Current Afford Prescribed Medications News and Events

Current Afford Prescribed Medications News and Events, Afford Prescribed Medications News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
New delivery method promises relief from antipsychotic medication's adverse side effects
A team of neuroscientists and engineers at McMaster University has created a nasal spray to deliver antipsychotic medication directly to the brain instead of having it pass through the body. (2021-01-15)

New combination drug therapy offers hope against methamphetamine addiction
A new treatment that combines two existing medications may provide long-sought relief for many battling debilitating methamphetamine use disorder, according to a study to be published tomorrow in The New England Journal of Medicine. (2021-01-14)

Treatment for chronic pain must address both physical and social pain
Physical pain and social pain may be more closely related than previously thought. Social pain, which typically results from interpersonal rejection or abuse, has been viewed as a non-medical response to external factors. However, recent research suggests that some physical and social stress responses may arise because of shared processing in the brain. (2021-01-12)

Study finds commonly used blood pressure medications safe for COVID-19 patients
Medications to treat high blood pressure did not affect outcomes among patients hospitalized with COVID-19. The study is the first randomized controlled trial to show there is no risk for patients continuing these medications while hospitalized for COVID-19. (2021-01-07)

Hydroxychloroquine blood levels predict clotting risk in patients with lupus
A new study in Arthritis & Rheumatology shows that monitoring patients' blood levels of hydroxychloroquine can predict their clotting risk. (2021-01-06)

UCI study first to link disparities and 'pharmacy deserts' in California
In the United States, Black, Latino and low-income communities have historically lacked nearby access to pharmacy services. To provide the first record of these 'pharmacy deserts' in Los Angeles County, a University of California, Irvine study identified communities where the nearest pharmacy was at least one mile away. (2021-01-06)

Using artificial intelligence to find new uses for existing medications
Scientists have developed a machine-learning method that crunches massive amounts of data to help determine which existing medications could improve outcomes in diseases for which they are not prescribed. (2021-01-04)

Stopping RAS inhibitors tied to worse outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease
Small studies have suggested that a group of medications called RAS inhibitors may be harmful in persons with advanced chronic kidney disease, and physicians therefore often stop the treatment in such patients. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet now show that although stopping the treatment is linked to a lower risk of requiring dialysis, it is also linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular events and death. The results are published in The Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2020-12-29)

UC researcher urges caution using remdesivir to treat COVID-19
Research at the University of Cincinnati, however, contends that this antiviral drug is being used too indiscriminately when treating patients hospitalized with the virus. The study is published in the journal Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology. (2020-12-29)

Big bumblebees learn locations of best flowers
Big bumblebees take time to learn the locations of the best flowers, new research shows. (2020-12-28)

Neurology patients faced with rising out-of-pocket costs for tests, office visits
Just like with drug costs, the amount of money people pay out-of-pocket for diagnostic tests and office visits for neurologic conditions has risen over 15 years, according to a new study published in the December 23, 2020, online issue of issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-12-23)

Researchers determine how often cancer patients develop osteonecrosis of the jaw
A landmark study by researchers from the SWOG Cancer Research Network, a cancer clinical trials group funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has found that 2.8 percent of patients on average develop osteonecrosis of the jaw, or ONJ, within three years of starting a common treatment for cancer that has spread to the bone. (2020-12-17)

Researchers identify predictors of timely enrollment in treatment for opioid use disorder
Frequent doctor visits were associated with timely treatment, while prior overdose, alcohol use disorder and back problems predicted non-enrollment, study finds. (2020-12-16)

Women face higher risk of death or heart failure following a heart attack: study
Women face a 20 per cent higher risk than men of dying or having heart failure during the five years following a heart attack, according to a new study from University of Alberta cardiology researchers. (2020-12-15)

Mail-order medications often exposed to unsafe temperatures, study shows
Mail-order prescriptions shipped in standard bubble-padded envelopes during winter and summer months are likely to spend a substantial portion of time outside the recommended safe temperature range for most medications, according to research presented at the American Society for Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) Midyear Clinical Meeting and Exhibition. (2020-12-10)

