Current Adenovirus News and Events

Current Adenovirus News and Events, Adenovirus News Articles.
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Intranasal influenza vaccine spurs strong immune response in Phase 1 study
An experimental single-dose, intranasal influenza vaccine was safe and produced a durable immune response when tested in a Phase 1 study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. The investigational vaccine, called Ad4-H5-VTN, is a recombinant, replicating adenovirus vaccine designed to spur antibodies to hemagglutinin, a protein found on the surface of influenza viruses that attaches to human cells. (2021-02-03)

The Lancet: Study reports preliminary efficacy and safety results from interim analysis of Russian COVID-19 phase 3 vaccine trial
An interim analysis of data from the phase 3 trial of the COVID-19 vaccine from Russia (Gam-COVID-Vac) suggests that a two-dose regimen of the adenovirus-based vaccine offers 91.6% efficacy against symptomatic COVID-19. The preliminary findings, published in The Lancet, are based on analysis of data from nearly 20,000 participants, three-quarters of whom received the vaccine and one quarter received a placebo. (2021-02-02)

Physical virology shows the dynamics of virus reproduction
The reproductive cycle of viruses requires self-assembly, maturation of virus particles and, after infection, the release of genetic material into a host cell. New physics-based technologies allow scientists to study the dynamics of this cycle and may eventually lead to new treatments. (2021-01-14)

Breakthrough on diarrhea virus opens up for new vaccines
Researchers at Umeå University in Sweden have for the first time at the atomic level succeeded in mapping what a virus looks like that causes diarrhea and annually kills about 50,000 children in the world. The discovery may in the long run provide the opportunity for completely new types of treatments for other viral diseases such as COVID-19. (2021-01-11)

Gene therapy for placental insufficiency moves toward the clinic
A new study identified an adenovirus gene therapy vector carrying a VEGF isoform. It can improve uterine blood flow in placental insufficiency. (2020-12-15)

Engineered "stealth bomber" virus could be new weapon against metastatic cancer
Researchers at Emory and Case Western Reserve have re-engineered an oncolytic adenovirus. The resulting virus is not easily caught by parts of the innate immune system, making systemic delivery possible without arousing a massive inflammatory reaction. (2020-11-25)

The Lancet: Preliminary results from Russian trials of vaccine candidates reported
Preliminary results from Russian trials find that vaccine candidates led to no serious adverse events and elicit antibody response (2020-09-04)

The Lancet: Preliminary results from Russian trials find that vaccine candidates led to no serious adverse events and elicit antibody response
Results from two early-phase Russian non-randomised vaccine trials (Sputnik V) in a total of 76 people are published today in The Lancet, finding that two formulations of a two-part vaccine have a good safety profile with no serious adverse events detected over 42 days, and induce antibody responses in all participants within 21 days. (2020-09-04)

Small change makes cancer vaccine more effective in animal tests
Tweaking the adenovirus spike protein induces a more robust immune reaction for a cancer vaccine against gastric, pancreatic, esophageal and colon malignancies in animal models. (2020-08-24)

Nasal vaccine against COVID-19 prevents infection in mice
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a vaccine that targets the SARS-CoV-2 virus, can be given in one dose via the nose and is effective in preventing infection in mice susceptible to the novel coronavirus. The investigators next plan to test the vaccine in nonhuman primates and humans to see if it is safe and effective in preventing COVID-19 infection. (2020-08-21)

Targeting a conserved cell pathway may offer treatments for numerous viruses, including SARS-CoV-2
Scientists have identified a small molecule that inhibits multiple different viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, in tissue culture and in mice by targeting the same signaling pathway. By identifying a host cell pathway that a wide variety of viruses rely on for successful infection, the findings suggest a possible target for broad-spectrum antiviral drugs. (2020-08-14)

The Lancet: UK's vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 is safe and induces an immune reaction
UK's vaccine against SARS-CoV-2 is safe and induces an immune reaction, according to preliminary results. (2020-07-20)

