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Current Agriculture News and Events, Agriculture News Articles.
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New climate model helps researchers better predict water needs
New research from the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering combines climate and land use projections to predict water availability, information that is crucial for the preparations of resource managers and land-use planners. (2020-10-06)

Secret of plant dietary fibre structure revealed
Researchers from The University of Queensland and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have uncovered the mechanics of how plant cell walls balance the strength and rigidity provided by cellulose with its ability to stretch and compress. This discovery helps explain how plant structures can range from floppy grasses to hard wood trees and is important for understanding dietary fibre properties in nutrition. The findings also have applications in medicine, agriculture and a range of other industries. (2020-09-17)

Consumption of sheep or beef liver can contribute considerably to the total intake of PFAS
Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are industrial chemicals that have been used for decades in several industrial processes and consumer products due to their special technical properties. They are not easily degradable and are detectable everywhere: in the environ-ment, in the food chain and in humans. (2020-09-14)

Worldwide loss of phosphorus due to soil erosion quantified for the first time
Phosphorus is essential for agriculture, yet this important plant nutrient is increasingly being lost from soils around the world. The primary cause is soil erosion, reports an international research team led by the University of Basel. The study in the journal Nature Communications shows which continents and regions are most strongly affected. (2020-09-11)

Taste buds may play role in fostering obesity in offspring
Cornell food scientists show in animal studies that a mother's high-fat diet may lead to more sweet-taste receptors and a greater attraction to unhealthy food in their offspring - resulting in poor feeding behavior, obesity in adulthood. (2020-09-11)

True holographic movie is within grasp
Holographic movies, like the one R2D2 projected of Princess Leia in the Star Wars: A New Hope, have long been the province of science fiction, but for most of us, the extent of our experience with holograms may be the dime-sized stamps on our passports and credit cards. By using 'metasurface' materials that can manipulate light in ways that natural materials cannot, researchers reckon they have finally seen the light at the end of the tunnel for creating true holographic movies. (2020-08-31)

New method to combat damage, help revive NY berry industry
Greg Loeb of Cornell University has been experimenting with a thin mesh covering, called exclusion netting, around berry crops as a means to prevent spotted wing drosophila infestation. The efficacy of the netting is documented in a paper, 'Factors Affecting the Implementation of Exclusion Netting to Control Drosophila Suzukii on Primocane Raspberry,' published in the journal Crop Protection. (2020-08-26)

Researchers help inform cassava breeding worldwide
Scientists in Cornell University's NextGen Cassava project have uncovered new details regarding cassava's genetic architecture that may help breeders more easily pinpoint traits for one of Africa's key crops. (2020-08-25)

New approach uses wild genes to improve biological nitrogen fixation in soybeans
It's a clever genetic approach to identify genes present in the wild soybean ancestor that might improve or enhance interactions between the modern cultivated soybean and its symbiotic partner S. fredii. Soybean was domesticated so long ago that most cultivated lines lack these ancient traits. This approach will help them to access some of the genetic diversity of the soybean ancestor to improve biological nitrogen fixation of modern soybean cultivars. (2020-08-20)

One in 10 Tennessee families were food insufficient during early months of COVID-19
The latest research from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture indicates that during late April and early May 2020, approximately 525,000 Tennessee households were food insufficient, meaning they sometimes or often did not have enough to eat - that's one in 10 families. About 30% of these struggling households were food sufficient prior to the onset of the pandemic. (2020-08-19)

Tennessee agricultural sectors taking a hit from COVID-19
The latest research from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture indicates that the COVID-19 pandemic has affected all aspects of agricultural commodity production and distribution, leading to substantial price declines and reduced income for farmers. (2020-08-19)

Desert greenhouses offer growth opportunities
Efficient greenhouse complexes that will grow crops using the resources available on desert coasts could improve food security for millions. (2020-08-17)