UCI, UCSD study: People more likely to pick up prescriptions via automated kiosks
Ever see long lines at the pharmacy counter and give up on a medication, or find that the drive is just a little too long? A study by the University of California, Irvine and UC San Diego found that patients using an automated kiosk in their workplace had better prescription pickup rates without sacrificing instruction from pharmacists. (2020-12-10)

Mastectomy and reconstructive surgery may lead to patients becoming persistent drug users
Women who receive mastectomy and reconstructive surgery as part of breast cancer treatment may face the risk of developing persistent use of opioids and sedative-hypnotic drugs, according to data presented at the 2020 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2020-12-09)

Almost a third of young adults with asthma are ignoring COVID-19 guidelines, says survey
Almost a third of young adults with asthma are ignoring COVID-19 guidelines, says survey (2020-12-09)

Drug for rare disorder shows promise for treating herpes viruses
New research shows that the antiviral activity of the drug -- called phenylbutyrate, or PBA -- was even better when used along with acyclovir, a common HSV-1 treatment. When used in combination, less acyclovir is needed to effectively suppress the virus compared to acyclovir alone -- this is important because acyclovir is also known to have toxic side effects in the kidneys. (2020-12-07)

Researchers uncover significant reason older adults are at greater risk of heart attack
A team of surgeons has found an insufficient level of the protein Sesn2 is the reason older individuals are at greater risk of heart attack, which indicates stabilizing the protein could be the answer to maintaining a healthy heart. (2020-12-03)

Clinical trial results address concerns about pharmacogenetic testing
Researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial of pharmacogenetic testing related to cholesterol-lowering medications called statins.After one year, the cholesterol levels in the group who received their pharmacogenetic results were not higher than those in the group who did not receive their results, and they were not less likely to receive medical care meeting recommended guidelines. (2020-12-03)

After CDC guidance, little change in opioid prescriptions to those at risk of misuse
Research from Saint Louis University finds that among patients at risk for opioid misuse, the odds of receiving a Schedule II opioid (those with high abuse potential) for non-cancer pain were similar to those not at risk, despite new prescribing guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). (2020-12-02)

Statins can save lives, are they being used?
People who have coronary artery disease, stroke or peripheral artery disease often are prescribed a statin, a cholesterol-lowering drug that reduces the risk of heart attack or stroke. (2020-12-01)

Poverty and honesty are not opposites
Does poverty cause lying? An international research team led by behavioral economist Agne Kajackaite from the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Suparee Boonmanunt (Mahidol University, Bangkok) and Stephan Meier (Columbia Business School) examined whether poverty-stricken individuals were especially prone to acts of dishonesty. The researchers ran a field experiment with rice farmers in Thailand which incentivized cheating during a card game. They found that poverty itself did not cause individuals to act dishonestly. (2020-11-27)

Study: COVID-19 infection combined with blood clots worsen patient outcomes
While respiratory issues continue to be the most common symptom of a COVID-19 infection, new research indicates the disease could also be associated with an increased tendency of the blood to clot, leading to a higher risk of death from COVID-19. (2020-11-23)

The danger of Z-drugs for dementia patients
Strong sleeping pills known as 'Z-drugs' are linked with an increased risk of falls, fractures and stroke among people with dementia, according to new research. Sleep disturbance is common among people with dementia and the impact for patients and their families is significant. To date there are no proven effective treatments available, however people with dementia are often prescribed Z-drugs (zopiclone, zaleplon, and zolpidem). The new study reveals that stronger doses of these drugs are linked with an increased risk of adverse effects. (2020-11-23)

More than 1.1 million deaths among Medicare recipients due to high cost of drugs
WASHINGTON, DC and SAN DIEGO, CA - Nov. 19, 2020 - More than 1.1 million Medicare patients could die over the next decade because they cannot afford to pay for their prescription medications, according to a new study released today by the West Health Policy Center, a nonprofit and nonpartisan policy research group and Xcenda, the research arm of the drug distributor AmerisourceBergen. (2020-11-19)

Diagnosing the cause of exercise-induced respiratory symptoms
Exercise?induced respiratory symptoms are common in childhood, and it can be difficult to diagnose their cause. A study published in Pediatric Pulmonology found that the diagnoses proposed by primary care physicians are often not the same as the final diagnoses after specialist referrals. (2020-11-18)

