity would weaken and thin the structures underpinning tropical reefs. Now they have irrefutable evidence dating back 30,000 years. (2020-09-02)

Ocean acidification causing coral 'osteoporosis' on iconic reefs
Scientists have long suspected that ocean acidification is affecting corals' ability to build their skeletons, but it has been challenging to isolate its effect from that of simultaneous warming ocean temperatures, which also influence coral growth. New research from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) reveals the distinct impact that ocean acidification is having on coral growth on some of the world's iconic reefs. (2020-08-27)

Effects of nutrient pollution in marine ecosystems are compounded by human activity
Nutrient pollution in the oceans caused by human activity can significantly impact marine life. The process results in an explosion of plant and algal life in the sea that disrupts delicate marine ecosystems and destroys marine habitats. However, a new review highlights that the problem can be exacerbated by other human actions, such as climate change. The article proposes an integrated solution that involves ecosystem management and includes practical steps to reduce nutrient pollution. (2020-08-17)

More carbon in the ocean can lead to smaller fish
As humans continue to send large quantities of carbon into the atmosphere, much of that carbon is absorbed by the ocean, and UConn researchers have found high CO2 concentrations in water can make fish grow smaller. (2020-08-04)

UM researcher helps reveal changes in water of Canadian arctic
Melting of Arctic ice due to climate change has exposed more sea surface to an atmosphere with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide. Scientists have long suspected this trend would raise CO2 in Arctic Ocean water. Now University of Montana researcher Michael DeGrandpre and his patented sensors have helped an international team determine that, indeed, CO2 levels are rising in water across wide swaths of the Arctic Ocean's Canada Basin. (2020-06-24)

Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected
Arctic Ocean acidification worse than previously expected. (2020-06-17)

Protecting bays from ocean acidification
As oceans absorb more man-made carbon dioxide from the air, a process of ocean acidification occurs that can have a negative impact on marine life. But coastal waterways, such as Chesapeake Bay, can also suffer from low oxygen and acidification. New research from the University of Delaware identifies one way to protect these waterways -- the presence of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV). (2020-06-12)

Climate change an imminent threat to glass sponge reefs
Warming ocean temperatures and acidification drastically reduce the skeletal strength and filter-feeding capacity of glass sponges, according to new UBC research. The findings, published in Scientific Reports, indicate that ongoing climate change could have serious, irreversible impacts on the sprawling glass sponge reefs of the Pacific Northwest and associated biodiversity -- the only known reefs of their kind in the world. (2020-06-01)

The consequences of exploiting the ocean depths
A group of international experts has just published an article in the prestigious review Nature in which they suggest responses to question such as how organisms live in the Twilight zone and how diverse they are; which organic processes transform and consume the zone's organic material; and how the organic material is carried into and out of it (2020-06-01)

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