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Current Acl Reconstruction News and Events, Acl Reconstruction News Articles.
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Human growth hormone treatment after ACL injury may prevent loss of muscle strength
A new study finds the use of HGH treatment in patients that have undergone ACL reconstructive surgery may prevent the loss of muscle strength and weakness. (2020-05-27)

A thin lensless camera free of noise
Scientists from Tsinghua University in China and MIT in the US report that applying a compressive sensing algorithm can significantly improve the quality of lensless imaging. Their thin lensless camera consists of a Fresnel optical element placed three millimeters in front of a CMOS image sensor. The signal recorded by the CMOS sensor is then reconstructed by the advanced algorithm to generate an improved image of the object free of noise. (2020-05-26)

Laser-based technique captures 3D images of impressionist-style brushstrokes
Researchers have developed a new strategy that uses optical coherence tomography (OCT) to acquire both the surface and underlying details of impressionist style oil paintings. This information can be used to create detailed 3D reconstructions to enhance the viewing experience and offer a way for the visually impaired to experience paintings. (2020-05-20)

Unlocking the gate to the millisecond CT
Researchers have developed a new multi-beam method for conducting CT scans that improve image quality whilst drastically cutting the required time to one millisecond. (2020-05-14)

New hope for ACL injuries: Adding eccentric exercises could improve physical therapy outcomes
People with anterior cruciate ligament injuries can lose up to 40% of the muscle strength in the affected leg--with muscle atrophy remaining a big problem even after ACL reconstruction and physical therapy. (2020-05-13)

AI techniques in medical imaging may lead to incorrect diagnoses
Machine learning and AI are highly unstable in medical image reconstruction, and may lead to false positives and false negatives, a new study suggests. (2020-05-12)

Strenuous exercise safe for people at high risk of knee arthritis
People at high risk for knee osteoarthritis (OA) may be reluctant to participate in strenuous physical activities such as jogging, cycling, singles tennis and skiing. But a new study that followed high-risk individuals for 10 years showed vigorous exercise did not increase their risk of developing OA and may even protect them from it. (2020-05-04)

Astronomers capture rare images of planet-forming disks around stars
An international team of astronomers has captured fifteen images of the inner rims of planet-forming disks located hundreds of light years away. These disks of dust and gas, similar in shape to a music record, form around young stars. The images shed new light on how planetary systems are formed. (2020-04-30)

Insight into the synapses
'Distance keeping' is not exactly the motto of the glutamate receptors: Using super-resolution microscopy, it now was discovered that the receptors usually appear in small groups at the synapses and are in contact with other proteins. (2020-04-16)

Researchers develop synthetic scaffolds to heal injured tendons and ligaments
Top biomedical engineering researcher develops synthetic scaffolds for tendon and ligament regeneration. Previous synthetic tendon grafts have led to poor outcomes and implant rejection. Australia has one of the highest rates of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries in the world -- and up to 25 percent of surgeries require revision. (2020-04-14)

Observing the internal 3D structure of the nipple to understand and fight breast cancer
Researchers from Nagoya University, led by Assoc. Prof. Naoki Sunaguchi, employed X-ray dark-field computed tomography to create three-dimensional renderings of the internal structure of the human nipple, thereby elucidating its varied arrangements. Their approach could be applied for diagnostic and exploratory purposes in breast cancer. (2020-04-08)

3D reconstructions of individual nanoparticles
Want to find out how to design and build materials atom by atom? Check this liquid phase electron microscopy that will advance full control of nanoengineering. (2020-04-02)

Smartphone videos produce highly realistic 3D face reconstructions
Normally, it takes pricey equipment and expertise to create an accurate 3D reconstruction of someone's face. Now, Carnegie Mellon University researchers have pulled off the feat using video recorded on an ordinary smartphone. Shooting a continuous video of the front and sides of the face generates a dense cloud of data. A two-step process developed by CMU's Robotics Institute uses that data, with some help from deep learning algorithms, to build a digital reconstruction of the face. (2020-04-01)

