Current Acurate Neo News and Events

Current Acurate Neo News and Events, Acurate Neo News Articles.
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Models to predict dengue, zika and yellow fever outbreaks are developed by researchers
Scientists will monitor areas in which these diseases are endemic, such as São Paulo, the Amazon, the Pantanal and Panama, to investigate the factors that trigger outbreaks (monkey being examined in Manaus área. (2021-02-23)

How blood stem cells maintain their lifelong potential for self-renewal
A characteristic feature of all stem cells is their ability to self-renew. But how is this potential maintained throughout life? Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Heidelberg Institute for Stem Cell Technology and Experimental Medicine* (HI-STEM) have now discovered in mice that cells in the so-called ''stem cell niche'' are responsible for this, (2021-01-27)

Scientists precisely predict intricate evolutions of multiple-period patterns in bilayers
Surface instability of compliant film/substrate bilayers has raised considerable interests due to its broad applications, yet it is still a challenge to precisely predict and continuously trace secondary bifurcation transitions in the nonlinear post-buckling region. Now researchers at Fudan University develop lattice models to precisely capture the nonlinear morphology evolution with multiple mode transitions that occur in film/substrate systems. (2020-12-15)

Oncotarget: quantitative ultrasound radiomics in prediction of treatment response for breast cancer
The cover for Issue 42 of Oncotarget features Figure 4, ''Generation of parametric and texture maps from radiofrequency data,'' recently published in ''Quantitative ultrasound radiomics using texture derivatives in prediction of treatment response to neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer'' by Dasgupta, et al. which reported that to investigate quantitative ultrasound based higher-order texture derivatives in predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. (2020-10-21)

New bioprosthetic valve for TAVR fails to demonstrate non-inferiority
In a randomized clinical trial, SCOPE II, a new self-expanding bioprosthetic valve used in transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) failed to demonstrate non-inferiority compared to an existing self-expanding valve. (2020-10-15)

No benefit for post-operative radiotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer
Post-operative radiotherapy (PORT) used in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) following complete resection and after (neo) adjuvant chemotherapy shows no statistically significant difference in 3-year disease-free survival (DFS), according to data presented at ESMO 2020. These results give the oncology community a long-awaited answer. (2020-09-20)

Being a selfish jerk doesn't get you ahead, research finds
Two studies provide empirical evidence to settle the question of whether being aggressively Machiavellian helps people get ahead. The studies concluded that being a jerk provides no advantage in career advancement. Any power boost disagreeable people get from being intimidating is offset by their poor interpersonal relationships, the studies concluded. (2020-08-31)

Discovery of novel autoantibody that is a major risk factor for recurrent pregnancy loss
A Kobe University led study has revealed for the first time in the world the high frequency of a novel autoantibody in women suffering from recurrent pregnancy loss. It is expected that these results will contribute towards the illumination of the underlying mechanisms behind this disorder, thrombosis, and pregnancy complications such as hypertensive disorders; leading to the development of new treatment methods. (2020-07-22)

Large differences in personality traits between patients with social anxiety disorder
Individuals with social anxiety disorder have markedly different personality traits than others. Emotional instability and introversion are hallmarks, according to a new study from Uppsala University published in PLOS ONE. (2020-04-29)

Male-killing bugs hold key to butterflies' curious color changes
An international team of researchers have shed new light on the complex reproductive process which dictates that only female offspring of the Danaus chrysippus survive -- all in close proximity to Kenya's capital, Nairobi. (2020-02-28)

Male-killing bacteria linked to butterfly color changes
Like many poisonous animals, the African monarch butterfly's orange, white and black pattern warns predators that it is toxic. Warning patterns like this are usually consistent across individuals to help predators learn to avoid them. However, a recent study, published February 27 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, shows how a population of African monarch butterflies (Danaus chrysippus) breaks this rule and has highly variable warning patterns. (2020-02-28)

NIH-funded study links natural sugars in breastmilk to early childhood height and weight
Human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) found in breastmilk may influence a child's growth from infancy through early childhood, according to a study supported by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). (2020-02-18)

Climate change influenced rise and fall of Northern Iraq's Neo-Assyrian Empire
Changes in climate may have contributed to both the rise and collapse of the Neo-Assyrian Empire in northern Iraq, which was considered the most powerful empire of its time, according to a new study. The results suggest that multi-decade megadroughts aligned with the timing of the empire's collapse in 609 BCE, triggering declines in the region's agricultural productivity that led to political and economic demise within 60 years. (2019-11-13)

