Current Aerospace Engineering News and Events

Current Aerospace Engineering News and Events, Aerospace Engineering News Articles.
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Life from Earth could temporarily survive on Mars
German Aerospace Center scientists. The researchers launched these small lifeforms into Earth's stratosphere, which replicates key characteristics of the Martian environment, and found that some microorganisms, in particular spores of black mold, survived the trip. This new way of testing endurance to space travel will be invaluable for understanding the threats and opportunities of microbes in future missions to Mars. (2021-02-22)

Can bacteria make stronger cars, airplanes and armor?
Biological systems can harness their living cells for growth and regeneration, but engineering systems cannot. Until now.Researchers are harnessing living bacteria to create engineering materials that are strong, tolerant, and resilient. (2021-02-22)

This robot doesn't need any electronics
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have created a four-legged soft robot that doesn't need any electronics to work. The robot only needs a constant source of pressurized air for all its functions, including its controls and locomotion systems. The team, led by Michael T. Tolley, a professor of mechanical engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, details its findings in the Feb. 17, 2021 issue of Science Robotics. (2021-02-17)

Skoltech's recent achievement takes us one step closer to Mars
Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that enables processing images from autonomous greenhouses, monitoring plant growth, and automating the cultivation process. In their article, they share the experience in the scope of controlled-environment agriculture automation in the Antarctic station greenhouse facility called EDEN ISS. (2021-02-17)

Robots sense human touch using camera and shadows
Cornell University researchers have created a low-cost method for soft, deformable robots to detect a range of physical interactions, from pats to punches to hugs, without relying on touch at all. Instead, a USB camera located inside the robot captures the shadow movements of hand gestures on the robot's skin and classifies them with machine-learning software. (2021-02-08)

New global 'wind atlas' propels sustainable energy
Wind energy scientists at Cornell University have released a new global wind atlas - a digital compendium filled with documented extreme wind speeds for all parts of the world - to help engineers select the turbines in any given region and accelerate the development of sustainable energy. (2021-02-03)

Islands without structure inside metal alloys could lead to tougher materials
An international team of researchers produced islands of amorphous, non-crystalline material inside a class of new metal alloys known as high-entropy alloys. This discovery opens the door to applications in everything from landing gears, to pipelines, to automobiles. The new materials could make these lighter, safer, and more energy efficient. (2021-01-29)

Dewdrops on a spiderweb reveal the physics behind cell structures
Researchers in the laboratories of Princeton University scientists Joshua Shaevitz, Howard Stone, and Sabine Petry have discovered that surface tension drives the liquid-like protein TPX2 to form globules that nucleate the formation of branching microtubules during cell division. The paper detailing these discoveries appeared in the Jan 28 issue of the journal Nature Physics. (2021-01-29)

NTU study finds Singapore public less keen on drone use in residential areas than industrial zones
When it comes to drones, the Singapore public is not as keen for them to be used to provide services around their living spaces, finds a study by researchers at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore). However, they are more accepting of drones being used in areas like recreational spots or industrial areas. (2021-01-28)

Mechanism that produces rapid acceleration in clicking beetles identified
Snap-through unbending movement of the body is the main reason for the clicking beetle's fast acceleration. (2021-01-21)

Study suggests coffee temporarily counteracts effect of sleep loss on cognitive function
A new study exploring the impact of repeated sleep loss during a simulated working week has found that consuming caffeinated coffee during the day helps to reduce impacts to people's vigilance, alertness, reaction-time, accuracy, working memory, attention and cognitive function, compared to decaffeinated coffee. (2021-01-21)

New COVID-19 model shows little benefit in vaccinating high-risk individuals first
Maurizio Porfiri, Institute Professor at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, led a team that developed a novel theory and simulation platform for modeling COVID spread over the entire town of New Rochelle, located in Westchester County in New York State. The paper, ''High-Resolution Agent-Based Modeling of COVID-19 Spreading in a Small Town,'' published in Advanced Theory and Simulations, details the findings. (2021-01-19)

Latch, load and release: Elastic motion makes click beetles click, study finds
Click beetles can propel themselves more than 20 body lengths into the air, and they do so without using their legs. While the jump's motion has been studied in depth, the physical mechanisms that enable the beetles' signature clicking maneuver have not. A new study examines the forces behind this super-fast energy release and provides guidelines for studying extreme motion, energy storage and energy release in other small animals like trap-jaw ants and mantis shrimps. (2021-01-18)