Selective conversion of reactive lithium compounds made possible
Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have developed a new catalyst that can catalyse reactions to produce pharmaceuticals or chemicals used in agriculture. It creates carbon-carbon bonds between what are known as organolithium compounds without creating any unwanted by-products. (2020-08-12)

Identifying local solutions in the barotse floodplain for sustainable agriculture development
To develop locally relevant strategies that improve food security, nutrition, and conservation, researchers employed a gendered ecosystem services approach in Zambia. (2020-08-06)

Report provides new framework for understanding climate risks, impacts to US agriculture
A new USDA report focuses on how agricultural systems are impacted by climate change and offers a list of 20 indicators that provide a broad look at what's happening across the country. (2020-07-29)

New study provides valuable historical dataset for Yellow River water management
Researchers led by Prof. LIU Yu from the Institute of Earth Environment of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and their collaborators reconstructed natural runoff history for the middle reach of the YR from 1492 to 2013 CE to assess the effects of human activities. (2020-07-27)

UMD researcher highlights trends in consolidation of US agriculture with 35 years of data
In a new paper published in Applied Economics Perspectives and Policies, University of Maryland researcher Jim MacDonald presents a detailed history of the consolidation of agriculture in the US based on 35 years of data, with implications for all sectors of agriculture moving forward. Data show a steady shift to fewer and larger farming operations across crops, dairy, and livestock. (2020-07-23)

Keeping pinto beans away from the dark side
New slow-darkening pinto bean varieties show benefits for farmers and consumers (2020-07-22)

Science sweetens native honey health claims
Examination of honey from five different stingless bee species across Neotropical and Indo-Australian regions has enabled for the first time the identification of the unusual disaccharide trehalulose as a major component representing between 13 and 44 g per 100 g of each of these honeys. The previously unrecognised abundance of trehalulose in stingless bee honeys is concrete evidence that supports some of the reported health attributes of this product. This is the first identification of trehalulose as a major component within a food commodity. (2020-07-22)

Native bushland's fertility secret
In hotter, dryer conditions with climate change, a secret agent for more sustainable agricultural production could lie in harvesting the diverse beneficial soil microbiome in native bushland settings, scientists say. New research from CSIRO, Flinders University and La Trobe University highlights the importance of soil biological health and further potential to use organic rather than chemical farm inputs for crop production. (2020-07-20)

Changes in farming urgent to rescue biodiversity
Humans depend on farming for their survival but this activity takes up more than one-third of the world's landmass and endangers 62% of all threatened species. However, agricultural landscapes can support biodiversity. Over 360 scientists from 42 countries, led by the University of Göttingen and Westlake University, argue that agroecological principles should be integrated in the post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework to be decided at the 15th Convention of the Parties (COP15). Correspondence appeared in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2020-07-20)

Drones and artificial intelligence show promise for conservation of farmland bird nests
Every spring, a large number of ground-nests of farmland birds are accidentally destroyed by mechanical operations, such as ploughing and sowing. A new study from the University of Helsinki shows for the first time that such nests can be located using a drone in combination with artificial intelligence. (2020-07-14)

Agriculture - a climate villain? Maybe not!
The UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) claims that agriculture is one of the main sources of greenhouse gases, and is thus by many observers considered as a climate villain. This conclusion, however, is based on a paradigm that can be questioned, shows Per Frankelius, Linkoping University, in an article in Agronomy Journal. (2020-07-07)

Conservation agriculture increases carbon sequestration in extensive crops
A study performed by UCO (University of Cordoba) and IFAPA (Institute of Agricultural Research and Training) analyzed the potential of no-till farming in order to achieve the aims of the 4perMille initiative, that seeks to increase the amount of organic carbon in soil. (2020-07-07)

GPS isn't just for road trips anymore
Precision agriculture technologies can improve efficiency on smaller farms (2020-07-01)

Light pollution gives invasive cane toads a belly full of grub
Artificial light at night attracts insects, thus giving invasive cane toads in places like Australia a lot more food to eat, researchers have found, potentially giving a boost to such invasions. (2020-07-01)

