Current Advocacy Group Statements News and Events

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Politics and the brain: Attention perks up when politicians break with party lines
Building upon previous work studying the brain and politics, Ingrid Haas, associate professor of political science affiliated with Nebraska's Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior, examined the insula and anterior cingular cortex in 58 individuals using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and learned that the human brain processes politically incongruent statements differently. (2021-02-22)

Study finds no gender discrimination when leaders use confident language
People tend to listen to big talkers, whether they are women or men. Still, more women prefer not to use assertive language, according to a new study. Participants in an experiment more often followed advice of people using assertive ''cheap talk,'' statements that cannot be verified as true. (Example: ''I have extremely strong problem-solving skills.'') They followed advice regardless of advice giver's gender but thought others would be less likely to follow female leaders' advice. (2021-02-18)

Latinx youth's helping behavior tied to cultural processes as well as parenting practices
Although interest in studying prosocial behaviors among US Latinx individuals has increased recently, there is still limited existing research with this population. Evidence shows that prosocial behaviors (actions intended to benefit others) are a marker of healthy social functioning and can both support positive development (such as academic achievement) and mitigate problematic outcomes (such as anxiety and depression). A new longitudinal study in the United States examined relations among parenting, culture, and prosocial behaviors in US Mexican youth. (2021-02-17)

New microscopy analysis allows discovery of central adhesion complex
Researchers at University of Münster and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry have developed a method for determining the arrangement and density of individual proteins in cells. In this way, they were able to prove the existence of an adhesion complex consisting of three proteins. (2021-02-15)

How complex oscillations in a quantum system simplify with time
With a clever experiment, physicists have shown that in a one-dimensional quantum system, the initially complex distribution of vibrations or phonons can change over time into a simple Gaussian bell curve. The experiment took place at the Vienna University of Technology, while the theoretical considerations were carried out by a joint research group from the Freie Universität Berlin and HZB. (2021-01-25)

Ten suggestions for female faculty and staff during the pandemic
''Ten simple rules for women principal investigators during a pandemic'' was published recently in PLOS Computational Biology. It's perhaps important to note that despite its title, the article is careful to say that the cardinal rule is that there are no rules. So all 10 points outlined are in fact suggestions. Also despite its title, Rangamani says most of the 10 points outlined in the publication can apply to all caregivers juggling work and caregiving during the pandemic. (2021-01-21)

'Aging well' greatly affected by hopes and fears for later life, OSU study finds
If you believe you are capable of becoming the healthy, engaged person you want to be in old age, you are much more likely to experience that outcome, a recent Oregon State University study shows. (2021-01-21)

Making microwaves safer for children
Researchers at Rush University Medical Center and other leaders of the campaign, worked diligently to document the frequency and severity of burn injuries resulting from removing hot contents from the microwave and young children's vulnerability to them, published the results of their efforts in The Journal of Pediatrics on Jan. 20. (2021-01-20)

Describing the worldviews of the new 'tech elite'
The new tech elite share distinct views setting them apart from other segments of the world's elite more generally, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hilke Brockmann from Jacobs University Bremen, Germany, and colleagues. (2021-01-20)

Medical terms for opioid addiction don't always reduce stigma, study finds
Researchers conducted a nationally representative study with more than 3,500 participants to test how six common terms describing someone treated for opioid-related impairment influenced perceptions. The researchers found that there was not one single term that can reduce all potential stigma biases. (2021-01-20)

Organizations collaborate to develop international von Willebrand Disease guidelines
The American Society of Hematology (ASH), the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH), National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF), and World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) have developed joint clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis and management of von Willebrand Disease (VWD), the world's most common inherited bleeding disorder. The guidelines were published today in Blood Advances. (2021-01-12)

When salespeople advocate for sellers and customers
The most favorable outcomes result when the salesperson engages in high levels of both customer advocacy and seller advocacy. (2021-01-08)

Proportionally more male bosses negative toward depression
A higher proportion of male than of female managers have negative attitudes toward depression, a University of Gothenburg study shows. The more senior the managerial positions, the bigger the share of men with negative attitudes; the same, moreover, applies to women in senior managerial jobs. (2020-12-14)

