Current Acknowledged News and Events

Current Acknowledged News and Events, Acknowledged News Articles.
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Pregnant questions
Asking the right questions leads to a more accurate assessment of prenatal alcohol use in pregnant women. (2021-02-03)

WHO Guideline Development Group advises against use of remdesivir for covid-19
The antiviral drug remdesivir is not suggested for patients admitted to hospital with covid-19, regardless of how severely ill they are, because there is currently no evidence that it improves survival or the need for ventilation, say a WHO Guideline Development Group (GDG) panel of international experts in The BMJ today. (2020-11-19)

When kids watch a lot of TV, parents may end up more stressed
The more TV kids watch, the more ads they see and the more likely they are to ask for things on shopping trips. That may contribute to parents' overall stress levels, researchers found. (2020-11-10)

COVID-19: Call for millions spent on failing system to be diverted to local services
A group of doctors is calling on the government to divert the hundreds of millions of pounds being spent on the failing centralised privatised COVID-19 national test and trace service into local primary care, local NHS labs and local public health services. (2020-10-27)

UBC research identifies gaps in helping youth diagnosed with early stages of psychosis
New UBC research is highlighting the need for improved training when it comes to helping young people living with psychosis determine their sense of identity. (2020-10-14)

The development of climate security discourse in Japan
This research traced discourses related to climate security in Japan to determine why so little exists in Japan and whether or not such discourse could suggest new areas for consideration to more comprehensively respond to the climate change problem. Based on categorization of various approaches by climate security-related literature outside Japan, the study revealed areas where Japan has been able to respond to, and other areas where almost no discussion is being made in Japan. (2020-10-01)

Criticism of COVID-19 models by democratic political leaders may erode public trust in science
Criticisms of COVID-19 models by Democratic elites in May 2020 appeared to undermine public support for the models' use - and trust in science more broadly -- according to a series of survey experiments conducted with the participation of more than 6,000 Americans. (2020-09-25)

How global responses to COVID-19 threaten global food security
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has forced nations worldwide to implement unprecedented social measures to stem the rapid spread of the virus. (2020-07-30)

COVID-19: Are we handling this the right way?
COVID-19: Herd Immunity needs to be considered. (2020-06-08)

HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus collectively through the nuclear endocytosis-like pathway
How HIV-1 viral cores enter the nucleus through the undersized nuclear pore remains mysterious. By multi labelling of viral and cellular components and dynamically tracking, researchers observed that HIV-1 selectively gathered at the microtubule organization center, leading the nearby nuclear envelope to undergo deformation, invagination and restoration to form a nuclear vesicle in which the viral particles were wrapped; then, the inner membrane of the nuclear vesicle ruptured to release HIV-1 viral cores into the nucleus. (2020-06-01)

Patients prefer their consent to share their data and to manage it digitally
Patients with diabetes often have to see many different stakeholders who each specialize in different aspects of their treatment. Researchers from WMG, University of Warwick surveyed patients on their understanding of how their data was shared, and found they would prefer to have it shared digitally using the Dovetail Digital consent application. (2020-05-14)

Child's play 'lost' in pandemic fear
Social and community disruptions caused by the COVID-19 restrictions could have a lasting effect on child wellbeing, Flinders University researchers warn. While health, safety and education responses are the focus of restrictions, the needs of childhood independence, self-determination and play are less acknowledged, Flinders University experts explain in a new publication. (2020-05-12)

Ecotourism transforms attitudes to marine conservation
A study has shown how ecotourism in the Philippines has transformed people's attitudes towards marine conservation. (2020-05-04)

PTSD partners feel invisible, study finds
Recognition of the needs of wives and intimate partners in supporting the recovery of veterans and front-line emergency workers affected by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been highlighted in a new study led by Flinders University. Their contribution to trauma recovery, and their own need for support, are not well understood by military and emergency service organisations, healthcare providers and government, the researchers found when they interviewed 22 partners of Australian veterans, paramedics, fire and police officers (2020-04-23)

Drug overcomes chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer
In an international preclinical study, researchers found they could overcome chemotherapy resistance in clear cell ovarian cancer cell models using low doses of the drug 2-deoxy-D-glucose. The researchers will now look to trial the drug in patients. (2020-04-16)

New study identifies Neanderthal ancestry in African populations and describes its origin
After sequencing the Neanderthal genome, scientists discovered all present day non-African individuals carry some Neanderthal ancestry in their DNA. Now, researchers at Princeton University present evidence of Neanderthal ancestry in African populations too, and its origin provides new insights into human history. (2020-01-30)

Transformative 3D printing approach established from insight into developmental biology
Engineers need to get more creative in their approach to design and additive manufacturing (AM) systems, by taking inspiration from the way humans grow and develop, say researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2020-01-10)

Ants fight plant diseases
New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. The small insects secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of different diseases and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases. (2019-10-17)

Communicating uncertainty about climate change
The ways climate scientists explain their predictions about the impact of global warming can either promote or limit their persuasiveness. (2019-10-17)

New research reveals soil microbes play a key role in plant disease resistance
Scientists have discovered that soil microbes can make plants more resistant to an aggressive disease -- opening new possibilities for sustainable food production. (2019-09-25)