Quantitative reconstruction of formation paleo-pressure and case studies
As the paleo-pressure is significant for hydrocarbon accumulation and reservoir formation, geologists are eager for an accurate reconstruction of paleo-pressure, although that is very hard. Now a new research carried out quantitative single factor analysis on overpressure mechanisms, and reconstructed pressure evolutions of representative hydrocarbon reservoirs from western China as examples, using multiple methods combined with the geological settings. (2020-04-01)

APS tip sheet: Untangling neurons with scattered light
New analysis examines light scattering properties in brain tissue to better understand the three-dimensional structure of nerve fibers. (2020-03-30)

New findings from the Neotropics suggest contraction of the ITCZ
Research by an international team of scientists led by University of New Mexico Professor Yemane Asmerom suggests contraction of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) during a warming Earth, leading in turn to drying of the Neotropics, including Central America, and aggravating current trends of social unrest and mass migration. (2020-02-14)

Machine learning implemented for quantum optics by Skoltech scientists
As machine learning continues to surpass human performance in a growing number of tasks, scientists at Skoltech have applied deep learning to reconstruct quantum properties of optical systems. (2020-02-12)

Building a better breast
Surgeons at UT Southwestern have developed a process to determine the best approach for single breast reconstruction. (2020-02-04)

More than a knee injury: ACL tears cause harmful changes in our brain structure
It's known that some joint function is often permanently lost after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and re-injury is common even with intensive physical therapy, but it's unclear why. (2020-01-28)

Look what's inside: Full-body movies from EXPLORER scanner
Positron Emission Tomography, or PET scanning, a technique for tracing metabolic processes in the body, has been widely applied in clinical diagnosis and research spanning physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology. Now researchers at UC Davis and Fudan University, Shanghai have shown how to use an advanced reconstruction method with an ultrasensitive total-body PET scanner to capture real-time videos of blood flow and heart function. (2020-01-20)

Widespread droughts affect southern California water sources six times a century
A University of Arizona-led study used the annual growth rings of trees to reconstruct a long-term climate history and examine the duration and frequency of ''perfect droughts'' in Southern California's main water sources. (2020-01-13)

Study finds 95 percent satisfaction rate with Mohs surgery
Patients who received Mohs surgery to treat the most serious form of skin cancer, melanoma, reported a 95 percent long-term satisfaction rate with their results, according to a new study by UT Southwestern Medical Center dermatologists. (2020-01-10)

Chinese team makes nanoscopy breakthrough
A Chinese research team has developed an advanced imaging technique to achieve super-resolution microscopy at unprecedented speeds and with many fewer images. The new method should make it possible to capture processes in living cells at speeds not previously possible. (2019-12-12)

3D model of human liver for better diagnosis
Dresden researchers create liver model for improved diagnosis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. (2019-12-04)

Building a better breast with eye-tracking technology
What makes the female breast attractive? The answer is subjective, of course. But studies using eye-tracking technology are providing a more objective basis for determining which breast areas are most attractive -- which may help to improve the outcomes of surgery, reports the December issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. (2019-12-03)

Virtual reality becomes more real
Scientists from Skoltech ADASE (Advanced Data Analytics in Science and Engineering) lab have found a way to enhance depth map resolution, which should make virtual reality and computer graphics more realistic. They presented their research results at the prestigious International Conference on Computer Vision 2019 in Korea. (2019-11-28)

Dinosaur skull turns paleontology assumptions on their head
A team of researchers at the University of Alberta has unearthed a well-preserved Styracosaurus skull -- and its facial imperfections have implications for how paleontologists identify new species of dinosaurs. Nicknamed Hannah, the dinosaur was a Styracosaurus -- a horned dinosaur over five metres in length with a fan of long horns. UAlberta paleontologists have learned much from those horns -- because they aren't symmetrical. (2019-11-25)

Study examines Appalachian Kentucky's breast cancer care disparities
Despite the benefits of breast reconstruction, women from Appalachia are less likely to have the surgery than non-Appalachian Kentuckians, according to a new study by the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center. (2019-11-20)

