Current Acute Confusional State News and Events

Current Acute Confusional State News and Events, Acute Confusional State News Articles.
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How reducing body temperature could help a tenth of all ICU patients
ROCKVILLE, MD - A tenth of all intensive care unit patients worldwide, and many critical patients with COVID-19, have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (2021-02-23)

COVID-19 associated with leukoencephalopathy on brain MRI
According to an open-access article in ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), COVID-19-related disseminated leukoencephalopathy (CRDL) represents an important--albeit uncommon--differential consideration in patients with neurologic manifestations of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). (2021-02-17)

Researchers find delirium in hospitalized patients linked to mortality, disability
Delirium, a form of acute brain dysfunction, is widespread in critically ill patients in lower resourced hospitals, and the duration of delirium predicted both mortality and disability at six months after discharge, according to a study published in PLOS ONE. (2021-02-11)

Lessons from the flu season
Australian researchers have come up with two key recommendations from studies of the annual influenza season - one highlighting the benefits of antivirals in reducing repeat hospitalisation, and the other to watch for underlying cardiovascular disease. While the world focuses on the rising COVID-19 death toll, seasonal influenza continues to cause significant mortality and poses a significant economic burden every year. (2021-02-10)

Type 2 diabetes: drugs initially increase glucose production
Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are central to the treatment of diabetes, their exact mode of action was hitherto unknown. A study shows that there is a direct correlation between the elimination of glucose via the kidneys and new glucose production in the liver. (2021-02-08)

Study examines role of biomarkers to evaluate kidney injury in cancer patients
A study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in Kidney International Reports finds that immune checkpoint inhibitors, may have negative consequences in some patients, including acute kidney inflammation, known as interstitial nephritis. Immune checkpoint inhibitors are used to treat cancer by stimulating the immune system to attack cancerous cells. (2021-02-03)

Gene mutations linked to worse outcomes from leukemia in Hispanic and Latino children
A combination of genetic mutations may explain the higher incidence of and poorer outcomes from pediatric leukemia in Hispanic and Latino children, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. They said a novel therapeutic drug combination - as well as testing for these mutations - may help address the disparity. (2021-02-02)

International research network identifies triggers for severe course of liver cirrhosis
Acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) is a common cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. In ACLF the progressive loss of function of the scarred liver can no longer be compensated (acute decompensation). As a result, other organs such as the kidney or brain fail. The triggers for acute decompensation of liver cirrhosis and an ACLF are most frequently bacterial infections, liver inflammation caused by alcohol, or a combination of both factors. (2021-02-02)

Early functional SARS-COV-2 specific T cell response may prevent severe infection
Antibodies and T cells are components of the human immune system that directly act against viral infections and eliminate infected cells. A new study by scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School, provides evidence that an early presence of SARS-CoV-2 specific T cells in COVID-19 is likely to prevent severe disease. The study, published in Cell Reports, has important implications for the clinical management of COVID-19 patients. (2021-02-01)

Antarctica's ice melt isn't consistent, new analysis shows
Antarctic ice is melting, contributing massive amounts of water to the world's seas and causing them to rise - but that melt is not as linear and consistent as scientists previously thought, a new analysis of 20 years' worth of satellite data indicates. (2021-02-01)

Robotic exoskeleton training expands options for stroke rehabilitation
Researchers are applying new technologies to gait training that may offer advantages over traditional labor intensive physical therapy. This inpatient study of a robotic exoskeleton (Ekso GT, Ekso Bionics, Inc,) demonstrated the potential to improve gait training after acute stroke toward the goal of earlier recovery of motor function. ''We found that gait training in the exoskeleton allowed us to increase the dose of gait training without increasing the duration of inpatient rehabilitation,'' said Dr. Nolan, (2021-01-29)

New neural network enables easy screening of sleep apnoea in patients with cerebrovascular disease
A new neural network developed by researchers at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital enables an easy and accurate assessment of sleep apnoea severity in patients with cerebrovascular disease. The assessment is automated and based on a simple nocturnal pulse oximetry, making it possible to easily screen for sleep apnoea in stroke units. (2021-01-26)

Life-threatening complications during pregnancy: greater long-term risk of death
A research team from the CHUM Research Centre (CRCHUM) has shown that women who have had serious complications during pregnancy are twice as likely to die up to three decades later. (2021-01-26)

Modified pain management strategy reduces opioid exposure to trauma patients, study shows
A pain management regimen comprised mostly of over-the-counter medication reduced opioid exposure in trauma patients while achieving equal levels of pain control, according to a new study by physician-researchers at UTHealth. (2021-01-21)

