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Current Acs Member News and Events, Acs Member News Articles.
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Touchy nanotubes work better when clean
Heating carbon nanotubes at high temperatures and slowly cooling them eliminates contaminants that make nanotubes difficult to test for conductivity. Scientists from Rice and Swansea universities show how decontaminated nanotubes may simplify the design and manufacture of nanoscale devices. (2018-01-04)

Novel MOF shell-derived surface modification of Li-rich layered oxide cathode
The poor cycling stability and low rate performance become the big bottleneck of high specific capacity Li-rich layered oxide materials. Recently, a research team led by Prof. L. Q. Mai at Wuhan University of Technology developed a unique NiCo nanodots decorated carbon shell on Li1.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13O2 nanoparticles. The unique protective C&NiCo shell allows fast electron and ion transport and provides a robust structure for LLO. The obtained LLO@C&NiCo cathode exhibits enhanced cycling and rate capability. (2017-12-29)

How to spot fake metals with acids (video)
Acids are reactive, with even weak acids like vinegar interacting with other materials to wow students. But strong acids can really put on a show. For example, aqua regia, or royal water, is a mixture of two strong acids -- hydrochloric and nitric acids -- that can dissolve gold, a noble metal. This reaction can be put to use. Watch as Reactions employs some acid know-how to explain a chemistry detective story to sort real gold from its imposters. (2017-12-21)

Blueberry vinegar improves memory in mice with amnesia
Dementia affects millions of people worldwide, robbing them of their ability to think, remember and live as they once did. In the search for new ways to fight cognitive decline, scientists report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that blueberry vinegar might offer some help. They found that the fermented product could restore cognitive function in mice. (2017-12-20)

Panning for silver in laundry wastewater
Silver nanoparticles are being used in clothing for their anti-odor abilities but some of this silver comes off when the clothes are laundered. The wastewater from this process could end up in the environment, possibly harming aquatic life, so researchers have attempted to recover the silver. Now, one group reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that detergent chemistry plays a significant role in how much of this silver can be removed from laundry wastewater. (2017-12-20)

Harnessing sperm to treat gynecological diseases
Delivering drugs specifically to cancer cells is one approach researchers are taking to minimize treatment side effects. Stem cells, bacteria and other carriers have been tested as tiny delivery vehicles. Now a new potential drug carrier to treat gynecological conditions has joined the fleet: sperm. Scientists report in the journal ACS Nano that they have exploited the swimming power of sperm to ferry a cancer drug directly to a cervical tumor in lab tests. (2017-12-20)

Expanding solar energy without encroaching on potential farmland and conservation areas
As the world tries to combat climate change, sustainable forms of energy are on the rise. Solar energy is of particular interest, but arrays of photovoltaic panels take up a lot of space and can compete for prime food-producing land. Now researchers, reporting in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology, have found plenty of places to install solar devices without taking up arable land, while generating enough power to help regions meet their energy goals. (2017-12-19)

Improving cyber security in harsh environments
Many people don't worry about the security of their personal information until it's too late. And protecting data is even more important for military personnel, whose lives could be in danger if some types of information were to get into the wrong hands. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano a new way to protect data, especially when it is subjected to extreme environmental conditions. (2017-12-13)

Bringing 'Avatar'-like glowing plants to the real world
The 2009 film 'Avatar' created a lush imaginary world, illuminated by magical, glowing plants. Now researchers are starting to bring this spellbinding vision to life to help reduce our dependence on artificial lighting. They report in ACS' journal Nano Letters a way to infuse plants with the luminescence of fireflies.  (2017-12-13)

Creating surfaces that repel water and control its flow (video)
To prevent water and ice from making our shoes soggy, frosting our car windows and weighing down power lines with icicles, scientists have been exploring new coatings that can repel water. Now one team has developed a way to direct where the water goes when it's pushed away. Their report appears in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2017-12-13)

Why do some people hate cilantro? (video)
Cilantro is a popular seasoning, adding flavor to tacos and noodle dishes across the globe. But to some people, it just tastes like soap. Why? Research suggests a genetic cause for cilantro repulsion. Reactions explains why some people can't help their cilantro-phobia: https://youtu.be/HF7Ni347Gvg. (2017-12-12)

Nanotexturing creates bacteria-killing spikes on stainless steel surfaces
By using an electrochemical etching process on a common stainless steel alloy, researchers have created a nanotextured surface that kills bacteria while not harming mammalian cells. If additional research supports early test results, the process might be used to attack microbial contamination on implantable medical devices and on food processing equipment made with the metal. (2017-12-12)

