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Periodontal disease increases risk of major cardiovascular events
People with periodontitis are at higher risk of experiencing major cardiovascular events, according to new research from Forsyth Institute and Harvard University scientists and colleagues. (2021-02-21)

Blueprint for fault-tolerant qubits
Building a quantum computer is a challenging task because of the fragility of quantum bits. To deal with this problem, various types of active error correction techniques have been developed. In contrast, researchers from Jülich and Aachen together with partners from Basel and Delft have now proposed a design for an inherently fault protected circuit with passive error correction that could significantly accelerate the construction of a quantum computer with a large number of qubits. (2021-02-18)

How Spanish children get to school: New study on active commuting
The researchers analysed how Spanish children and adolescents get to school, based on studies examining the commuting patterns of 36,781 individuals over a 7-year period (2010-2017) (2021-02-17)

Scientists of Kemerovo State University have developed a technology for creating in vitro root
Scientists of Kemerovo State University have developed a technology for creating in vitro root cultures with a high content of biologically active substances. (2021-02-16)

Swirlonic super particles baffle physicists
We report a novel state of active matter--a swirlonic state. It is comprised of swirlons, formed by groups of active particles orbiting their common center of mass. (2021-02-11)

Artificial Intelligence beats us in chess, but not in memory
A new piece of research shows that the brain strategy for storing memories may lead to imperfect memories, but in turn, allows it to store more memories, and with less hassle than AI. The new study, carried out by SISSA scientists in collaboration with Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience & Centre for Neural Computation, Trondheim, Norway, has just been published in Physical Review Letters. (2021-01-15)

Sleep is irreplaceable for the recovery of the brain
Researchers at the Medical Center - University of Freiburg demonstrate, for the first time directly, that active recovery processes take place in the brain during sleep that cannot be replaced by rest / Findings relevant for optimal performance (2021-01-07)

Researchers develop new combined process for 3D printing
Chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a way to integrate liquids directly into materials during the 3D printing process. This allows, for example, active medical agents to be incorporated into pharmaceutical products or luminous liquids to be integrated into materials, which allow monitoring of damage. The study was published in ''Advanced Materials Technologies''. (2020-12-16)

Researchers find 'missing link'
Otago researchers have found the ''missing link between stress and infertility''. (2020-12-03)

Having it both ways: a combined strategy in catalyst design for Suzuki cross-couplings
cientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have designed a novel catalyst for the Suzuki cross-coupling reaction, which is widely used in the synthesis of industrial and pharmaceutical organic chemicals. Their strategy of loading an intermetallic Pd compound onto a support sharing the same element yields a stable and cost-effective catalyst that outperforms commercially available alternatives. (2020-12-02)

Doctors confirm the existence of multiple chronotypes
Having conducted a large-scale study, a team of scientists improved the classification of human diurnal activity and suggested using 6 chronotypes instead of just 'early birds' and 'night owls'. Two thousand participants, including the employees of the Institute of Medicine of RUDN University, were tested in the course of the research. (2020-11-26)

Weight loss shouldn't be the goal of PE
For adults, the goal of exercise is often to shed some pounds, but new research from the University of Georgia suggests the objective should be different for kids. (2020-11-10)

Active surveillance safe for African Americans with low-risk prostate cancer
Researchers with UC San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center say active surveillance is safe for African American men with low-risk prostate cancer. (2020-11-03)

New efficacies of Ganoderma lucidum: Treatment of skin conditions like atopic dermatitis
Ganoderma lucidum, known as Yeongji mushroom in Korea, has long been used medicinally in China, Japan and Korea. Ganoderic acid, an active ingredient found in the mushroom, is known for its excellence in enhancing the immune function of cells. The Korean research team determined the conditions for enhancing the anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, and antioxidant effects of Ganoderma lucidum and confirmed its marketability as an anti-inflammatory agent for the skin. (2020-10-07)

Yes or No: Forcing a choice increased statin prescribing for heart disease patients
Adding an 'active choice' nudge to the electronic health record increased statin prescribing for patients with heart disease, but not for those 'at-risk'. (2020-10-07)

