Current Advancing Public Interests News and Events

Current Advancing Public Interests News and Events, Advancing Public Interests News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
How women, migrants and workers are represented in the German Bundestag
Political scientists from the universities of Konstanz, Basel, Geneva and Stuttgart examine how members of the German Bundestag who belong to disadvantaged groups advocate for their interests (2021-02-23)

Should Uber and Lyft be electrifying more vehicles?
Increases in air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions caused by ridesourcing impact human health and the environment--what happens when companies shoulder that cost? (2021-02-19)

Rich nations see virus rates fall quicker -- study
Richer countries were more likely to see rates of COVID-19 fall faster during the first wave of the pandemic, according to new research published in the journal Frontiers in Public Health. (2021-02-18)

Suggesting healthy food 'swaps' to online shoppers may reduce the calories they buy
Suggesting healthy food 'swaps' to online shopping customers may effectively reduce the calories they buy, according to simulation study. (2021-02-17)

It's morally wrong for rich nations to hoard COVID-19 vaccine
Rich nations should not engage in ''vaccine nationalism'' and keep the COVID-19 vaccine to themselves when poorer nations need them, according to Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Hassoun's paper, ''Against Vaccine Nationalism,'' was published in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2021-02-16)

Severe undercounting of COVID-19 cases in U.S., other countries estimated via model
A new machine-learning framework uses reported test results and death rates to calculate estimates of the actual number of current COVID-19 infections within all 50 U.S. states and 50 countries. Jungsik Noh and Gaudenz Danuser of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on February 8, 2021. (2021-02-08)

US counties with more social capital have fewer COVID-19 infections and deaths
US counties with more social capital have fewer COVID-19 infections and deaths - perhaps because these communities have greater concern for the health of others. (2021-02-05)

Could game theory optimize PPE stock management during the COVID-19 pandemic?
Could game theory optimize PPE stock management during the COVID-19 pandemic? (2021-02-01)

On the origins of money: Ancient European hoards full of standardized bronze objects
In the Early Bronze Age of Europe, ancient people used bronze objects as an early form of money, even going so far as to standardize the shape and weight of their currency, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Maikel H. G. Kuijpers and C?t?lin N. Popa of Leiden University, Netherlands. (2021-01-20)

Over 34,000 street cattle roam the Indian city of Raipur (1 for every 54 human residents)
There may be over 34,000 street cattle in the Indian city of Raipur (one for every 54 human residents), with implications for road accidents and human-cattle conflict. (2021-01-20)

Antibiotics combinations used regularly worldwide--but 80% of these not recommended by WHO
Fixed dose combinations of antibiotics are consumed in huge quantities globally, but 80 percent of combinations are not on the WHO Essential Medicines List, and 92 percent are not FDA-approved, - with inappropriate combinations risking inefficacy, toxicity, and selection for antimicrobial resistance. (2021-01-20)

Female Bengalese finches have lifelong preference for their father's song to other birds'
Daddies' girls? Female Bengalese finches prefer their father's song to that of other birds throughout their lives - while sons lose this preference as they grow up. (2021-01-20)

Special interests can be assets for youth with autism
COLUMBIA, Mo. - When he was in middle school, teachers would give Sam Curran a list of words to type in a computer to practice his vocabulary. (2021-01-15)

Males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females, study finds
Males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, more likely to have complications and more likely to die from the virus than females, independent of age, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Farhaan Vahidy of Houston Methodist Research Institute, US, and colleagues. (2021-01-13)

Cutting COVID-19 infectious period could prevent millions of cases
A new computational analysis suggests that a vaccine or medication that could shorten the infectious period of COVID-19 may potentially prevent millions of cases and save billions of dollars. The study was led by Bruce Lee along with colleagues in the Public Health Informatics, Computational, and Operations Research (PHICOR) team headquartered at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy and the Lundquist Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, and publishes in the open-access journal PLOS Computational Biology. (2021-01-07)

Countries led by women haven't fared significantly better in the COVID-19 pandemic
Countries led by women have not fared significantly better in the COVID-19 pandemic than those led by men- it may be just our Western media bias that makes us think they have! (2020-12-31)

Children's emotion inferences from masked faces during the COVID-19 pandemic
Children struggle to discern emotions for mask-wearing faces, though masks are ''unlikely to dramatically impair'' their everyday interactions. (2020-12-23)

VR simulations shed potential light on goalkeepers' ability to stop free kicks
Virtual reality simulations of football (soccer) free kicks suggests placing a defensive wall can block a goalie's view and hamper their performance - and simulations might be useful in other sports too. (2020-12-23)

Many Americans reported economic hardships even early in the COVID-19 pandemic
Significant proportions of US respondents were experiencing economic hardships even early in the COVID-19 pandemic, with Hispanic citizens being particularly affected, according to research by Shatakshee Dhongde at the Georgia Institute of Technology, U.S., publishing in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on December 16, 2020. (2020-12-16)

More years of obesity means higher risk of disease, study finds
A greater obesity duration is associated with worse values for all cardiometabolic disease factors, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Tom Norris of Loughborough University, UK, and colleagues. (2020-12-08)

Optimal horse racing speed pinpointed by mathematical analysis
Optimal horse racing speed over the course of a flat race pinpointed by mathematical analysis to help achieve the fastest time, including adjustments for racecourse topography (2020-12-02)

