Current Affordable Care Act News and Events | Page 2

Current Affordable Care Act News and Events, Affordable Care Act News Articles.
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Understanding declining teenage pregnancies in England
Declining rates of teenage pregnancies in England are related to local areas experiencing less youth unemployment, growing Black or South Asian teenage populations, more educational attainment, unaffordable housing, and a lack of available social housing, a recent study has found. (2020-11-10)

Diseases of despair diagnoses increase in Pennsylvania
Medical diagnoses involving alcohol-related disorders, substance-related disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviors -- commonly referred to as diseases of despair -- increased in Pennsylvania health insurance claims between the years 2007 and 2018, according to researchers from Penn State Clinical and Translational Science Institute and Highmark Health Enterprise Analytics. (2020-11-10)

Potentially preventable hospitalizations among older adults: 2010-2014
When complications due to diabetes, asthma, urinary tract infections, high blood pressure and other common conditions lead patients to visit the ER, researchers and health care quality administrators may label these visits as ''potentially preventable hospitalizations.'' That is, with good outpatient care, these visits could have been potentially avoided. Potentially preventable hospitalizations are costly and can negatively impact the health and well-being of individuals, particularly if they are older. (2020-11-10)

Study finds surprising diversity in early child care
A new study of kindergarteners in one Midwestern state identified seven different pathways the children took in their early education and care before arriving at school. The researchers were surprised by the diverse experiences that kids brought with them to kindergarten: While some received care only in their home or mainly in a child care center, others switched back and forth between different types of care, or had other arrangements. (2020-11-09)

Changes in birth rates after elimination of cost sharing for contraception
Researchers assessed changes in birth rates by income level among commercially insured women before and after the elimination of cost sharing for contraception under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. (2020-11-06)

Expanded birth control coverage may help reduce disparities in unplanned pregnancies
Removing out-of-pocket costs for contraception may help reduce the income-related disparities that play such a significant role in unintended pregnancies, a new Michigan Medicine-led study suggests. (2020-11-06)

Changes in cancer survival after Medicaid expansion
Researchers compared the rate of death for patients diagnosed with breast, colorectal or lung cancer and living in states that expanded Medicaid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act with states that didn't. (2020-11-05)

Medicaid expansion linked to lower mortality rates for three major types of cancer
In states that have expanded Medicaid availability as part of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), mortality rates for three major forms of cancer are significantly lower than in states that have not expanded their Medicaid, a new study by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard University shows (2020-11-05)

ACA results in fewer low-income uninsured, but non-urgent ER visits haven't changed
Since the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Medicaid expansion program went into effect 10 years ago, the U.S. has seen a larger reduction in the number of uninsured low-income, rural residents, compared to their urban contemporaries. But the likelihood of repeated visits to emergency rooms for non-urgent reasons has not decreased. (2020-11-05)

ACA's expansion of Medicaid improved maternal health
The period of time before pregnancy is critically important for the health of a woman and her infant, yet not all women have access to health insurance during this time. New research finds that the expansion of Medicaid for many states under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) had a positive impact on a variety of indicators of maternal health prior to conception. (2020-11-02)

People with disabilities view health care access as human right, study shows
Analysis of national survey data of Americans with disabilities finds they overwhelmingly view health care access as a human right, but many barriers stand in their way, including insurance tied to employment and policy makers not listening. They also view the ACA positively, even though they span the political spectrum. (2020-10-27)

Renewable energy targets can undermine sustainable intentions
Renewable energy targets (RETs) may be too blunt a tool for ensuring a sustainable future, according to University of Queensland-led research. PhD candidate Scott Spillias, from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said that, while RETs are a go-to for policymakers, more nuanced approaches were more effective at actually achieving holistic, sustainable outcomes. (2020-10-27)

Racial, socioeconomic disparities in extensive-stage small cell lung cancer treatment
A new study shows that Black individuals with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer are less likely to receive chemotherapy for their disease compared to white and other racial groups. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, the results indicate that individuals who are Black, elderly, uninsured, or have non-private health insurance and lower education levels, were less likely to be treated with chemotherapy for this type of lung cancer. (2020-10-26)