Stable supramolecular structure system to identify activity origin of CO2 electroreduction
N-doped or N-heterocyclic nanostructured electrocatalysts for electrocatalytic CO2 reduction reaction have made important progress in product selectivity. For further development, it is significant to identify exactly activity origin of these electrocatalysts. Crystal electrocatalysts with accurate structure can provide a visual research platform for identifying catalytic active sites and studying reaction mechanism. The catalytic activity of pyridine N for CO2 electroreduction was firstly determined structurally by crystal supramolecular coordination compound model system. (2020-09-28)

How researchers look at the bird brain in action
How do birds make decisions and which brain regions are particularly active when they solve tasks? Researchers from Bochum are investigating these questions. So far, only anesthetized birds and therefore passive experiments could be examined using the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thus, the examination of brain processes during active tasks was not possible. Now the researchers have constructed an experimental set-up which allows them to carry out fMRI examinations on awake pigeons and thus also investigate cognitive processes for the first time. (2020-09-18)

Iron is to blame for carbon dioxide emissions from soil, says a soil scientists from RUDN
Iron minerals and bacteria can be the main agents of carbon dioxide emissions from the soil. A soil scientist from RUDN University made this conclusion after studying the process of organic plant waste decomposition of the micro-level. Iron and hydrogen peroxide enter into a reaction, as a result of which active oxygen forms (oxygen radicals) are formed. The radicals destroy plant waste in the soil and promote carbon dioxide emissions. (2020-09-09)

IKBFU scientists suggest using heather as an antioxidant
Researchers have proven heather to be effective herbal medicinal raw material. This small relict, evergreen shrub is a widespread plant in Europe and has long been used as a medicine for the treatment of rheumatism, arthritis, as well as an antiseptic, choleretic, wound healing, expectorant. (2020-08-24)

New kind of interaction discovered in hydrogen-producing enzymes
Hydrogenases can convert hydrogen just as efficiently as expensive platinum catalysts. In order to make them usable for biotechnological applications, researchers are deciphering how they work in detail. A team from Bochum and Oxford now reports in the journal PNAS that the transfer of protons and electrons by the enzyme takes place spatially separated, but is nevertheless coupled and thus, a decisive factor for efficiency. (2020-08-17)

Designed bacteria produce coral-antibiotic
Corals growing on the reefs of the Bahamas produce an active agent that kills multi-resistant tuberculosis bacteria. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have managed to produce the antibiotic biotechnologically in the laboratory - fast, cost-efficient and sustainably. (2020-08-17)

Smoking strongly linked to women's lower take up of cancer screening services
Smoking is strongly linked to lower use of cancer screening services by women, and more advanced disease once cancer is diagnosed, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2020-08-13)

Methanol synthesis: Insights into the structure of an enigmatic catalyst
To render the production process more efficient, it would be helpful to know more about the copper/zinc oxide/aluminium oxide catalyst deployed in methanol production. To date, however, it hasn't been possible to analyse the structure of its surface under reaction conditions. A team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion has now succeeded in gaining insights into the structure of its active site. (2020-08-04)

Differences between discs of active and non-active galaxies detected for the first time
A study led by researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), making comparison between the discs of several pairs of spiral galaxies, active and non-active, concludes that in the discs of the former the rotational motion of the stars is of greater importance. (2020-07-31)

Scientists discover volcanoes on Venus are still active
A new study identified 37 recently active volcanic structures on Venus. The study provides some of the best evidence yet that Venus is still a geologically active planet. A research paper on the work, which was conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland and the Institute of Geophysics at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, was published in the journal Nature Geoscience. (2020-07-20)

Prostate cancer: How can we decide when to treat?
You have been diagnosed with prostate cancer and your doctor gives you the option of not being treated, but of remaining under observation: is there any objective way you can decide to be treated or not treated? What should you do? Now using first results from analysis of the world's biggest Active Surveillance prostate cancer database, scientists have begun to identify which patients are at risk of the disease developing and which patients can continue to safely delay treatment. (2020-07-18)

