Current Advances News and Events

Current Advances News and Events, Advances News Articles.
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Cancer research expands body's own immune system to kill tumors
Scientists are hoping advances in cancer research could lead to a day when a patient's own immune system could be used to fight and destroy a wide range of tumors. Cancer immunotherapy has some remarkable successes, but its effectiveness has been limited to a relatively small handful of cancers. In APL Bioengineering, researchers describe how advances in engineering models of tumors can greatly expand cancer immunotherapy's effectiveness to a wider range of cancers. (2021-02-02)

Better bundled: new principle for generating X-rays
X-rays are usually difficult to direct and guide. X-ray physicists at the University of Göttingen have developed a new method with which the X-rays can be emitted more precisely in one direction. To do this, the scientists use a structure of thin layers of materials with different densities of electrons to simultaneously deflect and focus the generated beams. The results of the study were published in the journal Science Advances. (2021-01-25)

DNA origami enables fabricating superconducting nanowires
In AIP Advances, researchers describe how to exploit DNA origami as a platform to build superconducting nanoarchitectures. The structures they built are addressable with nanometric precision that can be used as a template for 3D architectures that are not possible today via conventional fabrication techniques. Inspired by previous works using the DNA molecule as a template for superconducting nanowires, the group took advantage of a recent bioengineering advance known as DNA origami. (2021-01-19)

New findings from OSIRIS-REx detail complex history of Asteroid Bennu
Six new studies in Science and Science Advances present results from the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft and reveal insights about the near-Earth asteroid Bennu. (2020-10-08)

Inducing plasma in biomass could make biogas easier to produce
Producing biogas from the bacterial breakdown of biomass presents options for a greener energy future, but the complex composition of biomass comes with challenges. Cellulose and woody lignocellulose are especially hard for bacteria to digest but pretreatment can make it easier. Researchers are testing plasma formation in biomass and finding a promising method: A plasma-liquid interaction forms reactive species that help break down the biomass and decrease the viscosity of the biomass material. (2020-09-22)

Humans, not climate, have driven rapidly rising mammal extinction rate
Human impact can explain ninety-six percent of all mammal species extinctions of the last hundred thousand years, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Science Advances. (2020-09-09)

Fossil trees on Peru's Central Andean Plateau tell a tale of dramatic environmental change
The anatomy of plant fossils including an enormous tree that grew 10 million years ago in the now arid, high-elevation Central Andean Plateau calls current paleoclimate models into question, suggesting that the area was more humid than models predict. (2020-08-28)

Digital content on track to equal half Earth's mass by 2245
As we use resources to power massive computer farms and process digital information, our technological progress is redistributing Earth's matter from physical atoms to digital information. Eventually, we will reach a point of full saturation, a period in our evolution in which digital bits will outnumber atoms on Earth, a world ''mostly computer simulated and dominated by digital bits and computer code,'' according to an article published in AIP Advances. (2020-08-11)

Nanostructures modeled on moth eyes effective for anti-icing
Researchers have been working for decades on improving the anti-icing performance of functional surfaces and work published in AIP Advances investigates a unique nanostructure, modeled on moth eyes, that has anti-icing properties. Moth eyes are of interest because they have a distinct ice-phobic and transparent surface. The researchers fabricated the moth eye nanostructure on a quartz substrate that was covered with a paraffin layer to isolate it from a cold and humid environment. (2020-08-04)

The problem with microwaving tea
Through convection, as the liquid toward the bottom of a container warms up, it becomes less dense and moves to the top, allowing a cooler section of the liquid to contact the heating source. This ultimately results in a uniform temperature. Inside a microwave, however, the electric field acting as the heating source exists everywhere and the convection process does not occur. Researchers studied this nonuniform heating behavior and present a solution in AIP Advances. (2020-08-04)

Surrey's simplified circuit design could revolutionise how wearables are manufactured
Researchers have demonstrated the use of a ground-breaking circuit design that could transform manufacturing processes for wearable technology. (2020-08-03)

Satellites have drastically changed how we forecast hurricanes
The powerful hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas on September 8, 1900, killing an estimated 8,000 people and destroying more than 3,600 buildings, took the coastal city by surprise. (2020-06-22)