Climate may have helped crumble one of the ancient world's most powerful civilizations
New research suggests it was climate-related drought that built the foundation for the collapse of the Assyrian Empire (whose heartland was based in today's northern Iraq)--one of the most powerful civilizations in the ancient world. The Science Advances paper, led by Ashish Sinha at California State University, Dominguez Hills and coauthored by CIRES affiliate Adam Schneider, details how megadroughts in the 7th century BC triggered a decline in Assyria's way of life that contributed to its ultimate collapse. (2019-11-13)

How much do obesity and addictions overlap?
A large analysis of personality studies has found that people with obesity behave somewhat like people with addictions to alcohol or drugs. But obesity is also a complex condition that cannot be fully explained by the addiction model. (2019-10-28)

Critical observation made on Maunakea during first night of return to operations
Observations of the near-Earth asteroid 2006 QV89 made on Aug. 11, 2019 with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) have ruled out any potential future impact threat to the Earth by this asteroid for the next century. (2019-08-13)

New 'liquid biopsy' blood test improves breast cancer diagnostics
A new type of blood test for breast cancer could help avoid thousands of unnecessary surgeries and otherwise precisely monitor disease progression, according to a study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Mayo Clinic in Arizona. TGen is an affiliate of City of Hope, which along with The Cancer Research UK Cambridge Institute at Cambridge University and the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University (ASU) also contributed to this study. (2019-08-07)

Study reveals unusually high carbon stocks and tree diversity in Panama's Darien forest
Through a participatory forest-carbon monitoring project in the Darien forest of Panama, scientists and a team of trained indigenous technicians found that, even in disturbed areas, it maintained the same tree species richness and a disproportionately high capacity to sequester carbon. (2019-07-18)

ESO contributes to protecting Earth from dangerous asteroids
The unique capabilities of the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope have enabled it to obtain the sharpest images of a double asteroid as it flew by Earth on May 25. While this double asteroid was not itself a threatening object, scientists used the opportunity to rehearse the response to a hazardous Near-Earth Object (NEO), proving that ESO's front-line technology could be critical in planetary defense. (2019-06-03)

Anticancer immunity through tumor antigen identification & conversion to DNA vaccines
Wistar scientists and collaborators demonstrated the utility of an optimized synthetic DNA vaccine platform for rapidly inducing immunity against unique combinations of tumor neoantigens. (2019-01-24)

Scientists design protein that prods cancer-fighting T-cells
Scientists have created a new protein that mimics a key immune regulatory protein, interleukin 2 (IL-2). IL-2 is a potent anticancer drug, but with toxic side effects. In a paper in the Jan. 10 issue of Nature, the researchers report using computer programs to design a protein that they have shown in animal models to have the same ability to stimulate cancer-fighting T-cells as IL-2, but without triggering harmful side effects. (2019-01-09)

Macrophage cells key to helping heart repair -- and potentially regenerate: New study
Macrophage cells have the ability to act in a neo-natal-like state, a time in life where they aid in the growth and development of organs, meaning they could be channeled to help repair the heart following a heart attack. (2018-12-11)

Understanding the current rise of the far right using Marx and Lacan
The article posits several arguments suggesting that we must turn to thinkers Marx and Lacan and the philosophical concepts they coined to understand the rise of the far right. (2018-12-04)

New species of Swallowtail butterfly discovered in Fiji
A spectacular new butterfly species has been discovered on the Pacific Island of Vanua Levu in Fiji. The species, named last week as Papilio natewa after the Natewa Peninsula where it was found, is a remarkable discovery in a location where butterfly wildlife was thought to be well known. It was confirmed as a species new to science by John Tennent, Honorary Associate at Oxford University Museum of Natural History, and Scientific Associate of the Natural History Museum, London. (2018-10-30)

Erlotinib improves progression-free survival in early mutated non-small cell lung cancer
Neoadjuvant erlotinib benefits selected epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutated patients who undergo complete resection of stage IIIA-N2 stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), shows a randomised study comparing erlotinib with gemcitabine plus cisplatin as neoadjuvant treatment, presented at the ESMO 2018 Congress in Munich. (2018-10-21)

Toward an 'ultra-personalized' therapy for melanoma
With new immunotherapy treatments for melanoma, recovery rates have risen dramatically, in some cases to around 50 percent. But they could be much higher: A new study led by researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science showed, in lab dishes and animal studies, that a highly personalized approach could help the immune cells improve their abilities to recognize the cancer and kill it. The results of this study were published today in Cancer Discovery. (2018-09-12)

Upper Cretaceous trench deposits of the Neo-Tethyan subduction zone
Exposed along the southern side of the Yarlung Zangbo suture, the Jiachala Formation is a key unit to decipher the history of convergence and subsequent collision between the India and the Asia plates. A new research suggest that the Jiachala Formation was deposited during the Late Cretaceous (~88-84 Ma) in the trench formed along the southern edge of Asia during subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere. (2018-08-27)

