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Current Aggression News and Events, Aggression News Articles.
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Two hormones drive anemonefish fathering, aggression
Two brain-signaling molecules control how anemonefish dads care for their young and respond to nest intruders, researchers report in a new study. Because there are many similarities in brain structure between fish and humans, the findings offer insight into the fundamental nature of parental care, the scientists say. (2020-03-16)

Zoology: Western gorillas may be territorial
Groups of western gorillas may defend the centres of their home ranges against neighbouring groups, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. These findings may suggest that western gorillas are territorial. (2020-03-12)

Animal behavior: Anxieties and problematic behaviors may be common in pet dogs
Anxieties and behavior problems may be common across dog breeds, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. The findings suggest that noise sensitivity is the most common anxiety trait, followed by fear. (2020-03-05)

Reducing problem behaviors for children with autism
Self-inflicted injury, aggression toward others and yelling are common problem behaviors associated with young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. These actions can result from the child being denied attention or access to items they enjoy, as well as from internal discomfort or environmental stressors such as noise or large crowds. (2020-03-04)

There's a better way to think about being kept waiting at work
Generally, abstract thinking leads to better outcomes, such as more creativity, wider vision and feeling more powerful. However, in the paper published in the Journal of Organizational Behavior (2020), Efrat-Triester, and UBC researchers Michael Daniels and Sandra Robinson demonstrate that abstract thinking can also lead to undesired outcomes in stressful situations, such as waiting. (2020-02-24)

A study of economic compensation for victims of sexual violence in Europe
A study carried out by researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) analyzes the efficiency of the Spanish system of economically compensating the victims of sexual violence. This work has been undertaken within the framework of FAIRCOM, a European project coordinated by the UC3M. (2020-02-24)

Paying attention to complaints can protect nurses from violence
New UBC research shows, for the first time, a clear link between patient complaints and violence towards nurses. When nurses are overworked, they often cannot provide the high level of care they want to. This may lead to complaints from patients and their families, which can escalate into violence if not addressed. By addressing these complaints and reducing workload pressures, health care organizations could improve the wellbeing of their patients, patients' families, and employees. (2020-02-20)

How ants get angry: Precise 'lock and key' process regulates aggression, acceptance
In a new study, scientists at Vanderbilt report definitive evidence of a mechanism within ants that is responsible for unlocking aggression. The research--the first to pinpoint this mechanism and its precise role in ant biology--reports a social characteristic which could help account for their evolutionary success. (2020-02-03)

Moongoose females compete over reproduction
A new study on wild banded mongooses reveals that females may use spontaneous abortion to cope with reproductive competition, and to save their energy for future breeding attempts in better conditions. (2019-12-13)

What is a scream? The acoustics of a primal human call
Listeners show strong agreement for parameters of a scream, including a higher pitch, roughness and a higher peak frequency. (2019-12-05)

Fighting fruit flies: Aggressive behavior influenced by previous interactions
Aggression doesn't just depend on who you are or who you're interacting with but also depends on your previous interactions, a new University of Guelph fruit fly study has found. (2019-11-27)

Leadership's in the blood for tiny fish
Leadership during cooperation runs in the family for tiny fish called Trinidadian guppies, new research shows. (2019-11-20)

Whether direct or indirect, parental alienation harms families
In one particular form of family violence, a parent tries to damage a child's relationship with the other parent. The outcome of these behaviors is called parental alienation, and it can result in a child's ultimate rejection of a parent for untrue, illogical or exaggerated reasons. Jennifer Harman, a Colorado State University social psychologist who studies parental alienation and its consequences, has published new research showing that mothers and fathers use slightly different tactics when engaging in these destructive behaviors. (2019-11-04)

New species take longer to arise in the Amazon
Amazonia is home to the greatest number of species on earth, many now threatened, but a new study published Oct. 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Jason Weir from the University of Toronto and Trevor Price from the University of Chicago hammers home Amazonia's importance, showing that it is not only a place with many species, but one where it has taken an exceptionally long time for new species to form. (2019-10-22)

Pitt study: Sexual selection alone could spark formation of new species
Because of imprinted preferences, strawberry poison frog females mate more with similar colored males, and less with differently colored males. Over time, the behavior could lead to two color types becoming separate species. (2019-10-17)

Male and female mice have different brain cells
Scientists discover that a brain region known to control sex and violence contains rare cell types that differ in male versus female mice. (2019-10-17)

Aggressive and agitated behaviors in dementia are better treated without medications
Nonpharmacologic treatments, such as massage and touch therapy, seemed to be more effective than pharmacologic treatments for reducing aggression and agitation in adults with dementia. Findings from a systematic review and meta-analysis are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2019-10-14)

Non-pharmacologic treatments may be more effective for psychiatric symptoms of dementia
A systematic review and meta-analysis, led by St. Michael's Hospital of Unity Health Toronto and the University of Calgary, suggests outdoor activities were more clinically effective than anti-psychotic medication for treating physical aggression in patients with dementia. For patients with physical agitation, massage and touch therapy were more efficacious than usual care or caregiver support. (2019-10-14)

Genes play a role in dog breed differences in behavior
Border collies are highly trainable, greyhounds love to chase, and German shepherds make good guard dogs. While the environment plays a role, traits like these are highly heritable, according to a study of 101 dog breeds by a team of researchers including James Serpell of the University of Pennsylvania. The work identifies 131 genetic variants associated with breed differences in behavior. (2019-10-08)

Imprinting on mothers may drive new species formation in poison dart frogs
By rearing frogs with parents -- or foster parents -- of different colors, a team from the University of Pittsburgh working at the Smithsonian in Panama discovered that behavior in response to color may be more important than genetics in the evolution of new species. (2019-10-03)