Healthcare as a climate solution
Although the link may not be obvious, healthcare and climate change -- two issues that pose major challenges around the world -- are in fact more connected than society may realize. So say researchers, who are increasingly proving this to be true. (2020-10-26)

Poor women in Bangladesh reluctant to use healthcare
A study, published in PLOS ONE, found that the women living in Dhaka slums were reluctant to use institutionalised maternal health care for fear of having to make undocumented payments, unfamiliar institutional processes, lack of social and family support, matters of honour and shame, a culture of silence and inadequate spousal communication on health issues. (2020-10-23)

Why do white Americans support both strict immigration policies and dream act?
White Americans support strict immigration policies while at the same time favor the DREAM Act that would grant legal status to some immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, a contradiction linked to racial resentment and the belief that equality already exists, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-10-22)

Axing the ACA means young adults with cancer lose coverage
A new study led by UCSF Benioff Children's Hospitals and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has quantified the impact of repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) for 18 to 25-year-old cancer patients, who are covered by their parents' health insurance. (2020-10-22)

Report calls for easing access, improving home health for older adults
Older adults have suffered disproportionately from the COVID-19 pandemic, with increased risk of severe illness and death reported across the globe. A new report argues that one policy change made during the pandemic should remain in place after the novel coronavirus virus fades away: better access to home health services through Medicare. In a set of recommendations published by the Commonwealth Fund, researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and Duke University argue for regulatory changes to expand the Medicare home health benefit. (2020-10-22)

Study reveals disparities in access to high-quality surgical care
Among U.S. patients diagnosed with breast, prostate, lung, or colorectal cancer from 2004 to 2016, those who were uninsured or had Medicare or Medicaid were less likely than privately insured patients to receive surgical care at high-volume hospitals. The findings are published in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-10-21)

Study: More than 200 million Americans could have toxic PFAS in their drinking water
A peer-reviewed study by scientists at the Environmental Working Group estimates that more than 200 million Americans could have the toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS in their drinking water at a concentration of 1 part per trillion, or ppt, or higher. Independent scientific studies have recommended a safe level for PFAS in drinking water of 1 ppt, a standard that is endorsed by EWG. (2020-10-16)

Chemists create new crystal form of insecticide, boosting its ability to fight mosquitoes and malaria
Through a simple process of heating and cooling, New York University researchers have created a new crystal form of deltamethrin -- a common insecticide used to control malaria -- resulting in an insecticide that is up to 12 times more effective against mosquitoes than the existing form. (2020-10-12)

Women, workers of color filling most 'high-hazard/low-reward' jobs in Washington
When exploring data on Washington workers during the pandemic -- demographics, working conditions, wages and benefits, and risks of exposure to disease -- the authors of a new report found that women hold two-thirds of the jobs in the harshest category of work. (2020-10-05)

Long-term care after Medicaid expansion
This observational study looked at the association between Medicaid expansion under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and long-term home health care and nursing home use among newly eligible low-income adults and older adults whose eligibility did not change. (2020-10-01)

The proof is in the pudding
As Australia's aged care sector continues to be scrutinised, researchers at the University of South Australia show that plain solutions are often the best, with a new study finding that aged care residents can improve their nutrition intake simply by increasing their meal sizes. (2020-09-30)

ACA reduced out-of-pocket health costs for families with kids, but they still need help
The percentage of low- and middle-income families with children that had burdensome out-of-pocket health care costs fell following the 2014 implementation of the health insurance marketplaces and Medicaid expansion provisions of the Affordable Care Act, known widely as Obamacare. (2020-09-28)

Proof-of-concept for a new ultra-low-cost hearing aid for age-related hearing loss
A new ultra-affordable and accessible hearing aid made from open-source electronics could soon be available worldwide, according to a study published September 23, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Soham Sinha from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia, US, and colleagues. (2020-09-23)