The Lancet: Chinese phase 2 trial finds vaccine is safe and induces an immune response
Chinese phase 2 trial finds vaccine is safe and induces an immune response. (2020-07-20)

Invisible defence against adenoviruses
An adenovirus infection can be potentially life-threatening, especially for children after a stem cell transplant. Virologists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Research Center for Environmental Health Helmholtz Zentrum München have successfully shown that a previously approved medication used in cancer treatment could help inhibit this virus infection. Due to the special mechanism of action, the virus cannot develop defence strategies. (2020-07-13)

Virginia Tech scientists confirm usually harmless virus attacks the heart's electrical system
Virginia Tech researchers studying how a usually benign virus attacks the human heart with sometimes fatal consequences determined that the virus disrupts the heart's electrical system -- and with dual impacts not previously recognized. (2020-06-22)

COVID-19 mouse model will speed search for drugs, vaccines
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a mouse model of COVID-19 that is expected to speed up the search for drugs and vaccines for the potentially deadly disease. (2020-06-10)

Exploiting viruses to attack cancer cells
Hokkaido University scientists have made an adenovirus that specifically replicates inside and kills cancer cells by employing special RNA-stabilizing elements. The details of the research were published in the journal Cancers. (2020-05-28)

The Lancet: First human trial of COVID-19 vaccine finds it is safe and induces rapid immune response
The Lancet: First human trial of COVID-19 vaccine finds it is safe and induces rapid immune response. (2020-05-22)

Pitt researchers create durable, washable textile coating that can repel viruses
Research from the LAMP Lab at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering has created a textile coating that can not only repel liquids like blood and saliva but can also prevent viruses from adhering to the surface. The work was recently published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. (2020-05-13)

Researchers develop new microneedle array combination vaccine delivery system
In parallel to their current work on a potential coronavirus vaccine, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have developed a new vaccine delivery system for vaccines using live or attenuated viral vectors: a finger-tip sized patch that contains 400 tiny needles, each just half of one millimeter. Their progress is reported in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology, published by Elsevier. (2020-04-21)

Wuhan CT scans reliable for coronavirus (COVID-19) diagnosis, limited for differentiation
An American Journal of Roentgenology open-access article by radiologists from Wuhan, China concluded that chest CT had a low rate of misdiagnosis of COVID-19 (3.9%, 2/51) and could help standardize imaging features and rules of transformation for rapid diagnosis; however, CT remains limited for the identification of specific viruses and distinguishing between viruses. The authors also found CT features of COVID-19 that differ from both severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome. (2020-03-05)

Mayo clinic researchers test novel injection of gene therapy vectors into the kidney
Before gene therapy can be used to treat renal diseases, delivery of therapeutic genes to the kidney must become much more efficient. (2019-12-31)

Unexpected viral behavior linked to type 1 diabetes in high-risk children
New results from the Environmental Determinants of Diabetes in the Young (TEDDY) study show an association between prolonged enterovirus infection and development of autoimmunity to the insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells that precedes type 1 diabetes. Conversely, adenovirus C infection seems to confer protection from autoimmunity. The international research suggests new therapeutic avenues for prevention in some children. (2019-12-02)

Delivering large genes to the retina is problematic
A new study has shown that a commonly used vector for large gene transfer can success-fully deliver genes to retinal cells in the laboratory, but when injected subretinally into rats it provokes a robust and acute inflammatory response. (2019-11-12)

Researchers discover 4 new strains of human adenovirus
Large-scale study to identify human adenovirus genotypes in Singapore leads to discovery of four new adenovirus strains and increase in strains linked to severe diseases. Researchers suggest use of antiviral therapies and adenovirus vaccines, and routine monitoring of adenovirus strains. (2019-10-24)

Self-sterilizing polymer proves effective against drug-resistant pathogens
Researchers have found an elastic polymer that possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties, allowing it to kill a range of viruses and drug-resistant bacteria in just minutes - including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). (2019-08-01)