New immunotherapy inhibits tumor growth and protects against metastases
Scientists at the VIB-UGent Center for Medical Biotechnology have taken important steps forward in the development of a cancer-targeting immunotherapy. The research team developed a treatment in mice that destroys part of the tumor and stimulates the immune system to attack persistent surviving cancer cells. In addition, the researchers demonstrated that the treatment provides protection against the development of tumor formation in other areas of the body. Their findings have been published in the renowned academic journal Nature Communications. (2018-08-24)

Lifestyle migrants bring good intentions -- but major change -- to Costa Rica
A group of Americans and Europeans has relocated to a Costa Rican community in recent decades, and despite the government cheering the economic jolt, their isolation from locals there more highlights the privilege of these migrants who drastically transform coastal villages. (2018-08-12)

Cooking oil coating prevents bacteria from growing on food processing equipment
Many foods produced on an industrial scale include raw ingredients mixed together in enormous stainless steel machines that can be difficult to clean. The University of Toronto research team proposes a simple new solution: trapping a thin layer of cooking oil at the metal surface to fill in microscopic scrapes, cracks and fissures and create a barrier to bacterial attachment. This solution resulted in a 1,000x reduction in bacterial levels inside the industrial machines tested. (2018-07-27)

Scientists visualize the connections between eye and brain
In a study published in the journal Cell, BIDMC researchers developed a means of tracking the activity of the far-reaching ends of retinal neurons (called boutons) as they deliver visual information to the thalamus, a brain region involved in image processing. (2018-07-02)

Bladder cancer model could pave the way for better drug efficacy studies
In the journal Cancer Research, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers report they have developed a model of luminal bladder cancer, one of the two subtypes of advanced bladder cancer. The researchers said this model may help them to determine which patients may respond to checkpoint inhibitors. (2018-05-21)

Study may explain why some triple-negative breast cancers are resistant to chemotherapy
Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive form of the disease accounting for 12 to 18 percent of breast cancers. It is a scary diagnosis, and even though chemotherapy can be effective as standard-of-care, many patients become resistant to treatment. A team at The University of Texas MD Anderson led a study which may explain how resistance evolves over time, and potentially which patients could benefit from chemotherapy. (2018-04-19)

The microenvironment of diabetic retinopathy supports lymphatic neovascularization
'We asked whether proliferative diabetic retinopathy involves the growth of new lymphatic vessels in addition to blood vessels -- and, indeed, we found expression of lymphatic markers in the PDR tissues.' The new study, conducted at the University of Helsinki, Finland, was published in the Journal of Pathology. (2018-03-29)

Investigating the enigmatic link between periodontal inflammation and retinal degeneration
At the 47th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR), held in conjunction with the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Hyun Hong, The Dental College of Georgia at Augusta University, presented a poster titled 'Investigating the Enigmatic Link Between Periodontal Inflammation and Retinal Degeneration.' The AADR/CADR Annual Meeting is in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., USA from March 21-24, 2018. (2018-03-23)

NUS marine scientists lead comprehensive review of giant clams species worldwide
An international team of marine researchers, led by Dr Neo Mei Lin and Associate Professor Peter Todd from the National University of Singapore, has recently published a comprehensive study on the status of giant clams worldwide. (2017-12-10)

Excavation in Northern Iraq: Sasanian loom discovered
A team of Frankfurt-based archaeologists has returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings. The discovery of a loom from the 5th to 6th century AD in particular caused a stir. (2017-11-06)

Deeper understanding of ISIS propaganda can help in the fight against terrorism
Douglas Wilbur, a retired major in the U.S. Army and a doctoral student in the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri, is continuing the fight against ISIS by studying the Islamic militant organization's propaganda texts and communication strategies. His work could help the military in the fight against terrorism. (2017-10-26)

Archaeologists uncover 3,000-year-old female statue at citadel gate complex in Turkey
The remains of a majestic female statue uncovered at an archaeological site in southeast Turkey may challenge our understanding of the public role of women in the ancient world. Excavations led by University of Toronto archaeologists at a site near the Syrian border have unearthed a beautifully carved head and upper torso of a female figure. The remnants are largely intact, although the face and chest appear to have been intentionally -- possibly ritually -- defaced. (2017-08-10)

Mulling over the aromas of wine
A fine wine has an ideal balance of ingredients. Too much or too little of a component could mean the difference between a wine with a sweet and fruity aroma and one that smells like wet newspaper. To help wineries avoid off-aromas, a team reports in ACS Sensors a sensitive device for detecting a compound that can affect the beverage's fragrance. (2017-07-12)

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