Study suggests financial holdings influenced key votes for house lawmakers
A recent study found strong associations between the financial holdings of legislators in the US House of Representatives and how those lawmakers voted on key financial legislation. The study suggests that many lawmakers voted in ways that benefited their personal finances, regardless of whether those votes were consistent with their espoused politics. (2020-09-15)

Telehealth supports collaborative mental health care in the needs of rural patients
Traditionally, primary care clinics connect patients who have mental health care needs to specialists like psychiatrists in a collaborative care model. However, rural clinics often lack the workforce capacity to provide collaborative behavioral health services. In a new qualitative study, rural Washington primary care clinics adopted telehealth methods to connect remotely with specialists. The study found that telepsychiatric collaboration prepared primary care physicians and rural clinic staff to deliver high quality mental health care in underserved areas. (2020-09-15)

As domestic violence spikes, many victims and their children have nowhere to live
COVID-19 has left many victims of domestic violence facing difficulties feeding their children and accessing services for safe housing, transportation and childcare once they leave shelters, according to a Rutgers study published in the journal Violence Against Women. (2020-09-14)

COPD program decreases 30-day hospital readmission, may increase mortality
The 30-day readmission rate for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has decreased but the mortality rate has increased. Hospitals, in seeking to avoid financial penalties by reducing readmissions, may inadvertently affect minority and disadvantaged patients. (2020-09-10)

A spillover effect: Medicaid expansion leads to healthier dietary choices
Besides providing health care to millions, the Medicaid program helps recipients make healthier food choices, according to work UConn research recently published in the journal Health Economics. (2020-09-08)

Benefits likely outweigh costs for national monuments in the American west
New peer-reviewed research describes the history of the 1906 Antiquities Act (used to create national monuments), the controversies that have swirled around monument designation, and findings in the peer-reviewed literature about their impacts on surrounding communities. (2020-09-08)

Medicaid expansion improved insurance stability for low-income pregnant women
Medicaid expansion improved the stability of insurance coverage for low-income women in the months leading up to and right after their baby's birth. Findings showed that with the expansion of Medicaid, there was a 10- percentage-point decrease in women going uninsured or changing insurance plans in the time around their pregnancy. This is the first study to examine Medicaid's impact on the stability of insurance from before to after childbirth. (2020-09-08)

Half of Medicare patients do not receive recommended health care after hospitalization
A study published today by the JAMA Network Open shows that in the period from October 2015 to September 2016 before the Affordable Care Act, a substantial portion of Medicare patients referred to home health care after hospitalization did not receive that care. (2020-09-02)

After Medicaid expansion, 'unmet need' for joint replacement surgery
States that have expanded Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act have seen an 'early surge in demand' for hip and knee replacement surgery, reports a study in the September 2, 2020 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2020-09-02)

Sunflower oil shows unexpected efficiency in corrosion prevention
Sunflower oil, which is found in almost every home, can be used not only in cooking, everyday life and cosmetology - it will help avoid complications (gas hydrates and corrosion) during oil and gas production. Scientists of the priority area of Kazan University intend to apply inhibitors developed on its basis in harsh Arctic conditions. (2020-08-28)

Internet-of-Things air quality sensor that could save the lives of babies and ast
Scientists at the University of Sussex have collaborated with an Oxford company, M-SOLV, and a team of scientists from across Europe to develop a highly sensitive, accurate and affordable carbon-based Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) sensor. (2020-08-24)

Veterans undergoing elective PCI at community hospitals may have increased chance of death compared to those treated at VA hospitals
Veterans who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable angina at a community facility were at a 33% increased hazard, or chance, of death compared to patients treated within the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, according to an analysis of nearly 9,000 veterans published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2020-08-24)

Medicaid expansion and outpatient surgical care
This observational study examined the association between state participation in Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act and changes in the use of surgical care for common outpatient procedures. (2020-08-19)

Affordable Care Act key to keeping people insured amid COVID 19-related job losses
Widespread layoffs amid the COVID-19 pandemic threaten to cut off millions of people from their employer-sponsored health insurance plans. But the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will protect many of these people and their families from losing coverage, according to a new study. (2020-08-19)

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