Heart attack patients in England 'fearful' of seeking medical help amid COVID crisis
Data analysis is revealing a second sharp drop in the number of people admitted to hospital in England with acute heart failure or a heart attack. The decline began in October, as the numbers of COVID-19 infections began to surge ahead of the second lockdown, which came into force in early November. (2021-01-19)

Acute itching in eczema patients linked to environmental allergens
New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that allergens in the environment often are to blame for episodes of acute itch in eczema patients, and that the itching often doesn't respond to antihistamines because the itch signals are being carried to the brain along a previously unrecognized pathway that current drugs don't target. (2021-01-14)

Large study finds higher burden of acute brain dysfunction for COVID-19 ICU patients
COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care in the early months of the pandemic were subject to a significantly higher burden of delirium and coma than is typically found in patients with acute respiratory failure. Choice of sedative medications and curbs on family visitation played a role in increasing acute brain dysfunction for these patients. (2021-01-08)

IU research findings could reduce treatment-related complication for blood cancer patients
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center published promising findings today in the New England Journal of Medicine on preventing a common complication to lifesaving blood stem cell transplantation in leukemia. (2021-01-07)

COVID-19 infection linked with higher death rate in acute heart failure patients
Patients with acute heart failure nearly double their risk of dying if they get COVID-19, according to research published today in ESC Heart Failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 The small, single centre study highlights the need for patients with heart failure to take extra precautions to avoid catching COVID-19. ''Our results support prioritising heart failure patients for COVID-19 vaccination once it is available,'' said study lead investigator Dr. Amardeep Dastidar. (2021-01-06)

Bedside EEG test can aid prognosis in unresponsive brain injury patients
Assessing the ability of unresponsive patients with severe brain injury to understand what is being said to them could yield important insights into how they might recover, according to new research. (2021-01-05)

Global trial reveals life saving drug for acute myeloid leukemia
Results from a global trial across 148 sites in 23 countries, showing a 30 per cent improvement in survival in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), significantly improving survival in older patients, over the age of 55, with the disease. AML is the most acute blood cancer in adults and its incidence increases with age, with a poor prognosis. (2020-12-23)

Proenkephalin (penKid®) included in the ADQI consensus statements publication as functional kidney biomarker for the management of AKI patients
The Acute Disease Quality Initiative (ADQI) recommends the use of novel biomarkers for AKI management, including functional biomarkers as penKid®. (2020-12-16)

Clowns may help children cope with the pain and anxiety of hospital treatment
Hospital clowns might help improve physical symptoms and psychological wellbeing in children and adolescents having treatment for acute or chronic conditions, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

Point of Care testing can improve the detection and treatment of influenza
Southampton-led research has shown that implementing point-of-care testing in hospitals to diagnose influenza can lead to better treatment and faster recovery for patients. The researchers are now calling for routine use of these tests to become standard for patients admitted with acute respiratory symptoms during the influenza season. (2020-12-14)

Listen to the birds: illegal diet pill DNP might kill you on the long run
DNP, a weight loss agent withdrawn from the market in the late 1930s due to acute toxicity, has become increasingly popular in recent years through online illegal sales. A new study using a lifelong DNP treatment in an avian model found that while no obvious toxic effects were detected on the short to medium-term, DNP reduces lifespan by 20% on the long run. (2020-12-09)

Rutgers reports first instance of COVID-19 triggering recurrent Guillain-Barré Syndrome
Researchers at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School have reported the first instance of COVID-19 triggering a recurrence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome - a rare disorder where the body's immune system attacks nerves and can lead to respiratory failure and death. (2020-12-08)

Kidney injury in diabetic ketoacidosis linked to brain injury
Researchers have identified factors that make children with diabetic ketoacidosis more likely to experience acute kidney injury. Analyzing data from a large, multicenter clinical trial, the researchers also found that children who experience acute kidney injury are more likely to also experience subtle cognitive impairment and demonstrate lower IQ scores, suggesting a pattern of multiple organ injury. (2020-12-04)

How thyroid function affects stress-related heart problems
Chest pain, shortness of breath, heart flutter and palpitations: these symptoms are not only characteristic of a heart attack, but can also be caused by another, as yet little researched condition. So-called Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a rare but life-threatening disease of the heart that can occur during extreme stress events. Heart and hormone research teams in Bochum and Mannheim have now shown that there is apparently a strong link between the occurrence of Takotsubo syndrome and impaired thyroid function in patients. (2020-12-01)