'The robot made me do it': Robots encourage risk-taking behaviour in people
New research has shown robots can encourage humans to take greater risks in a simulated gambling scenario than they would if there was nothing to influence their behaviours. Increasing our understanding of whether robots can affect risk-taking could have clear ethical, practiCal and policy implications, which this study set out to explore. (2020-12-11)

Most countries are violating international law during the COVID-19 pandemic: Legal experts
In 2019, the Global Health Law Consortium, hosted at York U, analyzed key aspects of the International Health Regulations (IHR) to authoritatively interpret what countries are legally allowed to do during public health crises like Ebola & SARS. This work became even more relevant when COVID-19 began spreading around the world early this year; the Consortium members reviewed how countries reacted to the outbreak based on the IHRs that legally bind 196 countries (2020-12-03)

Narcissists love being pandemic 'essential workers'
There's one group of essential workers who especially enjoy being called a ''hero'' during the COVID-19 pandemic: narcissists. In a new study, researchers found that essential workers (including those in restaurants, grocery and retail stores) who scored higher on measures of narcissism shared more than others about their work. And this sharing on social media, in person and elsewhere increased their narcissistic feelings in the moment. (2020-11-24)

MMR vaccine could protect against COVID-19
The measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine has been theorized to provide protection against COVID-19. In a new study published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers provide further proof of this by showing that mumps IgG titers, or levels of IgG antibody, are inversely correlated with severity in recovered COVID-19 patients previously vaccinated with the MMR II vaccine produced by Merck (2020-11-20)

Pre-recorded audio messages help improve outcomes for patients with heart failure
Heart failure patients who listened to pre-recorded audio messages of support and guidance were 27% less likely to return to the emergency department one-month after discharge. At 90-days after hospital discharge, the odds of all-cause death and heart failure death decreased by 43% and 48%, respectively, among those who received the audio card. Consistent messages over time may lead to better behaviors in diet, activity and medication therapy for patients discharged from the hospital with heart failure. (2020-11-17)

Explaining the religious vote for Trump
New research by Louisiana State University sociologists indicate it wasn't Christian nationalism that drove churchgoers' Trump vote in 2016. Rather, surprisingly, Christian nationalism was important among non-churchgoers. (2020-11-10)

De novo protein decoys block COVID-19 infection in vitro and protect animals in vivo
Publication in Science by Neoleukin Therapeutics of research describing novel molecules designed to treat or prevent infection by the virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2. Report details the creation of de novo protein decoys specifically designed to bind the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein with high affinity, preventing its association with the viral receptor hACE2, which is required for infection. ''De novo design of potent and resilient hACE2 decoys to neutralize SARS-CoV-2'' is available via Science First Release. (2020-11-05)

Theoreticians show which quantum systems are suitable for quantum simulations
A joint research group led by Prof. Jens Eisert of Freie Universität Berlin and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has shown a way to simulate the quantum physical properties of complex solid state systems. This is done with the help of complex solid state systems that can be studied experimentally. The study was published in the renowned journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS). (2020-10-27)

Bioplastics no safer than other plastics
Bioplastics contain substances that are as toxic as those in ordinary plastics. (2020-10-23)

'Patient activation' may improve quality of life in individuals with kidney disease
In individuals with chronic kidney disease who received online peer mentoring, improved patient activation correlated with improvements in various aspects of quality of life. Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-23)

Remember that fake news you read? It may help you remember even more
Thinking back on a time you encountered false information or ''fake news'' may prime your brain to better recall truthful memories. (2020-10-16)

Lie detection -- Have the experts got it wrong?
Researchers led by the University of Portsmouth carried out a critical analysis of the Model Statement lie detection technique and the results have been published today in the Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling. There are concerns that the use of the technique is dangerous in the pursuit of criminal justice and researchers are calling for an urgent review of its practice. (2020-10-15)