Experts reduce search times for novel high-entropy alloys 13,000-fold using Cuckoo Search
A major roadblock to computational design of high-entropy alloys has been removed, according to scientists at Iowa State University and Lehigh University. Engineers from the Ames Lab and Lehigh University's Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics have developed a process that reduces search time used for predictive design 13,000-fold. (2021-01-14)

UCF researchers use advanced light to reveal how different biofuels behave
Vehicles have evolved to become more efficient and sophisticated, but their fuel hasn't necessarily evolved along with them. The Department of Energy is determined to identify cleaner burning and renewable alternatives to gasoline, and through the work of two UCF researchers, the DOE is one step closer to that goal. (2021-01-12)

Researchers develop new one-step process for creating self-assembled metamaterials
A team led by University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers has discovered a groundbreaking one-step process for creating materials with unique properties, called metamaterials. (2021-01-11)

Scientists develop a cheaper method that might help create fuels from plants
Scientists have figured out a cheaper, more efficient way to conduct a chemical reaction at the heart of many biological processes, which may lead to better ways to create biofuels from plants. (2021-01-08)

UCF engineering and biology researchers collaborate to aid coral reef restoration
Florida's threatened coral reefs have a more than $4 billion annual economic impact on the state's economy, and University of Central Florida researchers are zeroing in on one factor that could be limiting their survival - coral skeleton strength. In a new study published in the journal Coral Reefs, UCF engineering researchers tested how well staghorn coral skeletons withstand the forces of nature and humans, such as impacts from hurricanes and divers. (2021-01-08)

Nanodroplets and ultrasound 'drills' prove effective at tackling tough blood clots
Engineering researchers have developed a new technique for eliminating particularly tough blood clots, using engineered nanodroplets and an ultrasound ''drill'' to break up the clots from the inside out. The technique has not yet gone through clinical testing. In vitro testing has shown promising results. (2021-01-07)

3D-printed smart gel changes shape when exposed to light
Inspired by the color-changing skin of cuttlefish, octopuses and squids, Rutgers engineers have created a 3D-printed smart gel that changes shape when exposed to light, becomes ''artificial muscle'' and may lead to new military camouflage, soft robotics and flexible displays. The engineers also developed a 3D-printed stretchy material that can reveal colors when light changes, according to their study in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces. (2021-01-05)

Heat treatment may make chemotherapy more effective
The study, published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry B, found that ''loading'' a chemotherapy drug on to tiny magnetic particles that can heat up the cancer cells at the same time as delivering the drug to them was up to 34% more effective at destroying the cancer cells than the chemotherapy drug without added heat. (2021-01-05)

UCLA scientists develop high-throughput mitochondria transfer device
Scientists from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer have developed a simple, high-throughput method for transferring isolated mitochondria and their associated mitochondrial DNA into mammalian cells. (2020-12-29)

NTU Singapore scientists invent glue activated by magnetic field
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), have developed a new way to cure adhesives using a magnetic field. (2020-12-22)

Japanese art technique inspires new engineering technique
A team of Northwestern University engineers is using ideas taken from paper-folding practices to create a sophisticated alternative to 3D printing. (2020-12-22)

Researchers use origami to solve space travel challenge
WSU researchers have used the ancient Japanese art of paper folding to possibly solve a key challenge for outer space travel - how to store and move fuel to rocket engines. The researchers have developed an origami-inspired, folded plastic fuel bladder that doesn't crack at super cold temperatures and could someday be used to store and pump fuel. (2020-12-15)

Novel cathode design significantly improves performance of next-generation battery
A research team at HKUST has proposed a novel cathode design concept for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery that substantially improves the performance of this kind of promising next-generation battery. (2020-12-11)

First presentation after Hayabusa2 mission return set for SPIE conference 14 December
As part of the opening plenary session at the SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation Digital Forum, Hitoshi Kuninaka, of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, will be discussing and responding to audience questions about the successful return of the Hayabusa2 capsule from its asteroid-sample mission, a second-time-in-history-success that marks exciting and innovating advances for the astronomical-instrumentation community. In addition, Kuninaka may have initial information regarding what potential treasures the capsule's sample container holds. (2020-12-10)

