Current Advertising News and Events

Current Advertising News and Events, Advertising News Articles.
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A study analyses breakfast-related advertising in Mediterranean countries
According to the Breakfast Food Advertisements in Mediterranean Countries: Products' Sugar Content in Adverts from 2015 to 2019 report produced by UOC Faculty of Information and Communication Sciences professor and researcher, Mireia Montaña, the majority of breakfast products marketed for children contain three times as much sugar as those aimed at adults, influencing their choices for one of the most important meals of the day. (2021-02-11)

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: 40% of countries show no progress in reducing cigarette smoking in adolescents over last 20 years
Despite an overall reduction in cigarette use over the last 20 years, nearly 1 in 5 boys (17.9%) and more than 1 in 10 girls (11.5%) around the world used tobacco at least once in the past month between 2010-2018, according to a new study published today in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal. (2021-02-02)

CCNY researchers demonstrate how to measure student attention during remote learning
The Covid-19 pandemic has made home offices, virtual meetings and remote learning the norm, and it is likely here to stay. But are people paying attention in online meetings? Are students paying attention in virtual classrooms? Researchers Jens Madsen and Lucas C. Parra from City College of New York, demonstrate how eye tracking can be used to measure the level of attention online using standard web cameras, without the need to transfer any data from peoples computers, thus preserving privacy. (2021-01-29)

Paper: Emotionally appealing ads may not always help consumer memory
Emotional appeals in advertisements may not always help improve consumers' immediate recall of a product, says a new paper co-written by Hayden Noel, a clinical associate professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois. (2021-01-07)

Extreme political advertising can hurt campaign efforts
Aggressive political messaging can work against candidates by radicalizing supporters and alienating moderates, according to a Dartmouth study. (2020-12-15)

Negative reviews boost sales
Aleksei Smirnov, Assistant Professor, HSE University Faculty of Economic Sciences, and Egor Starkov, Assistant Professor, University of Copenhagen, have constructed a mathematical model that explains why it is advantageous for sellers not to delete negative reviews of their products. A study detailing this conclusion has been accepted for publication in The American Economic Journal: Microeconomics. (2020-12-11)

Which product categories and industries benefit most from social advertising
New research from a team of scientists at four leading universities has shed new light on the effectiveness of social advertising in specific product categories to learn which product categories tend to benefit more from social advertising, and which may not. (2020-12-10)

Eyebuy: Sweeping glances can cost you money
When Christmas shopping, customers should keep their eyes unter control. As a study by researchers from Austria, Germany and UK shows, visual attention can be strongly influenced during shopping with very simple interventions. The researchers report in the Journal of Consumer Research that unplanned purchases can even double as a result. (2020-12-08)

Labeling paid 'influencer' vaping posts as ads draws attention
Social media influencers vaping glamorously into their social media feeds are often not doing so for free. And new research suggests that calling out their pay-to-play posts as advertisements in a plain, obvious way might have an impact on young people. (2020-12-08)

Long-term data shows racial & ethnic disparities in effectiveness of anti-smoking measures
Tobacco control efforts have reduced cigarette smoking for many, but those efforts have disproportionately helped white smokers, while other racial and ethnic groups are still struggling, an Oregon State University researcher's analysis found. (2020-12-01)

Boosting returns on e-commerce retargeting campaigns
Delivering ECR ads too early can engender worse purchase rates than without delivering them, thus wasting online advertising budgets. (2020-11-13)

Age gates on alcohol websites are ineffective, Texas A&M research shows
''Age gates'' that aim to keep underage users off alcohol websites are mostly ineffective, a Texas A&M University alcohol researcher found. (2020-11-11)

When kids watch a lot of TV, parents may end up more stressed
The more TV kids watch, the more ads they see and the more likely they are to ask for things on shopping trips. That may contribute to parents' overall stress levels, researchers found. (2020-11-10)

Do spoilers harm movie box-office revenue?
Spoiler reviews have a positive and statistically significant relationship with box office revenue. (2020-11-09)

Teen boys link marijuana use with more, better sex
Teen-age boys exposed to pro-cannabis advertising and social media posts are more likely than female peers to associate marijuana use with improving sexual activity, new research from Washington State University suggests. (2020-10-28)

Kid influencers are promoting junk food brands on YouTube -- garnering more than a billion views
Kids with wildly popular YouTube channels are frequently promoting unhealthy food and drinks in their videos, warn researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health and NYU Grossman School of Medicine in a new study published in the journal Pediatrics. (2020-10-26)

Save it or spend it? Advertising decisions amid consumer word-of-mouth
Most people have seen or heard from a friend, neighbor or family member about a product or service they've used and how their experience was. It's called observational learning or word-of-mouth. These communications don't provide an unbiased assessment of true quality. Given this, businesses are faced with the difficult decision of determining when and how to spend their ad dollars. (2020-10-19)

Television advertising limits can reduce childhood obesity, study concludes
Limiting the hours of television advertising for foods and beverages high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS) could make a meaningful contribution to reducing childhood obesity, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Oliver Mytton of the University of Cambridge, UK, and colleagues. (2020-10-13)

Research pinpoints major drivers of tobacco epidemic among teens in South Asia
The findings of a new study pinpoint the major drivers of the tobacco epidemic among teens in South Asia. (2020-10-12)

Cannabis ads and store location influence youth marijuana use
States may want to consider the proximity of cannabis retailers and cannabis advertising to neighborhoods to prevent underage use of the drug, according to new WSU research. (2020-10-08)

Association between chain restaurant advertising, obesity in adults
Researchers examined whether changes in chain restaurant advertising spending were associated with weight changes among adults across 370 counties in the United States. (2020-10-07)