The valuation of a company's investment properties may bring surprises
In addition to the financial statements and balance sheet, an investor should also go through the notes and understand their content. For example, the valuation of a company's investment properties in the financial statements may bring surprises depending on whether the company has performed the valuation itself or used an external party for it. (2020-10-12)

Face masks unlikely to cause over-exposure to CO2, even in patients with lung disease
New research findings contradict statements linking wearing face masks to carbon dioxide poisoning by trapping CO2. During the COVID-19 pandemic the wearing of face masks has become a highly political issue with some individuals falsely claiming that wearing face masks may be putting people's health at risk. The study published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society shows otherwise. (2020-10-02)

'Street' ERTs are more useful in predicting companies' future tax outcomes, study finds
New research from the University of Notre Dame sheds light on the most effective methods to predict future tax outcomes, which simplifies the decision-making process for investors. (2020-09-30)

How everyday speech could transmit viral droplets
High-speed imaging of an individual producing common speech sounds shows that the sudden burst of airflow produced from the articulation of consonants like /p/ or /b/ carry salivary and mucus droplets for at least a meter in front of a speaker. (2020-09-29)

Social media use linked with depression, secondary trauma during COVID-19
Can't stop checking social media for the latest COVID-19 health information? You might want to take a break, according to researchers at Penn State and Jinan University who discovered that excessive use of social media for COVID-19 health information is related to both depression and secondary trauma. (2020-09-29)

Neurotic college students could benefit from health education
College students are under a lot of stress, even more so lately due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on certain personality types, especially neurotic personalities, college health courses could help students develop a more positive stress mindset, according to research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-09-23)

From carbon taxes to tax breaks, emission reduction policies have widespread support
As the general election nears amid a historic season of hurricanes, wildfires, and heat waves, a new survey finds that majorities of Americans are supportive of climate change mitigation measures. This suggests that policymakers can introduce legislation that would enjoy public approval--including a green stimulus package to help deal with the economic downturn associated with COVID-19. (2020-09-23)

The expanding aims of high schools in the 21st century
A new study just published in the most recent issue of the Journal of Education and Social Policy examined how Massachusetts public high schools defined and changed their purpose and expectations over an 18-year period, suggesting that Bay State secondary schools expanded rather than honed their mission to meet society's ever-growing needs, a role exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-09-14)

Dismantling structural racism in nursing
Confronting the uncomfortable reality of systemic racism - the system that creates and maintains racial inequality in every facet of life for people of color - is having a national heyday. But calling out this injustice and doing something about it are two different things. (2020-09-09)

Key priorities for transplant and living donor advocacy during COVID-1
Researchers describe ways to achieve optimal patient advocacy for kidney recipients and donors during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. (2020-09-04)

Weight shaming appears to be declining more in the USA than in the UK
Americans are less likely to blame people with obesity for their condition, and are more likely to believe that obesity has a medical explanation now than 3 years ago, suggest the results of two online surveys involving more than 6,000 UK and US adults, being presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO 2020), held online this year from 1-4 September. (2020-09-01)

Save black lives
The Center for Justice Research at Texas Southern University and the Black Public Defender Association today released ''Save Black Lives: A Call for Racially-responsive Strategies and Resources for the Black Community during the COVID-19 Pandemic,'' a comprehensive report that details why public health responses and strategies to address COVID-19 must be centered around race and the criminal legal system. (2020-08-05)

Quality suffers for audit offices with clients from different industries, study shows
If an audit office has a diversified client portfolio, it is more difficult to audit a particular type of client, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (2020-08-05)

Challenges in diagnosing hypersensitivity pneumonitis addressed in latest guidelines
More than 30 years after the last guidance on the clinical evaluation of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP), the American Thoracic Society - in collaboration with the Asociación Latinoamericana de Tórax or ALAT and the Japanese Respiratory Society- has developed new guidelines for clinicians. The guidelines are available online ahead of print in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2020-08-03)

Language may undermine women in science and tech
Researchers examined gender stereotypes baked into 25 languages to explore why fewer women enter science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields. (2020-08-03)

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