97% of footballers in the Spanish League unaware of banned substances
A study conducted by researchers from the University of Granada has also found that 95% of footballers do not even know what this agency is for. The researchers analysed a sample of 1,324 footballers from 88 different teams, including 304 players from the Professional Football League. (2019-09-06)

Storytelling bots learn to punch up their last lines
Nothing disappoints quite like a good story with a lousy finish. So researchers at Carnegie Mellon University who work in the young field of automated storytelling don't think they're getting ahead of themselves by devising better endings. (2019-08-01)

Aspirin improves liver function after embolization of hepatocellular carcinoma
Aspirin therapy is associated with both improved liver function test results and survival after transarterial embolization for hepatocellular carcinoma, according to an ahead-of-print article by F. Edward Boas of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer published in the September 2019 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR). (2019-07-31)

Music develops the spoken language of the hearing-impaired
Finnish researchers have compiled guidelines for international use for utilising music to support the development of spoken language. The guidelines are suitable for the parents of children with hearing impairments, early childhood education providers, teachers, speech therapists and other rehabilitators of children with hearing disabilities, as well as the hearing-impaired themselves. (2019-06-27)

Relay station in the brain controls our movements
The relay station of the brain, the substantia nigra consists of different types of nerve cells and is responsible for controlling the execution of diverse movements. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now characterized two of these cell populations more precisely and has been able to assign an exact function to each of them. The results of the study have now been published in Cell Reports. (2019-05-14)

Hunting jeopardizes forest carbon storage, yet is overlooked in climate mitigation efforts
The loss of animals, often due to unregulated or illegal hunting, has consequences for the carbon storage capacity of forests, yet this link is rarely mentioned in high-level climate policy discussions, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden and the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. (2019-05-06)

UC research supports state's effort to raise age limit on tobacco purchases
Merianos' research on the effects of secondhand and thirdhand smoke on teen health has garnered attention from around the world, and more recently her research on the means of acquiring e-cigarettes among adolescents earned her an award from the American Academy of Health Behavior. She presented what she describes as ''part two'' of that research this week at the Pediatric Academic Societies conference, this time focusing on flavors and brands. (2019-05-01)

Are healthcare providers 'second victims' of medical errors?
Four women with family members who died as a result of preventable medical error penned an editorial for The BMJ urging abandonment of the term 'second victims' to describe healthcare providers who commit errors. (2019-04-02)

Exercise can improve non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease
Exercise has potential to improve non-motor as well as motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), including cognitive function, report investigators in a review published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease. (2019-03-04)

Patient engagement as a new blockbuster drug, not quite yet, study finds
A team of researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Berkeley School of Public Health at UC Berkeley recently conducted a study designed to better understand how patient engagement and activation (PAE) practices are being integrated into clinical practice. What they found was a great deal of positive sentiment about PAE among the healthcare professionals surveyed, but much less understanding and implementation of PAE tools and approaches. (2018-11-14)

Sharing parenting leads to healthier young, beetle study finds
Animals who share the burden of raising young tend to have healthier offspring than animals who do so alone (2018-08-01)

When oil and water mix
Hydraulic fracturing of organic-rich shales has become a major industry. The commonly used term for this extraction of hydrocarbons -- fracking -- is especially intriguing. Not only does it convey the process of breaking apart rocks, but the dividing of public opinion. Fracking is simultaneously hyped as a boon to the economy and a disaster to the environment. (2018-07-03)

Scale is a key ingredient when tracking biodiversity, researchers say
To fully understand biodiversity and how it is changing, you need to look near, far, and in-between, according to a new study. Researchers at Yale University studied 50 years of data about nesting birds in North America and tracked biodiversity changes on a local, regional, and continental scale. They found significant differences in how much change had occurred, based upon how wide a geographic net they cast. (2018-07-02)

Women TEDx speakers receive more polarized comments than men
BYU researchers found that though most comments on TEDx and TED-Ed videos are neutral, women receive more of both positive and negative comments than men. (2018-06-26)

UK urgently needs a joined up approach to recruitment of international doctors
The UK urgently needs a joined up and strategic approach to the recruitment of international health professionals, argue experts in The BMJ today. (2018-06-13)

A bioengineered tattoo monitors blood calcium levels
Scientists have created a biomedical tattoo that becomes visible on the skin of mice in response to elevated levels of calcium in the blood. (2018-04-18)

Diverse metals mix it up in novel nanoparticles
Researchers have learned to combine up to eight different metals in a single tiny, uniformly mixed nanoparticle. (2018-04-04)

Study uncovers the intricacies of the pursuit of higher self-control
Self-control is a central human capacity associated with a wide range of personal and societal advantages. In view of its benefits, increasing self-control among children and adults has been advocated as a remedy to many of society's ailments, from childhood obesity to adulthood criminal behavior. Although widely considered highly beneficial, a recent review uncovers some disadvantages to high self-control. (2018-03-26)

Which piece resembles your color perception for #theDress image?
A novel algorithm to simulate the color appearance of objects under chromatic illuminants has been proposed by Ichiro Kuriki of Tohoku University. (2018-03-22)

Large numbers of students skipping breakfast
Despite widespread availability of morning meal programs, a large number of Canadian students are still skipping breakfast, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-03-14)

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