New research determines if political "air war" or "ground game" is most effective
CATONSVILLE, MD, October 7, 2020 - New research has shed light on how various political campaign activities influence voters. It found that a candidate's mass media advertising is more likely to influence independent voters, while the campaign's ''ground game,'' targeting voters through grassroots outreach, is more effective at reaching a candidate's base. (2020-10-07)

Marketing study investigates impact of Viagra TV ads on birth rates
Marketing researchers found that an increase in advertising of erectile dysfunction drugs contributed to more total births in Massachusetts. (2020-10-01)

Boosting public trust in scientists hangs on communications methods
According to Geah Pressgrove, of West Virginia University, scientists and communications professionals need to rethink how they communicate through four distinct dimensions of trust: competence, integrity, benevolence and openness. (2020-09-28)

Covert tobacco industry marketing tactics exposed by former employees
Tobacco companies use covert marketing tactics and exploit loopholes in Australian tobacco control laws to promote their products despite current tobacco advertising bans, finds new research from University of Sydney and Cancer Council NSW. To circumvent current tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS) laws in Australia, tobacco companies are incentivising retailers with cash payments, all-expenses paid holidays, exclusive parties and tickets to sporting events to drive tobacco sales. (2020-09-28)

Scientists evaluated the prospects of medical tourism in Russia
Scientists from Sechenov University interviewed Russian healthcare experts to find out what problems impeded the development of medical tourism in the country most and what measures would help attract foreigners. The results of the work can form the basis of the state policy in this field. Details of the study were published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology. (2020-09-17)

TV ads for psoriasis and eczema medications portray few people of color
Commercials from pharmaceutical companies advertising medication to treat psoriasis and eczema lack people from racial and ethnic minorities, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (2020-09-15)

Facebook political ads more partisan, less negative than TV
More political candidates may be shifting primarily to social media to advertise rather than TV, according to a study of advertising trends from the 2018 campaign season. The study also found that Facebook political ads were more partisan, less negative and less issue-focused than those on TV. (2020-09-14)

Some children at higher risk of privacy violations from digital apps
While federal privacy laws prohibit digital platforms from storing and sharing children's personal information, those rules aren't always enforced, researchers find. (2020-09-08)

Televised political campaign ads with different features have similarly small effects on voters
New research suggests that the effect of any individual televised political ad on how much a subject favors a candidate and who they plan to vote for is relatively minor. This is regardless of message, context sender, and receiver. The study's findings are based on a comprehensive analysis of 49 professionally produced political campaign ads presented to 34,000 nationally (2020-09-02)

Political ads have little persuasive power
Every four years, US presidential campaigns collectively spend billions of dollars flooding TV screens across the country with political ads. But a new study co-authored by Yale political scientist Alexander Coppock shows that, regardless of content, context, or audience, those pricey commercials do little to persuade voters. (2020-09-02)

Airing commercials after political ads actually helps sell nonpolitical products
About $7 billion reportedly will be spent this fall on television and digital commercials from political campaigns and political action committees. Companies running ads immediately afterward have been concerned about the potential of a negative spillover effect on how they and their products and services are perceived. But new research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business finds that the opposite is true. Contrary to mainstream thought, political ads instead yield positive spillover effects for nonpolitical advertisers. (2020-08-18)

New research may help identify sex trafficking networks
Characterizing traits of online activity may help to rescue victims of sex trafficking. While scientists have tried to help pinpoint outfits participating in trafficking, few scientific studies have looked of how the digital infrastructure behind the online sex market operates. A paper from Mayank Kejriwal, a research assistant professor at the USC Information Sciences Institute and Yao Gu (currently at Amazon) provides some insights on the specific digital practices of potential sex trafficking networks. (2020-08-10)

Children's pester power a future target for interventions
Children's pester power may contribute to improvements in their family's food environments. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, highlights the potential for children to influence food consumption and habits at home. (2020-08-06)

Digital buccaneers boost box office bang
Pirated movies circulated online after their theatrical release saw about 3% higher box office receipts because of the increase in word-of-mouth advertising. (2020-08-06)

Is less more? How consumers view sustainability claims
Communicating a product's reduced negative attribute might have unintended consequences if consumers approach it with the wrong mindset. Marketers should estimate the potential risks of such communications and carry out such communication strategically. (2020-08-03)

Partnerships with bankrupt companies could be double-edged sword for investors
New research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business found that when a company is in bankruptcy, its advertising and research and development investments can cut both ways. They increase the odds of surviving for some bankrupt companies and decrease the odds for others. (2020-07-30)

Vaping linked with heart problems
In adolescents the use of e-cigarettes doubles the risk of starting to smoke traditional cigarettes, states a position paper published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). ''Vaping is marketed towards teenagers and the tobacco industry uses celebrities to promote it as being healthier than smoking,'' said senior author Professor Maja-Lisa Løchen of UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø. (2020-07-29)

Medical journals' commercial publishing contracts may lead to biased articles
Scientists have long been concerned that the common practice of medical journals accepting commercial payments from pharmaceutical companies may lead to pro-industry bias in published articles. According to new research at The University of Texas at Austin, scientists were right to be concerned, but they were focusing on the wrong type of payments. (2020-07-27)

Do campaign finance reforms truly help make elections more competitive?
A new study by two social scientists at the University of Missouri finds state campaign finance reforms actually have no beneficial effect on the competitiveness of state legislative elections. Instead, some reforms, such as limits on corporate political spending and public financing of elections, advantage incumbents. (2020-07-15)

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