Predicting British railway delays using artificial intelligence
Over the past 20 years, the number of passengers traveling on British train networks has almost doubled to 1.7 billion annually. With numbers like that it's clear that people rely on rail service in Great Britain, and how many disgruntled patrons there would be when delays occur. A recent study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign used British Railway data and an artificial intelligence model to improve the ability to predict delays in railway networks. (2020-12-10)

Researchers discover a new superhighway system in the Solar System
Researchers have discovered a new superhighway network to travel through the Solar System much faster than was previously possible. Such routes can drive comets and asteroids near Jupiter to Neptune's distance in under a decade and to 100 astronomical units in less than a century. They could be used to send spacecraft to the far reaches of our planetary system relatively fast, and to monitor and understand near-Earth objects that might collide with our planet. (2020-12-09)

Out with the old, in with the new
UVA Engineering Discovery Challenges Heat Transfer Paradigm That Guides Electronic and Photonic Device Design. (2020-12-09)

UCI-led study offers new approach for more accurate epidemic modeling
In a new study published in Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of California, Irvine demonstrate that they can make more accurate predictions about the spread of infectious diseases by using fractional exponents for infected sub-groups, particularly in the early stages of a pandemic. (2020-12-08)

Algorithms and automation: Making new technology faster and cheaper
Additive manufacturing (AM) machinery has advanced over time, however, the necessary software for new machines often lags behind. To help mitigate this issue, Penn State researchers designed an automated process planning software to save money, time and design resources. (2020-12-08)

Image-based navigation could help spacecraft safely land on the moon
In research recently published in the AIAA Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, a multidisciplinary team of engineers demonstrated how a series of lunar images can be used to infer the direction that a spacecraft is moving. This technique, sometimes called visual odometry, allows navigation information to be gathered even when a good map isn't available. The goal is to allow spacecraft to more accurately target and land at a specific location on the moon without requiring a complete map of its surface. (2020-12-07)

Two related discoveries advance basic and applied additive manufacturing research
A research team led by Tao Sun, associate professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Virginia, has made two discoveries that can expand additive manufacturing in aerospace and other industries that rely on strong metal parts. (2020-12-07)

IVF boost: Monash researchers use acoustic waves to select high quality sperm
Monash University researchers have used acoustic waves to develop a new approach to separate high-quality sperm for assisted reproduction. These findings can open windows for infertile couples to have a family of their own using IVF. The procedure can process roughly 140 sperm per second and select more than 60,000 high-quality sperm in under 50 minutes - nearly four times faster than the current gold standard. (2020-12-04)

Research leads to better modeling of hypersonic flow
Designing a thermal protection system to keep astronauts and cargo safe requires an understanding at the molecular level of the complicated physics going on in the gas that flows around the vehicle. Recent research at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign added new knowledge about the physical phenomena that occur as atoms vibrate, rotate, and collide in this extreme environment. (2020-12-03)

Living with autonomous systems "we can trust"
Autonomous systems are affecting virtually all aspects of society, so future designs must be guided by a broad range of societal stakeholders, according to a new report led by the Oden Institute at UT Austin. (2020-12-02)

New method sees fibers in 3D, uses it to estimate conductivity
Designing a vehicle that can drive away the heat that is generated around it when traveling at hypersonic speeds requires an understanding of the thermal properties of the materials used to construct it. A recent two-part study at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign developed a method to create 3D models of the fibers within composite materials then used that information to predict the thermal conductivity of the material. (2020-12-01)

Math enables custom arrangements of liquid 'nesting dolls'
Princeton University researchers have developed a new way to examine, predict and engineer interactions between multiple liquid phases, including arrangements of mixtures with an arbitrary number of separated phases. (2020-11-30)

Optimizing complex modeling processes through machine learning technologies
Engineering a spaceship is as difficult as it sounds. Modeling plays a large role in the time and effort it takes to create spaceships and other complex engineering systems. It requires extensive physics calculations, sifting through a multitude of different models and tribal knowledge to determine singular parts of a system's design. (2020-11-23)

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