Radboud university medical center research: Most lungs recover well after COVID-19
Lung tissue of patients who suffered severely from COVID-19 shows good recovery in most cases. This was revealed by a study carried out by the Radboud university medical center that has now been published in Clinical Infectious Diseases. A striking conclusion is that the group who was referred by a GP did not recover as well as patients who were admitted to the hospital's Intensive Care Unit (ICU). (2020-11-25)

Home health care improves COVID-19 outcomes
Survivors of COVID-19 are a vulnerable population who often have health ramifications from their illness and hospital stay. Upon returning home from acute care, large proportions of survivors experience functional dependencies, pain, dyspnea, and exhaustion. Until now, no data has been available on the outcomes of COVID-19 patients discharged home after hospitalization and their recovery needs. (2020-11-23)

WeChat group of chest pain center for patients with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0590, Liu Yue, Qin Zhu-Yun, Yang Xin, Tang Rong and Gao Ling-Yun from the The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China consider the use of a social media platform (WeChat) to provide faster treatment and improve prognoses for a group of patients with acute ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction. (2020-11-19)

The challenges of treating acute myocardial infarction due to variant angina
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1262, Wen-Yuan Ding, Jia-Min Li, Fei Zheng, Li-Li Wang, Xin-Yi Wei and Guo-Hua Li from Shandong Provincial Qianfoshan Hospital, Ji'nan, China, Affiliated Hospital of Shandong University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Ji'nan, China and Shandong First Medical University, Tai'an, China consider the challenges of treating acute myocardial infarction due to variant angina. (2020-11-19)

The long road to dementia
Alzheimer's disease develops over decades. It begins with a fatal chain reaction in which masses of misfolded beta-amyloid proteins are produced that in the end literally flood the brain. Researchers from the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases show in the journal Nature Neuroscience that this chain reaction starts much earlier in mice than commonly assumed. (2020-11-17)

Cleveland Clinic led trial shows drug effective in 96% of patients with recurrent pericarditis
Cleveland: Cleveland Clinic researchers leading a global clinical trial have found that rilonacept, an FDA approved drug for other inflammatory diseases, resolved acute pericarditis episodes and reduced risk of pericarditis recurrence. The study was published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions. (2020-11-16)

Best practices for mechanical ventilation in patients with ARDS, COVID-19
A team from pulmonary and critical care medicine at Michigan Medicine outlines 20 evidence-based practices shown to reduce time spent on a ventilator and death in patients with acute respiratory failure and acute respiratory distress -- conditions that have many overlaps with severe COVID-19. (2020-11-13)

Rats also capable of transmitting hantavirus
A group of researchers from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin have confirmed Germany's first-ever case of animal-to-human transmission involving a specific species of virus known as the 'Seoul virus'. Working alongside colleagues from Friedrich-Loeffer-Institut (FLI), the researchers were able to confirm the presence of the virus in a young female patient and her pet rat. (2020-11-12)

Tracking down the causes of heart attack
Heart attacks strike suddenly and have a range of different triggers. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) were able to uncover a further underlying cause. Studying arterial deposits (plaque) in patients with acute coronary syndrome, the researchers found that, in some patients, these were characterized by activated immune cells which, as a result of altered flow conditions within the vessel, had accumulated on the interior arterial wall, causing damage to the arterial lining. (2020-11-10)

Six ways primary care "medical homes" are lowering health care spending
New analysis of 394 U.S. primary care practices identifies the aspects of care delivery that are associated with lower health care spending and lower utilization of emergency care and hospital admissions. (2020-11-10)

Delirium could be an early marker of COVID-19
Delirium accompanied by fever could be an early symptom of COVID-19. This is the main conclusion drawn by a scientific research review carried out by researchers from the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and published in the open access Journal of Clinical Immunology and Immunotherapy, which highlights the fact that, together with the loss of the senses of taste and smell and headaches that occur in the days prior to the manifestation of coughing and breathing difficulties, some patients also develop delirium. (2020-11-04)

'BAH-code' reader senses gene-silencing tag in cells
UNC Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and colleagues have identified an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for ''closing down'' gene activity in the mammalian cell. The finding is closely related to the Polycomb pathway defined decades ago by a set of classic genetic experiments carried out in fruit flies. They repor the BAHCC1 protein is critically involved in silencing genes and acts as an integral component of the Polycomb gene-repressive pathway in mammalian cells. (2020-11-02)

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