Fish fathers exhibit signatures of 'baby brain' that may facilitate parental care behavior
Many new parents are familiar with terms like 'baby brain' or 'mommy brain' that hint at an unavoidable decline in cognitive function associated with the hormonal changes of pregnancy, childbirth, and maternal caregiving. A new study of parental care in stickleback fish is a reminder that such parenting-induced changes in the brain and associated shifts in cognition and behavior are not just for females -- and they're not just for mammals either. (2019-09-30)

The problem with promoting 'responsible dog ownership'
Dog welfare campaigns that tell people to be 'responsible owners' don't help to promote behaviour change, a new University of Liverpool report suggests. Dog owners interviewed for a study published in Anthrozoƶs all considered themselves to be responsible owners, despite there being great variation in key aspects of their dog-owning behaviour. (2019-09-24)

For lemurs, sex role reversal may get its start in the womb
In lemur society, it's not males but the females who are in charge. A new study of the role of hormones in aggression in lemurs from before birth to adulthood suggests female domination gets wired early, while lemurs are still in the womb. (2019-09-16)

Is time spent using social media associated with mental health problems among adolescents?
Adolescents who spend more than three hours a day using social media may be at higher risk for mental health problems. This observational study included a nationally representative sample of nearly 6,600 US adolescents (ages 12-15) who reported time spent on social media during a typical day and who reported information about mental health problems. (2019-09-11)

Study: Children born to older parents tend to have fewer behavior problems
A new Dutch study considered the behavior problems of children born to older parents. Specifically, researchers looked at externalizing behaviors (e.g., aggression) and internalizing behaviors (e.g., anxiety, depression) of children born to older parents when the youth were 10 to 12 years old. They found that children of older parents tend to have fewer externalizing behavior problems than children of younger parents. The researchers also found that parents' age was unrelated to children's internalizing behaviors. (2019-07-31)

Apathy: The forgotten symptom of dementia
Apathy is the most common neuropsychiatric symptom of dementia, with a bigger impact on function than memory loss -- yet it is under-researched and often forgotten in care. (2019-07-17)

Want to boost creativity? Try playing Minecraft
Video games that foster creative freedom can increase creativity under certain conditions, according to new research from Iowa State University. The experimental study compared the effect of playing Minecraft, with or without instruction, to watching a TV show or playing a race car video game. Those given the freedom to play Minecraft without instruction were most creative. (2019-07-08)

It's dog eat dog on the canine social ladder
Climbing the social ladder is a ruff business for dogs, new research shows. (2019-07-02)

Autism health challenges could be explained by problem behaviors
For years, researchers have documented both gastrointestinal issues and problematic behaviors, such as aggression, in many children with autism spectrum disorder. (2019-06-27)

Certain behaviors in kindergarten associated with lower adult salary
Inattention among kindergarteners was associated with lower earnings as adults in this study based on behavioral ratings from kindergarten teachers for 2,850 children in Canada at ages 5 or 6 and government tax returns for those same children as adults at ages 33 to 35. (2019-06-19)

Study: Behavior in kindergarten associated with earnings in adulthood
New study found that individuals who were inattentive at age 6 had lower earnings in their 30s after taking into consideration their IQ and family adversity. For males only, individuals who were physically aggressive or oppositional (e.g., who refused to share materials or blamed others) had lower annual earnings in their 30s. And males who were prosocial (e.g., who shared or helped) had higher later earnings. (2019-06-19)

Behavioural correlations of the domestication syndrome are decoupled in modern dog breeds
A new study published in Nature Communications by a team of researchers from Stockholm University used behavioural data from more than 76,000 dogs, to test the hypothesis that key behaviours in the domestication syndrome are correlated. (2019-06-07)

Study finds tie between attributing hostile intent and aggression in children and youth
Children who tend to attribute hostile motives to other people are more likely to display aggression, however, the strength of this relationship varies. A new meta-analysis sought to determine the relation between attributing hostile intent and aggressive behavior. (2019-06-05)

State alcohol policies may affect aggression- and driving-related harms from someone else's drinking
New research published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research suggests that state alcohol policies may be effective in reducing aggression-related and driving-related harms due to other drinkers, mainly in younger adults. (2019-06-05)

Advancing dementia and its effect on care home relationships
New research published today in the journal Dementia by researchers from the University of Chichester focuses on the effects of behavioral change due to dementia in a residential care home setting. Its findings are based on a survey of professional care-givers who shared their own experiences of the deterioration of the carer/cared-for relationship as dementia advances. (2019-06-03)

'Loser effect' evolves separate from fighting ability
The 'loser effect' -- which causes animals to shy away from violence after losing a fight -- evolves independently of any change in fighting ability, new research suggests. (2019-05-28)

Lack of evaluation in countering violent extremism may boost terror threat
A lack of evaluation of the impact of countering violent extremism (CVE) and counter-terrorism (CT) efforts may actually be increasing the threat and risk of terrorism, a new study points out. (2019-05-22)

Residential child care project addresses emotional pain without causing it
A model of care for children's residential agencies takes children's emotional pain into account and emphasizes the bond between the children and their caregivers. (2019-05-22)

Multiple sclerosis: Discovery of a mechanism responsible for chronic inflammation
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease. The defense system that usually protects patients from external aggression turns on its own cells and attacks them for reasons that are not yet known. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur have shown that ancient viruses are involved in the acute inflammatory defense response that may contribute to the disease. (2019-05-10)

For teens, online bullying worsens sleep and depression
Teens who experience cyberbullying are more likely to suffer from poor sleep, which in turn raises levels of depression, found a University at Buffalo study. (2019-05-09)

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