Diesel vehicles in oil sands operations contribute to regional pollution
Wildfires, cigarette smoking and vehicles all emit a potentially harmful compound called isocyanic acid. The substance has been linked to several health conditions, including heart disease and cataracts. Scientists investigating sources of the compound have now identified off-road diesel vehicles in oil sands production in Alberta, Canada, as a major contributor to regional levels of the pollutant. Their report appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology. (2017-12-06)

'Stressed out' cocoa trees could produce more flavorful chocolate 
Most people agree that chocolate tastes great, but is there a way to make it taste even better? Perhaps, according to scientists who looked at different conditions that can put a strain on cocoa trees. Reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, they say that although the agricultural method used to grow cocoa trees doesn't matter that much, the specific weather conditions do.  (2017-12-06)

Bioelectronic 'nose' can detect food spoilage by sensing the smell of death
Strong odors are an indicator that food has gone bad, but there could soon be a new way to sniff foul smells earlier on. As reported in ACS Nano, researchers have developed a bioelectronic (2017-12-06)

Towards data storage at the single molecule level
Similar to normal hard drives, so-called spin-crossover molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve its storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in journal Nano Letters. (2017-12-06)

How Xanax works (video)
Whether or not you have anxiety, you've probably heard of Xanax. But what's in this popular and widely prescribed drug, and how does it work? This new video from Reactions describes how Xanax works in the anxious brain: https://youtu.be/Kq6oNcd3d-U. (2017-12-05)

Fewer urinary tract infections seen postoperatively at ACS NSQIP®-participating hospitals
A new study of procedure-specific trends in postoperative complications finds that most of 10 types of operations have improved rates of surgical site and bladder infections since 2008. (2017-12-01)

Study suggests measurable impact of colorectal cancer screening program
A new study suggests that an American Cancer Society (ACS) program has been effective in promoting improvements in colorectal cancer screening rates in federally qualified health centers (2017-11-30)

The ultimate defense against hackers may be just a few atoms thick
The next generation of electronic hardware security may be at hand as researchers at NYU Tandon School of Engineering introduce a new class of unclonable cybersecurity security primitives made of a low-cost nanomaterial with the highest possible level of structural randomness. Randomness is highly desirable for constructing the security primitives that encrypt and thereby secure computer hardware and data physically, rather than by programming. (2017-11-29)

To improve dipstick diagnostic and environmental tests, just add tape
Simple paper-strip testing has the potential to tell us quickly what's in water, and other liquid samples from food, the environment and bodies -- but current tests don't handle solid samples well. Now researchers have developed a way to make these low-cost devices more versatile and reliable for analyzing both liquid and solid samples using adhesive tape. They report their approach in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2017-11-29)

Getting a better handle on methane emissions from livestock
Cattle, swine and poultry contribute a hefty portion to the average American's diet, but raising all this livestock comes at a cost to the environment: The industry produces a lot of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Just how much gas the animals release, however, is the subject of debate. Now, one group reports in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology that a new approach could shed light on how accurate current data are. (2017-11-29)

Preventing psoriasis with vanillin
Small amounts of artificial vanilla extract, also known as vanillin, are in a wide range of products, from baked goods to perfumes. But vanillin's versatility doesn't stop there. In a recent mouse study reported in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers report that this compound could also prevent or reduce psoriatic skin inflammation. (2017-11-29)

How hand sanitizers work (video)
Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are the ubiquitous little squeeze-bottle heroes of airports and hospitals, our allies during cold and flu season, and supposedly effective against a huge variety of disease-causing viruses and bacteria. But what's really in hand sanitizers? And is it true that they kill 99.99% of germs, as popular brands claim? Reactions breaks down the contents of your hand sanitizer in this new video: https://youtu.be/245jz3ZqZqM. (2017-11-28)

The art and science of glassblowing (video)
If you've ever tapped a screen to send a tweet, opted for a glass bottled soda because of taste, or drooled over art glass in a gallery, then your life has been changed for the better by the transparent yet durable combination of sand and simple chemicals we call glass. Reactions visited McFadden Art Glass in Baltimore, Maryland, to learn about the chemistry of this ancient material. (2017-11-21)

Three-dimensional nanomagnets for the computer of tomorrow
Since the late 60's electronic devices have stored and transmitted information (bits) in two-dimensional circuits. Now, researchers at the University of Cambridge have been able to break this barrier by creating a nanoscale magnetic circuit capable of moving information along the three dimensions of space. This breakthrough could lead to an important increase in storage and processing capacities of electronic devices over those used today. (2017-11-15)

