Current Acoustics News and Events

Current Acoustics News and Events, Acoustics News Articles.
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Human-generated noise pollution dominates the ocean's soundscape
The soundscapes of the Anthropocene ocean are fundamentally different from those of pre-industrial times, becoming more and more a raucous cacophony as the noise from human activity has grown louder and more prevalent. (2021-02-04)

Crunch! Underwater acoustics expose 'shell-crushing' sounds in a large marine predator
''Shell-crushing,'' an explosive sound, occurs when marine animals crack open hard shells like clams to eat the edible tissue. There hasn't been any data to support this feeding noise, until now. A study is first to quantify these sounds using underwater acoustics in a marine animal in a controlled setting. Scientists know what type of shell a ray is eating based on the sound it makes and show it's audible above ambient noise in lagoons out to 100 meters. (2021-01-26)

Sounds, smells could sway our self-image
A lemony scent and light sounds could change the way you feel about yourself. Previously, researchers have shown that visual and tactile stimulation can change a person's perception of their own body weight. Research being presented by Giada Brianza at the 179th ASA Meeting, has found our hearing and sense of smell can also change how we feel about our self-image, which could help improve healthy behaviors. (2020-12-11)

A day at the beach helps model how sound moves through coastal areas
At a North Carolina beach, researchers have been poking and prodding the sand to study how moisture levels affect sounds as they move across the environment. Over short distances, even moderately wet sand reflects sound more like water does than as a solid surface does. Faith Cobb and her team are looking into if the same is true for long-range sound propagation. Their findings will be presented as a part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-10)

Lung ultrasounds could help determine COVID-19 outcome
Researchers have developed a method using ultrasound imaging to score a patient's lung health, which may help predict if a patient with COVID-19 will worsen. Using 14 points in the lungs, they looked for abnormalities and assigned each spot a score out of 3 based on its severity. Adding up all the points, the researchers found the total lung ultrasound score was higher for those who had a worsening outcome of COVID-19. (2020-12-10)

How loud is too loud? Identifying noise levels that deter older restaurant patrons
As restaurants get noisier, the increasing noise levels could deter older patrons, especially those with mild to severe hearing loss. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will discuss their work on investigating acceptable noise levels that won't cause restaurant visitors to stay away from certain establishments. Identifying acceptable noise levels helps establish truly ''age-friendly'' communities. The session will take place as part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-10)

Hearing tones, elements through atomic music
With each atom assigned a tonal signature based on its spectral signature, music can be a powerful tool for helping students understand atomic structure. Jill Linz is working toward synthesizing unique tones for each element to create an acoustic version of the periodic table. She will discuss her progress and the potential applications of the project at the 179th ASA Meeting, Dec. 7-10. (2020-12-10)

How much does the way you speak reveal about you?
Listeners can extract a lot of information about a person from their acoustic speech signal. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Dec. 7-10, Tessa Bent, Emerson Wolff, and Jennifer Lentz will describe their study in which listeners were told to categorize 144 unique audio clips of monolingual English talkers into Midland, New York City, and Southern U.S. dialect regions, and Asian American, Black/African American, or white speakers. (2020-12-10)

How does eye position affect 'cocktail party' listening?
Several acoustic studies have shown that the position of your eyes determines where your visual spatial attention is directed, which automatically influences your auditory spatial attention. Researchers are currently exploring its impact on speech intelligibility. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Virginia Best will describe her work to determine whether there is a measurable effect of eye position within cocktail party listening situations. (2020-12-09)

Noninvasive way to explore traumatic brain injuries
A noninvasive method to measure the stiffness parameters along fibrous pathways within the brain is helping researchers explore traumatic brain injuries. The stiffness of these tissues can reveal clues about changes and pathologies within the brain's gray and white matter. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Anthony J. Romano will describe the method known as waveguide elastography. Waveguide elastography merges magnetic resonance elastography and diffusion tensor imaging with a combination of isotropic and anisotropic inversion algorithms. (2020-12-09)

Accent perception depends on backgrounds of speaker, listener
Visual cues can change listeners' perception of others' accents, and people's past exposure to varied speech can also impact their perception of accents. Ethan Kutlu will discuss his team's work testing the impact that visual input and linguistic diversity has on listeners' perceived accentedness judgments in two different locations: Gainesville, Florida, and Montreal, Canada. The session will take place Dec. 9 as part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-09)

Delivering sound to people where they want it for VR, AR
What if a commercial audio speaker could function like an autozoom projector does for light, and you could deliver the sound people want where they want it? Chinmay Rajguru, from the University of Sussex, will discuss his research team's work creating a sound projector that can deliver spatial sound at a distance by forming a beam of audible sound at the 179th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Dec. 7-10, 2020. (2020-12-08)

