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UConn researcher offers lessons learned from a pre-pandemic study of telemedicine use
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has become a new norm for many routine and non-emergency medical needs. But there are lessons to be learned from telemedicine's use - or lack thereof - prior to the pandemic, and a new study from a UConn School of Social Work researcher offers insight for policymakers, administrators, and public health officials when considering the implementation of new services. (2021-02-22)

New method converts methane in natural gas to methanol at room temperature
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have discovered a way to convert the methane in natural gas into liquid methanol at room temperature. (2021-02-18)

Vibrating 2D materials
Two-dimensional materials hold out hope for many technical applications. An international research team now has determined for the first time how strongly 2D materials vibrate when electronically excited with light. (2021-02-11)

Sonoporation: Underlying mechanisms and applications in cellular regulation
Sonoporation: Underlying Mechanisms and Applications in Cellular Regulation https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0028 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors Yue Li, Zhiyi Chen and Shuping Ge from First Affiliated Hospital of University of South China, Hengyang, China and Tower Health and Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA summarize current state of the art applications of microbubble-cell interactions and sonoporation effects to cellular functions. (2021-02-09)

Nanocarriers in the enhancement of therapeutic efficacy of natural drugs
https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0040 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors Xiuling Li, Shunung Liang, Chee Hwee Tan, Shuwen Cao, Xiaoding Xu, Phei Er Saw and Wei Tao from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, China and Center for Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA discuss the potential benefits of four plants endogenous to China and the enhancement of their therapeutic efficacy by nanotechnology intervention. (2021-02-09)

How metal atoms can arrange themselves on an insulator
In order to produce tiny electronic memories or sensors in future, it is essential to be able to arrange individual metal atoms on an insulating layer. Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Chemistry have now demonstrated that this is possible at room temperature: molecules of the metal-containing compound molybdenum acetate form an ordered structure on the insulator calcite without jumping to other positions or rotating. Their findings have been presented in the Nature Communications journal. (2021-02-04)

A fine-grained view of dust storms
A new analysis of satellite data gives a detailed view of how extreme dust events have changed over time. (2021-02-02)

Care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement at heart of improving access to care
The American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Summit will feature several poster presentations on care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement that offer innovative concepts to combat access to care, especially during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and as the broader health care system works to improve health equity. Research examines the rapid adoption of virtual outpatient care, enabling rural primary care teams to improve cardiovascular health and optimizing emergency room use after clinic hours. (2021-02-01)

New catalyst moves seawater desalination, hydrogen production closer to commercialization
Seawater is abundant and cheap, making it a tempting resource to meet the world's growing need for clean drinking water and carbon-free energy. Now researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new catalyst that can be made quickly and inexpensively, bringing the technology closer to commercial reality. (2021-01-28)

CT imaging features of patients infected with 2019 novel coronavirus
CT Imaging Features of Patients Infected with 2019 Novel Coronavirus https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0038 Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this opinion article the authors Tianhong Yao, Huirong Lin, Jingsong Mao, Shuaidong Huo and Gang Liu from Xiamen University, Xiamen, China discuss CT imaging features of patients infected with 2019 novel coronavirus. (2021-01-26)

Curtin find could slash energy use and cost in making silicon
Curtin University researchers have uncovered a method of making silicon, found commonly in electronics such as phones, cameras and computers, at room temperature. (2021-01-20)

Sensei RNA: Iron fist in a velvet glove
Scientific pursuit has the habit of offering chance discoveries if we think about things differently. Here is a story behind one serendipitous discovery from the lab of Arati Ramesh at NCBS, Bangalore. (2021-01-18)

Modulating helical nanostructures in liquid crystal phase by molecular design
Toyohashi University of Technology has successfully developed sulfur-containing liquid crystal (LC) dimer molecules, which exhibit a helical liquid crystal phase, over a wide temperature range. It is that the ester bond direction in the molecular structures largely impacts the pitch lengths of helical nanostructures in the NTB phase. It is expected that this molecular design can be used to tune the resultant physical properties of LC materials that would contribute to new LC technologies. (2021-01-18)

Tetris is no longer just a game, but an algorithm, which ensures maximum room occupancy
The software was developed by the University of Trento. It is a new and revolutionary method to manage the accommodation of guests in hotel. RoomTetris finds the best solution, the ideal combination between demand and supply, optimizing room occupancy. A tile-matching game that no human mind, no matter how experienced and skilled, could do better, with the seriousness and scientific rigor of a mathematical demonstration (2021-01-14)

Scientists have synthesized an unusual superconducting barium superhydride
A new exotic compound, BaH12, has been discovered by experiment and theory. Unusually, it is a molecular metal and demonstrates the superconducting transition around 20?K at 140?GPa (2021-01-12)