3D magnetotelluric imaging reveals magma recharging beneath Weishan volcano
Researches have succeeded in obtaining a high-resolution 3D resistivity model of approximately 20 km depth beneath the Weishan volcano in the Wudalianchi volcanic field (WVF) for the first time. The study evealed the image of potential magma chambers and the estimated melt fractions. (2020-06-28)

A new synthesis of poly heterocyclic compounds: Expected anti-cancer reagents
In this article, we have described a new practical cyclocondensation synthesis for a series of [1,2,4]triazolo[4,3-c]pyrido[3,2-e] pyrimidine and pyrido[2',3':4,5] pyrimido[6,1-c][1,2,4] triazine from 2-amino-3-cyano-4.6-diarylpyridines. (2020-06-22)

Researchers map out intricate processes that activate key brain molecule
For the first time, scientists have revealed the steps needed to turn on a receptor that helps regulate neuron firing. The findings might help researchers understand and someday treat addiction, psychosis and other neuropsychological diseases. (2020-06-17)

Stocks of vulnerable carbon twice as high where permafrost subsidence is factored in
Twice as much carbon in permafrost is vulnerable to microbial respiration when researchers from Northern Arizona University accounted for subsidence, the gradual sinking of terrain caused by loss of ice and soil mass. These finds suggest more accurate measurements must be made across the permafrost zone to better predict global carbon fluxes. (2020-06-17)

Research sheds new light on intelligent life existing across the galaxy
Is there anyone out there? This is an age-old question that researchers have now shed new light on with a study that calculates there could be more than 30 intelligent civilizations throughout our Galaxy. This is an enormous advance over previous estimates which spanned from zero to billions. (2020-06-15)

Fuel walking and cycling with low carbon diets, researchers say
Walking and cycling have many benefits and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions, but researchers say we need to think about what people eat to fuel their walking and cycling. (2020-06-11)

Physical activity in all of its forms may help maintain muscle mass in midlife
Loss of estrogen has an effect on muscles and leads to a decline in muscle mass. Physical activity in all of its forms may help maintain muscle mass in midlife. (2020-06-08)

Dreaming with purpose
Researchers from University of Tsukuba and the University of Tokyo have found that activity in adult-born neurons (ABNs) in the hippocampus, which is a brain region associated with memory, are responsible for memory consolidation during REM sleep. Identifying the role of specific neurons in memory function deepens our understanding of how memories are formed, retrieved, and consolidated. (2020-06-05)

Possible physical trace of short-term memory found
How do we remember a phone number we were just about to call? Already Plato and Aristotle asked how memory is stored as changes in the brain. In a new study, Professor Peter Jonas and his group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), including first author David Vandael, found that short-term memory may be formed by storing vesicles of neurotransmitter. These vesicle pools could be an ''engram,'' a physical trace of memory. (2020-06-02)

Study finds gender differences in active learning classrooms
Men participated more in an active learning course in science, technology, engineering and math, while women reported lower perceptions of their scientific abilities, were more aware of gender identity and more likely to feel judged based on gender, a new Cornell-led study has found. (2020-06-01)

New model predicts the peaks of the COVID-19 pandemic
This week in the journal Frontiers, researchers describe a single function that accurately describes all existing available data on active COVID-19 cases and deaths -- and predicts forthcoming peaks. (2020-05-29)

Study: Ultra-thin fibres designed to protect nerves after brain surgery
The drug nimodipine could prevent nerve cells from dying after brain surgery. Pharmacists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), in cooperation with neurosurgeons at University Hospital Halle (Saale) (UKH), have developed a new method that enables the drug to be administered directly in the brain with fewer side effects. Their findings were published in the ''European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics''. (2020-05-27)

Lidar technology demonstrates how light levels determine mosquito 'rush hour'
The first study to remotely track wild mosquito populations using laser radar (lidar) technology found that mosquitoes in a southeastern Tanzanian village are most active during morning and evening 'rush hour' periods, suggesting these may be the most effective times to target the insects with sprays designed to prevent the spread of malaria. (2020-05-13)

A census of star brightness: The sun is less active and variable than similar stars
By analyzing the brightness variations of 369 solar-like stars, researchers have concluded that the sun is less magnetically active and shows less variability in its brightness than similar stars in the galaxy. (2020-04-30)

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