Promising new method for producing tiny liquid capsules
Microcapsules for the storage and delivery of substances are tiny versions of the type of capsule used for fish oil or other liquid supplements. A new method for synthesizing microcapsules, reported in AIP Advances, creates microcapsules with a liquid core that are ideal for the storage and delivery of oil-based materials in skin care products. They also show promise in some applications as tiny bioreactors. In this new method, a surfactant-free microfluidics process is used. (2020-06-02)

Fossil fuel-free jet propulsion with air plasmas
Humans depend on fossil fuels as their primary energy source, especially in transportation. However, fossil fuels are both unsustainable and unsafe, serving as the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. Researchers in China have demonstrated a prototype device that uses microwave air plasmas for jet propulsion, generating the high-temperature, high-pressure plasma in situ using only injected air and electricity. They describe the engine in AIP Advances. (2020-05-05)

Clinically-applicable math model predicts patient outcomes to cancer immunotherapy
A group of our cancer and mathematics researchers at Houston Methodist have developed a clinically-applicable mathematical model to predict patient outcomes to cancer immunotherapy. (2020-04-30)

COVID-19 personal protective equipment causes serious skin injuries
A new study of medical staff treating COVID-19-infected patients found 42.8% experienced serious skin injury related to the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), including masks, goggles, face shields, and protective gowns. (2020-04-30)

Case study: Treating COVID-19 in a patient with multiple myeloma
A case study of a patient in Wuhan, China, suggests that the immunosuppressant tocilizumab may be an effective COVID-19 treatment for very ill patients who also have multiple myeloma and other blood cancers. The report, published in Blood Advances, also suggests that blood cancer patients may have atypical COVID-19 symptoms. (2020-04-03)

Understanding differences in streptavidin-biotin binding
Beckman research scientist Rafael C. Bernardi recently published a paper that uses computational tools to explain the mechanism of how streptavidin and biotin binding is affected by streptavidin's tethering. The results were published in Science Advances. (2020-03-25)

New study: National monuments can boost the economy in the American West
A groundbreaking study by Resources for the Future researchers, published in Science Advances, shows that national monuments have had mostly positive effects on local economies in the American West. Using a unique set of data and state-of-the-art statistical methods, the authors determined how 14 monument designations in the Mountain West states affected nearby jobs, wage income, businesses, and industries. (2020-03-18)

Seeking better guidelines for inventorying greenhouse gas emissions
Governments around the world are striving to hit reduction targets using Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines to limit global warming. Yale researchers say those guidelines are ''woefully out of date'' and in need of improvement. (2020-01-31)

Smaller detection device effective for nuclear treaty verification, archaeology digs
Most nuclear data measurements are performed at accelerators large enough to occupy a geologic formation a kilometer wide. But a portable device that can reveal the composition of materials quickly on-site would greatly benefit cases such as in archaeology and nuclear arms treaty verification. Research published this week used computational simulations to show that with the right geometric adjustments, it is possible to perform neutron resonance transmission analysis in a device just 5 meters long. (2020-01-29)

New Phytopathology journal focus issue emphasizes virological advances
Given the importance of and rapid research progress in plant virology in recent years, Phytopathology emphasized virological advances in its Fundamental Aspects of Plant Viruses focus issue, which is available now. (2020-01-08)

Reflecting on the year in chemistry
A lot can happen in a year, especially when it comes to science. As 2019 draws to a close, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, is highlighting the year's biggest stories in chemistry, top research trends and important developments in a special issue. In addition, the magazine makes some bold predictions for chemistry in 2020. (2019-12-18)

IADR's Women Pioneers: Celebrating a Century of Achievement published in Advances in Dental Research
The latest issue of Advances in Dental Research, an e-Supplement to the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), 'IADR's Women Pioneers: Celebrating a Century of Achievement' highlights the history of the tremendous advancements in dental research made by women, while also identifying areas where the profession needs to continue to grow to be more inclusive in the promotion of women scientific innovators. (2019-11-20)

Environmental pollution in China begins decreasing
For decades pollution in China has paralleled economic growth. But this connection has been weakened in recent years, according to a new international research study published in the Science Advances journal. (2019-09-13)