Remotely delivered program improves blood pressure, cholesterol control in 5,000 patients
A team from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Mass General Brigham Health System, led by Brigham cardiologist Benjamin Scirica, MD, MPH, developed a program that provides an end-to-end solution to improve blood pressure and cholesterol levels across a broad population of patients at high cardiovascular risk. (2020-11-17)

Patient engagement program for heart failure patients improved outcomes
Nearly half of patients who received support through a patient engagement tool prior to a cardiology clinic visit had a positive change in their medication therapy compared to less than a third among patients who did not receive the engagement tool. The most common medication change was to increase the dose of generic medications already prescribed. (2020-11-17)

Suffering in silence: two-thirds of older adults say they won't treat their depression
A new nationwide poll, the GeneSight Mental Health Monitor, shows that nearly two-thirds (61%) of Americans age 65 or older who have concerns about having depression will not seek treatment. In fact, nearly 1 in 3 (33%) seniors who are concerned they might be suffering from depression believe they can ''snap out'' of it on their own. (2020-11-16)

Pharmacy dropboxes can help improve proper drug disposal, PSU study finds
Drug take-back boxes are a safe and secure way to dispose of unwanted medications, but a new Portland State University study shows awareness of these dropboxes as well as knowledge about risks of improper disposal remain low. (2020-11-16)

New study confirms combo pill alone and with aspirin lowers heart disease risk
A ''polypill'' is a single pill that includes multiple medications to control more than one health risk factor (such as heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, Type 2 diabetes, kidney disease, stroke). In this large, international trial, the polypill included blood pressure and cholesterol lowering medications for people at risk for heart disease. Results from the randomized, placebo-controlled trial show that the combination of a polypill plus aspirin reduced cardiovascular disease by 31%, and the polypill without aspirin reduced CVD by 21%. (2020-11-13)

Taking a scalpel to opioid painkiller risks: New studies show progress and opportunity
Several new studies add to the understanding of risks from surgical opioids, and show what happens when surgical teams work together to reduce the emphasis on, and supply of, opioid painkillers while still seeking to ease surgery patients' pain. (2020-11-10)

Under-insured transgender americans turn to riskier sources for gender-affirming hormones
Transgender people who lack access to insurance coverage for gender-affirming hormone therapy are more likely to use hormones from sources other than a licensed prescriber, compared to those with insurance coverage. (2020-11-10)

Prescriptions of antipsychotic medications in young children is declining
The use of antipsychotics in young children is declining but doctors continue to prescribe these medications off-label for conditions not approved by the Food and Drug Administration and without the recommended psychiatric consultation, a Rutgers study found. (2020-11-09)

Healthy habits are key to maintaining health even while taking multiple prescriptions
A healthy diet, regular exercise and not smoking contribute to maintaining overall health regardless of how many medications a person takes. Although a patient might be taking multiple prescriptions for various conditions to maintain their health, a healthy lifestyle is an important factor for decreasing the risk of death from any cause. (2020-11-09)

Patients reported international hydroxychloroquine shortages due to COVID-19
A new study shows that patients with rheumatic diseases across Africa, Southeast Asia, the Americas and Europe had trouble filling their prescriptions of antimalarial drugs, including hydroxychloroquine, during the 2020 global coronavirus pandemic, when antimalarials were touted as a possible COVID-19 treatment. Patients who could not access their antimalarial drugs faced worse physical and mental health outcomes as a result. (2020-11-06)

Tuberculosis screening needed for methotrexate users in at-risk locales
New research presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting, shows that tuberculosis (TB) screening and ongoing clinical care is needed for people on methotrexate who live in areas where the highly infectious illness is common. Methotrexate users who also take corticosteroids or other immunosuppressant therapies are at particular risk and need adequate TB screening. (2020-11-06)

New study reveals poisoning exposures in Australian schools
New research from the University of Sydney has found poisoning exposures in children and adolescents while at school are relatively common and appear to be increasing, highlighting the need for more robust prevention measures. (2020-11-02)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.