Disposable helmet retains cough droplets, minimizes transmission to dentists
Dentists and otolaryngologists are at particular risk of infection of COVID-19, since they need direct access to the mouth, nose, and throat of patients. The current solutions are expensive, not highly effective, and not very accessible. In Physics of Fluids, researchers discuss their design of an open-faced helmet that is connected to a medical-grade air filtration pump from the top that creates a reverse flow of air to prevent cough droplets from exiting the helmet. (2021-01-12)

Ferroptosis resistance in cancer: An emerging crisis of new hope
Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this opinion article the authors Daiyun Xu, Yonghui Lü, Yongxiao Li, Shengbin Li, Zhe Wang and Junqing Wang from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China discuss ferroptosis resistance in cancer. (2021-01-08)

An epidemic of overdiagnosis: Melanoma diagnoses sky rocket
In a Sounding Board article, Welch and colleagues present evidence for why they believe that increased diagnostic scrutiny is the primary driver of the rapid rise in melanoma diagnoses. (2021-01-06)

2D CaCl crystals with +1 calcium ions displaying unexpected metallicity and ferromagnetism
Counter to conventional wisdom that the only valence state of Ca ions under ambient conditions is +2 and corresponding crystals are insulating and nonferromagnetic, scientists in China made exciting discoveries of two-dimensional CaCl crystals with +1 calcium ions, which have unexpected metallicity, room-temperature ferromagnetism, heterojunction, piezoelectricity-like property, and distinct hydrogen storage and release capability, showing great potential applications of such abnormal material in designing novel electric and magnetic devices with a size down to atomic scale. (2021-01-05)

How our brains track where we and others go
As COVID cases rise, physically distancing yourself from other people has never been more important. Now a new UCLA study reveals how your brain navigates places and monitors someone else in the same location. (2020-12-23)

Metabolic syndrome 'interacts' with COVID-19
Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this review article the authors Zeling Guo, Shanping Jiang, Zilun Li and Sifan Chen from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China review how metabolic syndrome 'interacts' with COVID-19. (2020-12-23)

Understanding nanoparticle entry mechanism into tumors
Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this commentary the authors Phei Er Saw and Sangyong Jon from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea, consider how the entry mechanism of nanoparticles into tumors determines the future direction of nanomedicine development. (2020-12-23)

Sounds, smells could sway our self-image
A lemony scent and light sounds could change the way you feel about yourself. Previously, researchers have shown that visual and tactile stimulation can change a person's perception of their own body weight. Research being presented by Giada Brianza at the 179th ASA Meeting, has found our hearing and sense of smell can also change how we feel about our self-image, which could help improve healthy behaviors. (2020-12-11)

A day at the beach helps model how sound moves through coastal areas
At a North Carolina beach, researchers have been poking and prodding the sand to study how moisture levels affect sounds as they move across the environment. Over short distances, even moderately wet sand reflects sound more like water does than as a solid surface does. Faith Cobb and her team are looking into if the same is true for long-range sound propagation. Their findings will be presented as a part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-10)

Lung ultrasounds could help determine COVID-19 outcome
Researchers have developed a method using ultrasound imaging to score a patient's lung health, which may help predict if a patient with COVID-19 will worsen. Using 14 points in the lungs, they looked for abnormalities and assigned each spot a score out of 3 based on its severity. Adding up all the points, the researchers found the total lung ultrasound score was higher for those who had a worsening outcome of COVID-19. (2020-12-10)

How loud is too loud? Identifying noise levels that deter older restaurant patrons
As restaurants get noisier, the increasing noise levels could deter older patrons, especially those with mild to severe hearing loss. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will discuss their work on investigating acceptable noise levels that won't cause restaurant visitors to stay away from certain establishments. Identifying acceptable noise levels helps establish truly ''age-friendly'' communities. The session will take place as part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-10)

Hearing tones, elements through atomic music
With each atom assigned a tonal signature based on its spectral signature, music can be a powerful tool for helping students understand atomic structure. Jill Linz is working toward synthesizing unique tones for each element to create an acoustic version of the periodic table. She will discuss her progress and the potential applications of the project at the 179th ASA Meeting, Dec. 7-10. (2020-12-10)

How much does the way you speak reveal about you?
Listeners can extract a lot of information about a person from their acoustic speech signal. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Dec. 7-10, Tessa Bent, Emerson Wolff, and Jennifer Lentz will describe their study in which listeners were told to categorize 144 unique audio clips of monolingual English talkers into Midland, New York City, and Southern U.S. dialect regions, and Asian American, Black/African American, or white speakers. (2020-12-10)

