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Simulating wind farm development
Engineers have devised a model to describe how, in the process of establishing wind farms, interactions between developers and landowners affect energy production costs. (2020-06-19)

Five steps to stop the death of the most threatened birds of prey
A new study presents a new five-step protocol to mitigate the mortality of birds of prey due to accidents with infrastructures (power lines, etc.) and other unnatural causes. The protocol that could also be applied to the conservation of other terrestrial vertebrates is a new scientific contribution from the Conservation Biology Group , led by the lecturer Joan Real, from the Faculty of Biology and the Biodiversity Research Institute (IRBio) of the University of Barcelona. (2020-06-18)

Keeping governments accountable: The COVID-10 assessment scorecard
Many actors in the response to COVID-19 are holding out for a vaccine to be developed. But in the meantime, tried and tested public-health measures for controlling outbreaks can be implemented. A scorecard can be used to assess governments' responses to the outbreak. (2020-06-12)

Watch: Babies know when you imitate them -- and like it
Six-month old infants recognize when adults imitate them, and perceive imitators as more friendly, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden. The babies looked and smiled longer at an adult who imitated them, as opposed to when the adult responded in other ways. Babies also approached them more, and engaged in imitating games. The research is published in PLOS One. (2020-05-26)

Mississippi Delta marshes in a state of irreversible collapse, Tulane study shows
A key finding of the study, published in Science Advances, is that coastal marshes experience tipping points, where a small increase in the rate of sea-level rise leads to widespread submergence. (2020-05-22)

A new algorithm predicts the difficulty in fighting fire
The tool completes previous studies with new variables and could improve the ability to respond to forest fires. (2020-05-20)

Found: Brain structure that controls our behavior
Solving problems, planning one's own actions, controlling emotions -- these executive functions are fundamental processes for controlling our behavior. Despite numerous indications, there has not yet been any clear evidence to support which brain areas process these abilities. A study at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) has now succeeded in identifying the crucial region -- with the help of a unique patient and the not-so-rare dysexecutive syndrome. (2020-05-19)

Cooperation can be contagious particularly when people see the benefit for others
Seeing someone do something good for someone else motivates witnesses to perform their own helpful acts, an insight that could help drive cooperative behavior in communities navigating through the health crisis. (2020-05-19)

Climate change threatens progress in cancer control
Climate change threatens prospects for further progress in cancer prevention and control, increasing exposure to cancer risk factors and impacting access to cancer care, according to a new commentary by scientists from the American Cancer Society and Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. (2020-05-18)

Waiting game: testing the patience of predators and prey
A new report from Kyoto University shows that freezing in action when a snake and frog face off is not about fear but rather a delicate waiting game of patience, with each animal waiting for and anticipating its opponent's actions. (2020-05-11)

Deciphering the hidden interactions within biological networks of varying sizes
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba discovered that fish schools showed a significant change in behavior with varying school sizes. Using integrated information theory, they showed that a significant change in the interaction between the fish and the overall collective behavior occurred between three- and four-fish schools, including the emergence of leadership within the group. These findings help understand the dynamics of collective behavior. (2020-05-07)

We believe we're less likely than others are to fall for online scams
We believe we are less likely than others are to fall for phishing scams, thereby underestimating our own exposure to risk, a new cybersecurity study has found. (2020-05-06)

Investors punish for social irresponsibility depending on proportion of company execs with law degrees
The extent to which investors punish firms for corporate social irresponsibility is associated with the proportion of top management executives in a firm who have a law degree, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (2020-04-30)

Memory misfires help selfish maintain their self-image
When asked to recall how generous they were in the past, selfish people tend to remember being more benevolent than they actually were, according to a series of experiments by Yale psychologists and economists at University of Zurich published April 29, 2020 in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-04-29)

Mindfulness program may benefit patients with irritable bowel syndrome
Adults with irritable bowel syndrome experienced fewer gastrointestinal symptoms after they participated in a mindfulness program meant to reduce stress. Results of the study are published in Neurogastroenterology & Motility. (2020-04-08)

Extreme action costs popular support for protest movements, new study finds
New research has found that social change advocates face an 'activist's dilemma.' While extreme actions can bring more attention to a cause than moderate ones, they are more likely to diminish support, even among natural sympathizers, the study found. (2020-04-08)

Landmark study concludes marine life can be rebuilt by 2050
An international study recently published in the journal Nature that was led by KAUST professors Carlos Duarte and Susana Agustí lays out the essential roadmap of actions required for the planet's marine life to recover to full abundance by 2050. (2020-04-01)

Infants prefer individuals who achieve their goals efficiently
From birth, we acquire information and learn through interacting with others; that is why it is so important to be able to identify the most suitable individuals to interact with. To interact with others, it is important to understand and predict their actions. It is known that at around six months of age, infants already understand that actions are carried out to achieve certain goals, that is, when someone does an action, they do so to get something. (2020-03-31)

Cooperative male dolphins match the tempo of each other's calls
When it comes to working together, male dolphins coordinate their behavior just like us. New findings, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B by an international team of researchers from the Universities of Western Australia and Bristol, provide insight into the importance of physical and vocal coordination in alliance forming animals. (2020-03-31)

Conspiracy beliefs could increase fringe political engagement, shows new study
New research appearing in Social Psychological and Personality Science finds that when studying an average person, conspiracy beliefs lead to more willingness for engagement in 'non-normative' roles, like illegally blocking a public entryway, while avoiding more typical political engagement, such as voting. (2020-02-28)

Seagulls favor food humans have handled
Seagulls favor food that has been handled by humans, new research shows. (2020-02-25)