Pulling iron out of waste printer toner
Someday, left-over toner in discarded printer cartridges could have a second life as bridge or building components instead of as trash, wasting away in landfills and potentially harming the environment. One group reports in ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering that they have devised a method to recycle the residual powder in 'empty' cartridges into iron using temperatures that are compatible with existing industrial processes. (2017-11-15)

Wine 'legs' and minibot motors (video)
As any wine enthusiast knows, the 'legs' that run down a glass after a gentle swirl of vino can yield clues about alcohol content. Interestingly, the physical phenomenon that helps create these legs can be harnessed to propel tiny motors to carry out tasks on the surface of water. Scientists demonstrate the motors in a report in ACS' journal Langmuir. (2017-11-15)

After cooking, biofortified corn and eggs retain nutrient needed to prevent blindness
Fortified and biofortified foods are at the forefront of efforts to combat vitamin A deficiency worldwide. But little is known about what influence processing may have on the retention of vitamin A precursors in these foods. Now in a study appearing in ACS Omega, scientists report that a high percentage of these healthful substances -- in some cases, almost all -- can survive cooking, depending on the preparation method.  (2017-11-15)

The only detox you'll ever need (video)
People talk all the time about how they need to 'detox.' And there's a line of companies a mile long waiting to sell you juices and smoothies that claim to cleanse your body of harmful toxins. But the good news is your body is working hard to clear out toxins before you spend a dime on expensive products. Toxicology expert Raychelle Burks explains how in this kale-free episode of Reactions: https://youtu.be/zv0chkuT7cQ. (2017-11-14)

Does clinical evaluation plus noninvasive cardiac testing improve outcomes?
Ordering coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) or stress testing for patients with chest pain in the emergency department appeared to prolong their stay and increase use of hospital resources without benefit if the patients' history and physical exam, ectrocardiogram (ECG) and blood testing were already normal. (2017-11-14)

Researchers put new spin on old technique to engineer better absorptive materials
A team of University of Illinois bioengineers has taken a new look at an old tool to help characterize a class of materials called metal organic frameworks -- MOFs for short. MOFs are used to detect, purify and store gases, and could help solve some of the world's most challenging energy, environmental and pharmaceutical challenges -- they can even pull water molecules straight from the air to provide relief from drought. (2017-11-13)

Better, bolder printing with silicon nanostructures
From textbooks to artwork to newspapers, printed items are a part of our everyday life. But the ink used in today's printers are limited in colors and resolution. Now in a new study in ACS' journal Nano Letters, scientists have found a way to expand the printable color spectrum with a novel nanostructure system. (2017-11-08)

Cleaning up aquatic pollution with mussels
Scientists and activists alike have been looking for a solution to the problem of aquatic nutrient pollution. Now one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology that ribbed mussels are up to the clean-up challenge. (2017-11-08)

New 'sugar-glass' film uses viruses to kill harmful bacteria in food
With antibiotic resistance on the rise, bacterial contamination of food is becoming more problematic. Now in a study appearing in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, scientists report that they have developed an antibacterial 'sugar-glass' coating in which viruses that destroy bacteria are embedded and are kept stable for up to three months. The coating could someday be used in the food packaging and processing industries to help prevent food-borne illnesses and deaths. (2017-11-08)

Cool textiles to beat the heat
Air-conditioned buildings bring welcome relief to people coming in from the heat. But creating that comfort comes with a cost to our wallets and the environment in the form of increased energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions. Now researchers report in ACS Nano the development of a new material for clothing that we could one day don as our own personal cooling unit, without any external energy needed to power it.   (2017-11-08)

First-ever US experiments at new X-ray facility may lead to better explosive modeling
For the first time in the US, time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (TRSAXS) is used to observe ultra-fast carbon clustering and graphite and nanodiamond production in the insensitive explosive Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) 9502, potentially leading to better computer models of explosive performance. (2017-11-06)

Computer system finds 'recipes' for producing materials
System could pore through millions of research papers to extract 'recipes' for producing materials. (2017-11-06)

Chemists develop method to quickly screen, accurately identify fentanyl
Researchers at McMaster University have developed a new drug screening technique that could lead to the rapid and accurate identification of fentanyl, as well as a vast number of other drugs of abuse, which up until now have been difficult to detect by traditional urine tests. (2017-11-03)

Dioxane-chomping microbe has helpful gene
Rice University researchers have discovered a bacteria-borne gene that triggers the degradation of dioxane, a groundwater contaminant and suspected carcinogen. The discovery could lead to a tool that helps decide how to treat contaminated sites. (2017-11-02)

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