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Current Africa News and Events, Africa News Articles.
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Many asylum seekers suffer from depression and anxiety symptoms
According to the internationally most extensive population study concerning the health of asylum seekers, up to 40% of the adults who have sought asylum in Finland told that they are suffering from major depression and anxiety symptoms. (2019-06-19)
Study reveals global disparities in cervical cancer rates among women with HIV
A new International Journal of Cancer study indicates that rates of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) are particularly high in women living with HIV in South Africa or Latin America. (2019-06-19)
South African forests show pathways to a sustainable future
Native forests make up 1percent of the landscape in South Africa but could play a key role in reducing atmospheric carbon and identifying sustainable development practices that can be used globally to counter climate change, according to a Penn State researcher. (2019-06-19)
Triple-negative breast cancer among black women in the US varies by birthplace
A new study finds substantial variation in the prevalence of triple-negative breast cancer among black women with breast cancer by birthplace in the United States. (2019-06-13)
Extreme heat to hit one third of the african urban population
Climate change, population growth and urbanisation are instrumental in increasing exposure to extreme temperatures. (2019-06-05)
Is there a demographic need for migration in Europe?
A European Commission-IIASA flagship report has found that an increase in the EU population aged 65+ is certain -- regardless of higher fertility or migration. (2019-06-04)
Female cannabis users underrepresented in health research, study reveals
Research at the University of York has shown that women are underrepresented in research into links between cannabis and psychosis, which could limit understanding of the impact of the drug. (2019-06-04)
Stellenbosch University researchers study resistance to 'protect' anti-TB drug
Scientists from Stellenbosch University are trying to conserve the life-saving treatment bedaquiline, by studying how the bacterium that causes TB can develop resistance to this drug. (2019-05-30)
Multi-step spread of first herders into sub-Saharan Africa
An analysis of 41 ancient African genomes led by Mary Prendergast and David Reich suggests that the spread of herding and farming into eastern Africa affected human populations in phases, involving multiple movements of -- and gene flow among -- ancestrally distinct groups. (2019-05-30)
Ancient DNA tells the story of the first herders and farmers in east Africa
A collaborative study led by archaeologists, geneticists and museum curators is providing answers to previously unsolved questions about life in sub-Saharan Africa thousands of years ago. (2019-05-30)
Ancient DNA illuminates first herders and farmers in east Africa
Genome-wide analyses of 41 ancient sub-Saharan Africans answer questions left murky by archaeological records about the origins of the people who introduced food production -- first herding and then farming -- into East Africa over the past 5,000 years. (2019-05-30)
African mole-rats immune to 'wasabi pain'
A new report in Science provides the first evidence of a mammal -- the highveld mole-rat -- being immune to pain from exposure to allyl isothiocyanate, or AITC, the active ingredient of wasabi. (2019-05-30)
Continent drift and plateau uplift drive evolutions of Asia-Africa-Australia monsoon and arid regions
Monsoon and arid regions in the Asia-Africa-Australia realm occupy more than 60% of the total area of these continents. (2019-05-28)
Africa's elephant poaching rates in decline, but iconic animal still under threat
Elephant poaching rates in Africa have started to decline after reaching a peak in 2011, an international team of scientists have concluded. (2019-05-28)
Factors associated with elephant poaching
Study associates illegal hunting rates in Africa with levels of poverty, corruption and ivory demand. (2019-05-28)
Tortoises on the menu
An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig and the University of Osnabrück, Germany, have observed wild chimpanzees in the Loango National Park, Gabon, eating tortoises. (2019-05-23)
Rare volcanic rocks lift lid on dangers of little-studied eruptions
Unusual rocks discovered on a remote mountainside have alerted scientists to the dangers posed by a little-studied type of volcano. (2019-05-23)
A considerable percentage of deaths in HIV patients are due to cryptococcal infections
Cryptococcal meningitis causes about one in ten HIV-related deaths, according to a study of autopsies performed in Mozambique and Brazil and coordinated by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by 'la Caixa'. (2019-05-21)
Earliest evidence of the cooking and eating of starch
New discoveries made at the Klasies River Cave in South Africa's southern Cape, where charred food remains from hearths were found, provide the first archaeological evidence that anatomically modern humans were roasting and eating plant starches, such as those from tubers and rhizomes, as early as 120,000 years ago. (2019-05-17)