Smarter traffic signs ahead?
Researchers in Poland have created smart road signs that use built-in Doppler radar, video, and acoustic radar and weather stations to monitor road traffic and conditions to warn drivers in real-time of hazards and prevent collisions on highways. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Dec. 7-10, Andrzej Czyzewski will describe his applied research project to develop autonomous road signs with built-in acoustic radar devices. (2020-12-07)

Imitation mosquito ears help identify mosquito species and sex
Using an imitation ''ear'' modeled on the organs that mosquitos use to hear, researchers have identified a mosquito's species and sex using sound -- just like mosquitos do themselves. The researchers hope this bioinspired detector could someday be used in the field to save lives by aiding in more selective pesticide use and possibly preventing mosquitos from mating. A presentation of the new research will be given as part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-07)

Outside Oz, GLINDA reports on tornado acoustics
During tornado formation, sound waves are produced at very low frequencies. And if your name is GLINDA, you do not need to be in Oz to hear them. Brandon White, at Oklahoma State University, is part of an engineering team that developed the Ground-based Local Infrasound Data Acquisition (GLINDA) system for the acoustic measurement of weather phenomena. He will discuss its design and capabilities at the 179th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America. (2020-12-07)

Characterising complex flows in 2D bubble swarms
Research published in EPJ E shows that in 2D simulated fluids, upward-flowing swarms of bubbles, a mathematical relationship describing the nature of flows in their wake, previously thought to be universal, actually changes within larger-scale flows in less viscous fluids. (2020-12-04)

Army computer models unveil secret to quieter small drones
It's no secret the US Army wants its small unmanned aerial systems to operate quietly in densely-populated regions, but tests to achieve this can be expensive, time-consuming and labor-intensive according to researchers. (2020-12-03)

Headset over earphone: Cancelling out unnecessary and unwanted noise
Researchers from the Centre for Audio, Acoustics and Vibration at the University of Technology Sydney impacts for health and well-being of their 'virtual Active Noise Control/Cancellation (ANC) headphone (2020-11-29)

Moths strike out in evolutionary arms race with sophisticated wing design
Ultra-thin, super-absorbent and extraordinarily designed to detract attention, the wings of moths could hold the key for developing technological solutions to survive in a noisy world. (2020-11-23)

Children misdiagnosed with "impairment of language acquisition"
Around 45% of children in Austrian day nurseries have a first language other than German. Those who our experiencing difficulty in learning the second language are often diagnosed as having a suspected ''impairment of language acquisition''. In fact, this often merely reflects the fact that they have not yet fully acquired the second language. (2020-11-16)

Minor fluctuations in sound make it hard to identify in which concert hall music is played
The volume and timbre of music have a significant impact on how people perceive the acoustics in a concert hall, according to two recent studies carried out by the research group of Aalto University Professor Tapio Lokki. Both have been published in the Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, one of the most prestigious journals in its field. (2020-11-05)

The rhythm of change: What a drum-beat experiment reveals about cultural evolution
Living organisms aren't the only things that evolve over time. Cultural practices change, too, and in recent years social scientists have taken a keen interest in understanding this cultural evolution. A new experiment used drum-beats to investigate the role that environment plays on cultural shifts, confirming that different environments do indeed give rise to different cultural patterns. (2020-10-27)

Noise can put you off your food
Noise can make or break a dining experience, according to a laboratory study replicating common noise levels in restaurants. The acoustic experts say the study proves that high noise levels can play a major part in a dining experience - along with the quality of the food and restaurant service. (2020-09-29)

Vessel noise present year-round at Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary
The environment in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of San Francisco is not a refuge from the noise generated by ship traffic, the first underwater marine acoustic study of the region has shown. (2020-09-29)

Photonic amorphous topological insulator
The current understanding of topological insulators and their classical wave analogues, such as photonic topological insulators, is mainly based on topological band theory. Contrarily, Scientists in China and Singapore experimentally showed photonic topological insulators based on glass-like amorphous phases, for which the bandstructure is ill-defined. The persistence of topological protection is also found closely related to the glass-to-liquid transition. This interplay between topology and amorphousness paves the way for new classes of non-crystalline topological photonic bandgap materials. (2020-07-27)

Topological photonics in fractal lattices
Photonic topological insulators are currently a subject of great interest because of the features: insulating bulk and topological edge states. Now, scientists from Technion in Israel found theoretically that photonic topological insulators can exist in fractal lattices, comprising only edges - with no bulk at all. Their results offer a realizable experimental platform to study topological fractals and provide new directions for exploring topological physics. (2020-07-21)

Physicists find ways to control gamma radiation
Researchers from Kazan Federal University, Texas A&M University and Institute of Applied Physics (Russian Academy of Sciences) found ways to direct high frequency gamma radiation by means of acoustics. (2020-07-21)