Separate polarization and brightness channels give crabs the edge over predators
Fiddler crabs see the polarization of light and this gives them the edge when it comes to spotting potentials threats, such as a rival crab or a predator. Now researchers at the University of Bristol have begun to unravel how this information is processed within the crab's brain. The study, published in Science Advances today, has discovered that when detecting approaching objects, fiddler crabs separate polarization and brightness information. (2019-08-21)

Scientists develop way to perform supercomputer simulations of the heart on cellphones
You can now perform supercomputer simulations of the heart's electrophysiology in real time on desktop computers and even cellphones. A team of scientists from Rochester Institute of Technology and Georgia Tech developed a new approach that can not only help diagnose heart conditions and test new treatments, but pushes the boundaries of cardiac science by opening up a floodgate of new cardiac research and education. (2019-03-29)

Spring migration is now earlier in European and North American birds
According to a new study, migratory birds in Europe and Canada have substantially advanced the timing of their spring migration due to climate change. The average migratory bird has advanced its spring migration by approximately one week in five decades, and the duration of the migration season has increased. (2019-02-25)

Researchers report advances in stretchable semiconductors, integrated electronics
Researchers from the University of Houston have reported significant advances in stretchable electronics, moving the field closer to commercialization. (2019-02-01)

New science details discovery of bacterial pathogen in brains of Alzheimer's patients
New science uncovers how an unlikely culprit, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) -- the bacterium commonly associated with chronic gum disease -- appears to drive Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. (2019-01-23)

Computational advances in the label-free quantification of cancer proteomics data
In this paper, the recent advances and development in the computational perspective of LFQ in cancer proteomics were systematically reviewed and analyzed. (2018-12-27)

Treatment of Parkinson's disease: Separating hope from hype
This review emphasized the development of various non-pharmaceutical therapeutic approaches and mainly highlighted the cutting-edge treatments for PD including gene- and stem cell-based therapies, targeted delivery of neurotrophic factors, and brain stimulation techniques such as Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), and Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). (2018-12-26)

The role of calcium handling mechanisms in reperfusion injury
Cardiovascular diseases, such as stroke and myocardial infarction (MI) remain the major cause of death and disability worldwide.The overall goal of this review is to describe the different pathways that lead to I/R injury via Ca2+ overload, focus on recent discoveries and highlight prospects for therapeutic strategies for clinical benefit. (2018-12-19)

Brain-computer interface advances improve prosthetics, therapies
Advances in connecting neural stimulation to physical control of the body are transforming the development of prosthetics and therapeutic training for people with disabilities, according to new research. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2018-11-06)

Adolescent brain development impacts mental health, substance use
Advances in understanding adolescent brain development may aid future treatments of mental illness and alcohol and substance use disorders. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2018-11-05)

A new method to quickly identify outliers in air quality monitoring data
Ambient air quality monitoring data are the most important source for public awareness regarding air quality and are widely used in many research fields, such as improving air quality forecasting and the analysis of haze episodes. However, there are outliers among such monitoring data, due to instrument malfunctions, the influence of harsh environments, and the limitation of measuring methods. A new method can flag potentially erroneous data in the hourly observations from 1436 stations of the China National Environmental Monitoring Center (CNEMC) within a minute. (2018-10-29)

Who needs genetic testing for breast cancer?
Advances are regularly being made in cancer genetics. But, if patients aren't screened and diagnosed early enough, the advances can't save lives. A presentation at The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, Oct. 3-6, will review the various genetic testing options for breast cancer, as well as profile those who should be tested. (2018-10-03)

Emissions-free energy system saves heat from the summer sun for winter
A research group from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has made great, rapid strides towards the development of a specially designed molecule which can store solar energy for later use. These advances have been presented in four scientific articles this year, with the most recent being published in the highly ranked journal Energy & Environmental Science. (2018-10-03)

Nature holds key to nurturing green water treatment facilities
The quest to develop greener and more affordable methods to treat wastewater has taken a new, innovative twist. (2018-08-01)

Pulmonary arterial hypertension medical management of the adult patient with CHD
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (Volume3, Number 1, 2018, pp. pp. 1-8(8); DOI 10.15212/CVIA.2017.0038), Ali Ataya, Julian Chung, Jessica Cope and Hassan Alnuaimat from Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, and Department of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, US consider how congenital heart disease (CHD)-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) includes a heterogeneous patient population that can be characterized by the underlying cardiac malformation. (2018-06-10)

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