Family dynamics may influence suicidal thoughts in children
Research from Washington University in St. Louis shows a nontrivial rate of children as young as 9- and 10- years old are thinking about suicide. How their families interact -- or don't -- may play a role. (2020-02-07)

Movement study could be significant in helping understand brain rehabilitation
Researchers from the University of Plymouth (UK) and Technical University of Munich (Germany) say their study could be particularly important for those working in rehabilitation and helping people to recover after neurological conditions. (2020-01-30)

Experiencing police brutality increases mistrust in medical institutions, impacts health
There is plenty of data showing that police brutality leads to mistrust of police and law enforcement. Researchers from Lehigh University and the University of Minnesota set out to see if experience with police brutality might affect health by causing mistrust in medical institutions. Through an analysis of data gleaned from a survey of 4,000 people living in urban areas about their experiences with police brutality, they found that there is a relationship between police brutality and mistrust in medical institutions. (2020-01-30)

Neural effects of acute stress on appetite: a magnetoencephalography study
The authors showed that the acute mental stress induced by the anticipation of forthcoming events could suppress subjective level of appetite in humans and this suppression of the appetite appeared to be associated with the neural activity of the frontal pole involved in the thinking and planning of future actions. These findings provide valuable clues to gain a further understanding of the neural mechanisms by which acute stress affects appetite. (2020-01-29)

Hey Google, are my housemates using my smart speaker?
Surveys show that consumers are worried that smart speakers are eavesdropping on their conversations and day-to-day lives. Now University of British Columbia researchers have found that people are also concerned about something else: friends, family and others who may have access to these devices. (2020-01-28)

Helping prevent eco-interventions from backfiring
Drastic ecosystem interventions like eradicating an unwanted species can sometimes backfire, but new University of Queensland-led modelling may help to avoid these ecological hiccups. Dr Matthew Adams, from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said despite all good intentions, ecological interventions can have devastating consequences. (2020-01-28)

Research suggests benefits of conservation efforts may not yet be fully visible
Last year, a UN report on global biodiversity warned one million species are at risk of extinction within decades, putting the world's natural life-support systems in jeopardy. But work published today in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution offers new hope that in some cases, conservation measures may not necessarily be failing, it is just too early to see the progress that is being made. (2020-01-27)

Investigation: Problems in clinical trial reporting continue amid lax federal enforcement
Companies, universities, and other institutions that conduct clinical trials are required to record the results of most of them in a federal database, so that doctors and patients can see whether new treatments are safe and effective. (2020-01-13)

Dogs and wolves are both good at cooperating
A team of researchers have found that dogs and wolves are equally good at cooperating with partners to obtain a reward. When tested in same-species pairs, dogs and wolves proved equally successful and efficient at solving a given problem. This finding suggests that basic cooperation abilities were present in a common ancestor of dogs and wolves, and have not been lost in the domestication process. (2020-01-06)

Researchers united on international road map to insect recovery
It's no secret that many insects are struggling worldwide. But we could fix these insects' problems, according to more than 70 scientists from 21 countries. Their road map to insect conservation and recovery is published in Nature Ecology & Evolution this week. From urgent 'no-regret' solutions to long-term global comparisons. (2020-01-06)

Achieving optimal collaboration when goals conflict
New research suggests that, when two people must work together on a physical task despite conflicting goals, the amount of information available about each other's actions influences how quickly and optimally they learn to collaborate. Vinil Chackochan and Vittorio Sanguineti of the University of Genoa, Italy, present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-12-12)

How are Utah's dry lakes impacting air quality and human health?
A new study from BYU reveals that 90 percent of Utah urban dust comes from dry lakebeds, which not only impacts air quality but also impacting soil and what can grow in it. (2019-12-10)

Conservative boards more likely to dismiss CEO
Leaning left or right in the political spectrum may affect how a company's board manages CEO dismissal, finds SMU Assistant Professor David Gomulya. (2019-12-03)

Spirituality affects the behavior of mortgagers
According to Olga Miroshnichenko, a Sc.D in Economics, and a Professor at the Department of Economics and Finance, Tyumen State University, morals affect the thinking of mortgage payers and help them avoid past due payments. The study was presented at the 3rd All-Russia Research and Practice Conference 'Financial and Legal Aspects of Socially-Oriented Investments' in Ural State University of Economics, Ekaterinburg. (2019-11-29)

A method with roots in AI uncovers how humans make choices in groups and social media
Using a mathematical framework with roots in artificial intelligence and robotics, UW researchers were able to uncover the process for how a person makes choices in groups. And, they also found they were able to predict a person's choice more often than more traditional descriptive methods. (2019-11-27)

Multifunctional small brains
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience in Amsterdam, discovered that not only the cerebral cortex is responsible for higher perceptual abilities but that the cerebellum also plays a role. This discovery can help understand the consequences of damage to the small brain, since not only motoric impairment will appear, but also social cognition can be altered. The study was published today in the prominent scientific journal Brain. (2019-11-21)

Bot can beat humans in multiplayer hidden-role games
MIT researchers have developed a bot equipped with artificial intelligence that can beat human players in tricky online multiplayer games where player roles and motives are kept secret. (2019-11-20)

Conservation scientists call for reverse to biodiversity loss
A group of international conservationists is urging governments across the globe to adopt a new approach to address the impact of economic development on the natural world. Renowned researchers, including University of Queensland scientists, aim to draw attention to what they call ''net positive outcomes for nature''. (2019-11-08)

Training in mental ill-health a determinant of managers' preventive actions
Managers who have received training in mental health issues, and whose workplaces run general information campaigns on mental health, are significantly more likely to work preventively in this area vis-à-vis their subordinates, a study shows. This applies irrespective of organization size and managers' own experiences of mental ill-health. (2019-10-31)

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