Animals who try to sound 'bigger' are good at learning sounds
Some animals fake their body size by sounding 'bigger' than they actually are. Maxime Garcia from the University of Zurich and Andrea Ravignani from the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics studied 164 different mammals and found that animals who lower their voice to sound bigger are often skilled vocalists. Both strategies--sounding bigger and learning sounds--are likely driven by sexual selection, and may play a role in explaining the origins of human speech evolution. (2020-07-08)

The human brain tracks speech more closely in time than other sounds
The way that speech processing differs from the processing of other sounds has long been a major open question in human neuroscience. Researchers at Aalto University have endeavored to answer this by investigating brain representations for natural spoken words using machine learning models and comparing them with representations of environmental sounds that refer to the same concepts - such as the word cat and a cat meowing. (2020-06-22)

Acoustics put a fresh spin on electron transitions
Electrons are very much at the mercy of magnetic fields, which scientists can manipulate to control the electrons and their angular momentum -- i.e. their 'spin.' (2020-06-10)

'Whispering gallery' effect controls electron beams with light
When you speak softly in one of the galleries of St Paul's cathedral, the sound runs around the dome and visitors anywhere on its circumference can hear it. This striking phenomenon has been termed the 'whispering gallery' effect, and one variant is where a wave travels nearly perfectly around a structure. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now harnessed the effect to control the beam of an electron microscope by light. Results appeared in Nature. (2020-06-05)

SUTD scientists led development of novel acoustofluidic technology that isolates submicron particles
SUTD researchers and their collaborators developed a novel nanoacoustic trapping device that manipulates particles within submicron ranges by applying a structured elastic layer at the interface between a microfluidic channel and a travelling surface acoustic wave (SAW). This novel acoustofluidic device provides a promising solution for sorting and size-selective capture of nanoscale objects that requires patterning into discrete traps at the single-particle level. (2020-05-19)

Two-face god in sound: Directionality beyond spin-directed acoustics
Understanding unidirectional and topological wave phenomena requires the unveiling of intrinsic geometry and symmetry for wave dynamics. This is an essential challenging for the flexible control of near-field evanescent waves. However, exploitations of near-field waves are limited due to the lack of fundamental understanding about inherent near-field symmetries and directional couplings at subwavelengths, especially for longitudinal waves. Here, Chinese scientists show the efficient selective couplings enabled by near-field symmetry properties based on the acoustic wave platform. (2020-05-12)

Tuning into dolphin chatter could boost conservation efforts
Researchers from Edith Cowan University (ECU) in Australia and Curtin University have moved an important step closer to using sound rather than sight to track individual dolphin activity. Their study, which has potential implications for dolphin communities around the world, investigated whether there was a way to attribute unique whistles to individual bottlenose dolphins living in Western Australia's Swan River. (2020-04-29)

Additions to resource industry underwater robots can boost ocean discoveries
Underwater robots are regularly used by the oil and gas industry to inspect and maintain offshore structures. The same machines could be adapted to gather extra scientific information, thus boosting environmental and resource management capabilities, an Australian-led study has revealed. (2020-04-15)

New research sheds light on the unique 'call' of Ross Sea killer whales
New Curtin University-led research has found that the smallest type of killer whale has 28 different complex calls, comprising a combination of burst-pulse sounds and whistles, which they use to communicate with family members about the changing landscape and habitat. (2020-02-26)

APS tip sheet: Listening to bursting bubbles
Sound signatures from violent fluid events, like bubbles bursting, can be used to measure forces at work during these events. (2020-02-24)

Deep learning can fool listeners by imitating any guitar amplifier
A study from the Aalto Acoustics Lab demonstrates that digital simulations of guitar amplifiers can sound just like the real thing. The implications are that as the software models continue to improve, they can replace traditional analogue guitar amplifiers, which are bulky, fragile and expensive. (2020-02-11)

Acoustic focusing to amass microplastics in water
Microplastics suspended in water can be gathered using acoustic forces in microchannels. The bulk acoustic wave (BAW) device can be customized to gather microplastic fibers and particles of different sizes. When run in series and parallels, the device can successfully concentrate free floating microplastics in large amounts of water into very manageable quantities. This is a promising new technique to clean our laundry grey water before they are released into the environment. (2019-12-09)

Fish scattering sound waves has impact on aquaculture
Fisheries acoustics have been studied for over 40 years to assess biomass and optimize aquaculture applications, and researchers in France have examined the phenomenon of how fish scatter acoustic waves in a dense school of fish contained in an open-sea cage. They developed an approach to help overcome issues encountered in aquaculture relating to the evaluation of the total biomass of dense schools of fish. They will discuss their work at the 178th ASA Meeting. (2019-12-06)

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