Researchers identify a protein that protects against non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Work headed by scientist Antonio Zorzano proposes a possible therapeutic target to treat fatty liver, a disease for which there is currently no treatment. The study, which was done in collaboration with the Pere Virgili Institute, has been published in the journal Cell. (2019-05-03)

Combo of virotherapy and radiotherapy shows early promise in patients with esophageal cancer
The experimental oncolytic adenovirus telomelysin (OBP-301) in combination with radiotherapy was safe and showed early clinical efficacy in vulnerable patients with esophageal cancer, according to results from a phase I clinical trial presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3. (2019-04-02)

Seeing the unseeable
Researchers at Cardiff University have used X-ray crystallography and computer simulation to get a closer look at how viruses bind cells and cause infection. (2019-02-19)

Common virus in early childhood linked to celiac disease in susceptible children
A common intestinal virus, enterovirus, in early childhood may be a trigger for later celiac disease in children at increased genetic risk of the condition, finds a small study published in The BMJ today. (2019-02-13)

Engineering a cancer-fighting virus
An engineered virus kills cancer cells more effectively than another virus currently used in treatments, according to Hokkaido University researchers. (2019-01-29)

Nebraska virologists discover safer potential Zika vaccine
In mouse trials, a vaccine based on recombinant Adenovirus protected against Zika without evidence of antibodies. Reports have shown Zika antibodies can worsen Dengue virus infection. (2018-12-20)

Llama-derived antibodies provide universal flu protection
Researchers have generated a new anti-flu antibody that demonstrates long-lasting and universal protection from a wide variety of influenza A and B viruses, including avian-borne strains like H1N1. (2018-11-01)

Guided by CRISPR, prenatal gene editing shows proof-of-concept in treating disease before birth
For the first time, scientists have performed prenatal gene editing to prevent a lethal metabolic disorder in laboratory animals, offering the potential to treat human congenital diseases before birth. Published today in Nature Medicine, research from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania offers proof-of-concept for prenatal use of a sophisticated, low-toxicity tool that efficiently edits DNA building blocks in disease-causing genes. (2018-10-08)

Guided by CRISPR, prenatal gene editing used in treating congenital disease before birth
For the first time, scientists have performed prenatal gene editing to prevent a lethal metabolic disorder in laboratory animals, offering the potential to treat human congenital diseases before birth. (2018-10-08)

New cancer vaccine shows early promise for patients with HER2-positive cancers
Treatment with a HER2-targeted therapeutic cancer vaccine provided clinical benefit to several patients with metastatic HER2-positive cancers who had not previously been treated with a HER2-targeted therapeutic, according to data from a phase I clinical trial presented at the Fourth CRI-CIMT-EATI-AACR International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference: Translating Science into Survival, held Sept. 30-Oct. 3. (2018-09-30)

Treatment of cancer could become possible with adenovirus
An international team of researchers led by professor Niklas Arnberg at Umeå University, shows that adenovirus binds to a specific type of carbohydrate that is overexpressed on certain types of cancer cells. The discovery opens up new opportunities for the development of virus-based cancer therapy. The study is published in the latest issue of the scientific journal (2018-04-20)

New insight about how viruses use host proteins to their advantage
Viruses have a very limited set of genes and therefore must use the cellular machineries of their hosts for most parts of their growth. A new study, led by scientists at Uppsala University, has discovered a specific host protein that many viruses use for their transport within the cell. The discovery opens up new possibilities to develop a broad spectrum anti-viral therapy. The paper is published this week in PNAS. (2018-04-02)

Stealth virus for cancer therapy
Scientists from the University of Zurich have redesigned an adenovirus for use in cancer therapy. To achieve this they developed a new protein shield that hides the virus and protects it from being eliminated. Adapters on the surface of the virus enable the reconstructed virus to specifically infect tumor cells. (2018-01-31)

Developing a new vaccination strategy against AIDS
Infection researchers from the German Primate Center (DPZ) -- Leibniz Institute for Primate Research have in cooperation with international colleagues tested a new vaccination strategy against the HIV-related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rhesus monkeys. For this, the researchers used a vaccine that consisted of two components. (2017-11-15)

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