'Striking' differences in rates of HIV/AIDS within African nations
Despite the rapid scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) since 2000, HIV/AIDS is still the most common cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa, according to data from the Global Burden of Disease. (2019-05-15)
Detection of unusual hybrid schistosomes in Malawi
LSTM's Professor Russell Stothard is senior author on a new paper in which researchers from the UK and Malawi have described the unusual occurrence of novel schistosome hybrids infecting children along the Shire River Valley. (2019-05-09)
New species of fish parasite named after Xena, the warrior princess
A study of crustacean parasites attaching themselves inside the branchial cavities (the gills) of their fish hosts was conducted in order to reveal potentially unrecognised diversity of the genus Elthusa in South Africa. (2019-05-07)
Groundbreaking study could lead to fast, simple test for Ebola virus
In a breakthrough that could lead to a simple and inexpensive test for Ebola virus disease, researchers have generated two antibodies to the deadly virus. (2019-05-07)
Genome analysis of yams reveals new cradle of crop domestication in West Africa
Yams as seen today in West Africa descended from a forest species, a new study finds. (2019-05-01)
Intervention increases healthy behavior among South African adolescents
Once plagued by malaria and tuberculosis, Sub-Saharan Africa now sees non-communicable diseases like diabetes and heart disease as some of the leading causes of death. (2019-04-26)
Wristband samplers show similar chemical exposure across three continents
After Oregon State University researchers deployed chemicals to individuals on three continents, they found that no two wristbands had identical chemical detections. (2019-04-22)
Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore
Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. (2019-04-18)
More policy work needed to reduce use of smokeless tobacco, say researchers
Researchers at the University of York have shown that regulations on smokeless tobacco are still lacking, despite 181 countries agreeing to a common approach to controlling the demand and supply. (2019-04-03)
New Bombali ebolavirus found in Kenyan bat
Researchers have identified Bombali ebolavirus in an Angolan free-tailed bat captured in the Taita Hills, southeast Kenya. (2019-04-02)
Scientists confirm first report of egg parasitoid in Africa to fight fall armyworm
Scientists have confirmed the first report of an egg parasitoid Telenomus remus in Africa which could prove an important biological weapon in the fight against the devastating fall armyworm that threatens food security of more than 200 million people. (2019-04-01)
New ebolavirus, found in bats, more widespread than thought
A University of Arkansas biologist found a newly discovered species of ebolavirus, named Bombali, in a bat caught in Kenya. (2019-04-01)
Research into tropical eye worm yields new tests to assess safety of anti-filarial drugs
Researchers at the LSTM's Centre for Drugs and Diagnostics, and University of Buea, Cameroon have developed new models of the tropical eye worm, Loa loa for the development of new drugs against filariasis. (2019-03-29)
Study finds white sharks with high levels of mercury, arsenic and lead in their blood
Researchers found high concentrations of mercury, arsenic, and lead, in blood samples obtained from Great white sharks in South Africa. (2019-03-29)
WHO guidelines fail to detect half of chronic hepatitis B patients in Ethiopia needing treatment
Current World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for chronic hepatitis B (CHB) fail to detect half of the patients in need of treatment in Ethiopia, report scientists in the Journal of Hepatology, published by Elsevier. (2019-03-28)
New model predicts substantial reduction of malaria transmitting mosquitoes
In much of sub-Saharan Africa, malaria is a huge public health burden. (2019-03-28)
Dramatic housing transformation in sub-Saharan Africa revealed for first time
Housing with improved water and sanitation, sufficient living area and durable construction has doubled in sub-Saharan Africa between 2000 and 2015, according to new research published in Nature. (2019-03-27)
Overland migration of Arctic Terns revealed
Data from a landmark three year study of the world's longest migrating seabird reveals how overland migration is an integral part of their amazing journey. (2019-03-25)
Immigrant women more likely to be overweight during pregnancy
A new study in the Journal of Public Health finds that women in Norway from immigrant backgrounds are more likely to be overweight during pregnancy. (2019-03-21)
Researchers shed new light on the origins of modern humans
The work, published in Scientific Reports, confirms a dispersal of Homo sapiens from southern to eastern Africa immediately preceded the out-of-Africa migration (2019-03-20)
US indoor climate most similar to northeast African outdoors
Americans are most comfortable when their indoor climate is like the northeast African outdoors -- warm and relatively dry. (2019-03-20)
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