Self-collected saliva samples prove effective for diagnosing COVID-19
Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) have found that SARS-CoV-2 genetic material can be reliably detected in self-collected saliva samples at a rate similar to that of nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs. The rate of detection using saliva samples was similar across different testing platforms, and saliva samples remained stable for up to 24 hours when stored with ice packs or at room temperature, according to a new study in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics. (2020-12-10)

How does eye position affect 'cocktail party' listening?
Several acoustic studies have shown that the position of your eyes determines where your visual spatial attention is directed, which automatically influences your auditory spatial attention. Researchers are currently exploring its impact on speech intelligibility. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Virginia Best will describe her work to determine whether there is a measurable effect of eye position within cocktail party listening situations. (2020-12-09)

Noninvasive way to explore traumatic brain injuries
A noninvasive method to measure the stiffness parameters along fibrous pathways within the brain is helping researchers explore traumatic brain injuries. The stiffness of these tissues can reveal clues about changes and pathologies within the brain's gray and white matter. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Anthony J. Romano will describe the method known as waveguide elastography. Waveguide elastography merges magnetic resonance elastography and diffusion tensor imaging with a combination of isotropic and anisotropic inversion algorithms. (2020-12-09)

Accent perception depends on backgrounds of speaker, listener
Visual cues can change listeners' perception of others' accents, and people's past exposure to varied speech can also impact their perception of accents. Ethan Kutlu will discuss his team's work testing the impact that visual input and linguistic diversity has on listeners' perceived accentedness judgments in two different locations: Gainesville, Florida, and Montreal, Canada. The session will take place Dec. 9 as part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-09)

Getting to the bottom of Arctic landslides
Erosion of the frozen soil of Arctic regions, known as permafrost, is creating large areas of subsidence, which has catastrophic impact in these regions sensitive to climate change. As the mechanisms behind these geological events are poorly understood, researchers from the Géosciences Paris Sud laboratory (CNRS / Université Paris-Saclay), in cooperation with the Melnikov Permafrost Institute in Yakutsk, Russia, conducted a cold room simulation of landslides, or slumps, caused by accelerated breakdown of the permafrost. (2020-12-08)

Coronavirus pneumonia and pulmonary thromboembolism
Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this article the authors Mingkang Yao; Phei Er Saw and Shanping Jiang from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China review Coronavirus Pneumonia and Pulmonary Thromboembolism. (2020-12-08)

Delivering sound to people where they want it for VR, AR
What if a commercial audio speaker could function like an autozoom projector does for light, and you could deliver the sound people want where they want it? Chinmay Rajguru, from the University of Sussex, will discuss his research team's work creating a sound projector that can deliver spatial sound at a distance by forming a beam of audible sound at the 179th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Dec. 7-10, 2020. (2020-12-08)

Smarter traffic signs ahead?
Researchers in Poland have created smart road signs that use built-in Doppler radar, video, and acoustic radar and weather stations to monitor road traffic and conditions to warn drivers in real-time of hazards and prevent collisions on highways. During the 179th ASA Meeting, Dec. 7-10, Andrzej Czyzewski will describe his applied research project to develop autonomous road signs with built-in acoustic radar devices. (2020-12-07)

Imitation mosquito ears help identify mosquito species and sex
Using an imitation ''ear'' modeled on the organs that mosquitos use to hear, researchers have identified a mosquito's species and sex using sound -- just like mosquitos do themselves. The researchers hope this bioinspired detector could someday be used in the field to save lives by aiding in more selective pesticide use and possibly preventing mosquitos from mating. A presentation of the new research will be given as part of the 179th ASA Meeting. (2020-12-07)

Outside Oz, GLINDA reports on tornado acoustics
During tornado formation, sound waves are produced at very low frequencies. And if your name is GLINDA, you do not need to be in Oz to hear them. Brandon White, at Oklahoma State University, is part of an engineering team that developed the Ground-based Local Infrasound Data Acquisition (GLINDA) system for the acoustic measurement of weather phenomena. He will discuss its design and capabilities at the 179th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America. (2020-12-07)

Researchers call for renewed focus on thermoelectric cooling
Almost 200 years after French physicist Jean Peltier discovered that electric current flowing through the junction of two different metals could be used to produce a heating or cooling effect, researchers say it is time to step up efforts to find new materials for the thermoelectric cooling market. (2020-12-07)

Experimental study on the viscoelastic flow mixing in microfluidics
Experimental Study on the Viscoelastic Flow Mixing in Microfluidics https://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0029 Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this article the authors Meng Zhang, Wu Zhang, Zihuang Wang and Weiqian Chen from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA and Guangzhou University, Guangzhou, China review viscoelastic flow mixing in microfluidics. (2020-12-03)

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