A new facial analysis method detects genetic syndromes with high precision and specificity
Developed by Araceli Morales, Gemma Piella and Federico Sukno, members of the Department of Information and Communication Technologies, together with researchers from the University of Washington, which they present in a feature in the advanced online edition of Lecture Notes in Computer Science of Oct. 7. (2019-11-13)

Deep inside the brain: Unraveling the dense networks in the cerebral cortex
Mammalian brains, with their unmatched number of nerve cells and density of communication, are the most complex networks known. While methods to analyze neuronal networks sparsely have been available for decades, the dense mapping of neuronal circuits is a major scientific challenge. Researchers from the MPI for Brain Research have now succeeded in the dense connectomic mapping of brain tissue from the cerebral cortex, and quantify the possible imprint of learning in the circuit. (2019-10-24)

360 degree virtual dive in Iceland shipwreck
October 16, 2019 marks 360 years since the Dutch merchant ship Melckmeyt (Milkmaid) was wrecked off a remote Icelandic island. Digital archaeology specialists have created a spectacular 360 degree virtual dive on the wreck to mark the anniversary. (2019-10-22)

Why modified carbon nanotubes can help the reproducibility problem
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) conducted an in-depth study on how carbon nanotubes with oxygen-containing groups can be used to greatly enhance the performance of perovskite solar cells. The newly discovered self-recrystallization ability of perovskite could lead to improvement of low-cost and efficient perovskite solar cells. (2019-10-18)

A new approach to reconstructing protein evolution
One angle scientists have taken to explore how protein functions arise is to trace family evolution and relatedness, which is difficult. In eLife, Roman Sloutsky of UMass Amherst and his former advisor Kristen Naegle, now at UVA, propose an unusual, new and more accurate way to trace how proteins diverged over time. ''It can yield powerful insights into the relationship between protein sequence, structure and function for that family,'' he says. (2019-10-17)

For young athletes, sport specialization means increased risk of injury
Specialization in a chosen sport is associated with a higher volume of activity -- and it could increase young athletes' risk of sustaining both traumatic- and overuse-based injuries, new study says. (2019-09-23)

What color were fossil animals?
Dr. Michael Pittman of the Vertebrate Palaeontology Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Hong Kong led an international study with his PhD student Mr. Arindam Roy that evaluates fossil color reconstruction methods to propose a new study framework that improves and expands current practice. The paper was recently published in the journal Biological Reviews. (2019-09-23)

Studying drivers behind cardiac arrhythmias
Despite advances in medical imaging, the mechanisms leading to the irregular contractions of the heart during rhythm disorders remain poorly understood. Research suggests existing data from ultrasound imaging can be used to work backwards to reconstruct underlying electrical causes of arrhythmias. (2019-09-17)

Computational approach speeds up advanced microscopy imaging
Researchers have developed a way to enhance the imaging speed of two-photon microscopy up to 5 times without compromising resolution. This record-fast imaging speed will allow scientists to observe biological phenomena that were previously too fleeting to image with current state-of-the-art advanced microscopy. (2019-08-27)

Biomolecular analyses of Roopkund skeletons show Mediterranean migrants in Indian Himalaya
A large-scale study conducted by an international team of scientists has revealed that the mysterious skeletons of Roopkund Lake -- once thought to have died during a single catastrophic event - belong to genetically highly distinct groups that died in multiple periods in at least two episodes separated by one thousand years. The study, published this week in Nature Communications, involved an international team of 28 researchers from institutions in India, the United States and Europe. (2019-08-20)

Reconstructing histological slices into 3D images
Despite advances in 3D imaging such as MRI and CT, scientists still rely on slicing a specimen into 2D sections to acquire the most detailed information. Using this information, they then try to reconstruct a 3D image of the specimen. Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology report a new algorithm that can do this task at less cost and higher robustness than standard methods. (2019-08-06)

New study identifies causes of multidecadal climate changes
A new reconstruction of global average surface temperature change over the past 2,000 years has identified the main causes for decade-scale climate changes. The new temperature reconstruction also largely agrees with climate model simulations of the same time period. This suggests that current climate models accurately represent the contributions of various influences on global climate change -- and are capable of correctly predicting future climate warming. (2019-07-24)

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