Glass beads from medieval sites suggest more complex trade networks
Glass beads from remote medieval sites in Mali and Senegal suggest long distance trade networks may have been more extensive than previously thought -- while a modern bead fragment also implicates a modern grave looter! (2020-12-02)

Videoscope analysis of a Neanderthal skeleton reveals detailed dental information
Videoscope analysis of a well-preserved Neanderthal skeleton from Altamura, Italy reveals detailed dental information, including tooth wear and tooth loss. (2020-12-02)

A growth mindset of interest can spark innovative thinking
Researchers from Yale-NUS College find that viewing interests as developable, not fixed, can help people make connections among diverse fields that others might miss, with implications for innovation. Their research suggests that understanding this can benefit organisations in generating innovative solutions and ideas, job seekers taking on new or wide-ranging responsibilities, and can create a culture for interdisciplinary learning and problem-solving. (2020-11-25)

The epidemiology of muscle-strengthening exercise in Europe: A 28-country comparison
A 28-country comparison of 280,605 adults reveals that just 17% of adult Europeans perform specific muscle-strengthening exercises--e.g.: squats, situps, and pushups--twice or more a week, as recommended by the WHO. (2020-11-25)

Study characterizes suspected COVID-19 infections in emergency departments in the UK
Among patients reporting to hospital emergency departments (EDs) with suspected COVID-19 infection, important differences in symptoms and outcome exist based on age, sex and ethnicity, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Steve Goodacre of the University of Sheffield, UK, and colleagues. (2020-11-25)

U.S. should look at how other high-income countries regulate health care costs
Structuring negotiations between insurers and providers, standardizing fee-for-service payments and negotiating prices can lower the United States' health care spending by slowing the rate at which healthcare prices increase, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-11-22)

How the flu virus spreads within cities
New insights into the local transmission of seasonal influenza may be valuable for planning interventions to combat the spread of respiratory diseases within cities, according to a study published November 19, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Nicola Müller and Tanja Stadler of ETH Zürich, and colleagues. (2020-11-19)

Cesarean section-born children may face higher risk of infection-related hospitalization
Children born via cesarean section may be more likely to be hospitalized for infection during early childhood. A study published in PLOS Medicine by Jessica Miller at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Australia and colleagues suggests that compared to vaginally-born children, cesarean-born children may have a higher risk of infection-related hospitalization for up to five years of age. (2020-11-19)

Racial attitudes in a community affect COVID-19 numbers
Implicit racial attitudes within a community can effectively explain racial disparities seen in rates of COVID-19 in the United States, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by George Cunningham and Lisa Wigfall of Texas A&M University, USA. (2020-11-18)

Politicians and governments are suppressing science, argues The BMJ
Politicians and governments are suppressing science, and when good science is suppressed, people die, argues a senior editor at The BMJ today. (2020-11-13)

Increased early-stage cancer diagnoses tied to ACA's Medicaid expansion, Pitt study finds
The study showed that health insurance expansions increased early-stage cancer diagnoses, while rates of late-stage cancer decreased. (2020-11-12)

Sixty-year old cohort study reveals adolescent value predicts wellbeing in older age
Subjective wellbeing leads to better health, but we did not know what in our younger years determines our wellbeing in old age. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science have demonstrated that adolescents who valued their interests and curiosity had higher wellbeing in old age from a 60-year-old cohort in the UK. We additionally found that adolescents with low self-control who valued money and steady jobs had significantly lower wellbeing in old age. (2020-11-11)

Job interest not a big predictor of job satisfaction
Interest in an occupation matters, but not as much as you might think when it comes to job satisfaction. While it's not a strong predictor of satisfaction, a University of Houston researcher found that it may help in your performance on the job. (2020-11-11)

The mental state of flow might protect against harmful effects of quarantine
A survey of over 5,000 people in Chinese cities affected by COVID-19 in early 2020 suggests that people who quarantined for a longer period of time generally experienced poorer well-being--but that experiencing the mental state of flow reduced or eliminated that link. Kate Sweeny and colleagues at the University of California, Riverside, U.S., Central China Normal University, China and Nanjing University, China and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on November 11, 2020. (2020-11-11)

Intensive lab experiences and online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic
For students studying ecology and evolution, it's important to experience the processes and concepts they are learning about nature in nature. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, field-based courses rapidly transitioned to online only delivery. An article published in Ecology and Evolution discusses the potential advantages of pairing an intensive lab experience with an otherwise online delivery. (2020-11-04)

'Improvised' decontamination procedures are likely better than nothing for toxic chemicals
If you encounter toxic chemicals, 'improvised' decontamination procedures are likely better than nothing, especially when combining dry and wet removal techniques. (2020-11-04)

Resistance and challenges to Green Deals should not be underestimated
A Perspective by the EASAC Environment Steering Panel (2020-10-29)

Keeping the spark lit into the golden years
Have you passed your supposed prime and feel like it takes more to get fired up? The good news is you're far from alone. And you can do something about it. (2020-10-23)

American Frozen Food Institute's international expert panel publishes new manuscript
The American Frozen Food Institute (AFFI) announces the publication of a new manuscript, ''Alternative Approaches to the Risk Management of Listeria monocytogenes in Low Risk Foods,'' now available online in Food Control, an international scientific journal for food safety and process control professionals. (2020-10-16)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.