Treatments tested for invasive pest on allium crops
A Cornell University-led team of researchers field-tested 14 active ingredients in insecticides, applied in a variety of methods, to understand the best treatment options against the Allium leafminer, a growing threat to onions, garlic and leeks. (2020-07-01)

Agricultural conservation schemes not enough to protect Britain's rarest butterflies
Conservation management around the margins of agriculture fail to protect butterfly species at greatest risk from the intensification of farming, a new study says. (2020-06-23)

Protecting natural forest in oil palm plantations crucial for conservation
A study, led by the University of York, has found that patches of protected forest on oil palm plantations play an important role in helping to conserve endangered species including hornbill birds and dipterocarp trees. (2020-06-22)

Agroforestry is 'win win' for bees and crops, study shows
Agroforestry has long been suggested as a solution to halt the decline of pollinators, yet observational studies in temperate climates have been virtually non-existent. New study shows planting woody plants alongside crops increases wild insect pollinator numbers and pollination. (2020-06-16)

Feeding habits differ by age and sex in Asian black bears: Data may help wildlife experts better manage bears' habitats
A ten-year study shows that Asian black bears' diets vary greatly depending on sex, stage of life, and resource availability, providing important information on foraging strategy according to age-sex classes. Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan published their findings on April 15 in Mammal Study. (2020-06-09)

How do land-use changes affect the spread of diseases between animals and people?
Most new viruses and other pathogens that arise in humans are transmitted from other animals, as in the case of the virus that causes COVID-19. A recent review published in Mammal Review examines how changes in land-use--such as deforestation, urbanization, and conversion to agriculture--have affected such transmission. (2020-06-03)

'Major gaps' in understanding how land-use changes affect spread of diseases
The quest to discover how new diseases -- such as Covid-19 -- emerge and spread in response to global land-use change driven by human population expansion still contains 'major gaps', researchers have claimed. (2020-06-03)

How bacteria fertilize soya
Soya and clover have their very own fertiliser factories in their roots, where bacteria manufacture ammonium, which is crucial for plant growth. Although this has long been common knowledge, scientists have only recently described the mechanism in detail. With biotechnology, this knowledge could now help make agriculture more sustainable. (2020-06-03)

The future is knocking: Global food production to be transformed using new technology
The world's growing population will necessitate a 30-70% increase in food production over the next 3 decades. If we are to succeed, it will require a complete overhaul of the way we produce food. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, among others, have now created an overview of solutions that include a number of new technologies that can collectively address this global challenge. (2020-05-20)

Game-changing technologies can transform our food systems
In the next three decades we will need a 30-70% increase in food availability to meet the demand from an increasing population. And the global food system will need to change profoundly if it is going to provide humanity with healthy food that is grown sustainably in ways that are not only resilient in the face of climate change but also do not surpass planetary boundaries. (2020-05-19)

Pollinator-friendly flowers planted along with crops aid bumblebees
A new study reported this week by evolutionary ecologist Lynn Adler at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Rebecca Irwin of North Carolina State University, with others, suggests that flower strips -- rows of pollinator-friendly flowers planted with crops -- offer benefits for common Eastern bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) colony reproduction, but some plants do increase pathogen infection risk. (2020-05-14)

Mathematics to keep farmers on track
Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology researchers use numerical simulations and frequency response analysis to model the stability of tractors on rough terrain, which may increase farmer safety and promote the automation of agriculture. (2020-05-11)

Winter warm spells see an increase in duration and frequency in UK temperature records
Warm winter spells have increased in frequency and duration two- to three times over since 1878, according to scientists led by the University of Warwick. (2020-05-06)

Warming Midwest conditions may result in corn, soybean production moving north
If warming continues unabated in the Midwest, in 50 years we can expect the best conditions for corn and soybean production to have shifted from Iowa and Illinois to Minnesota and the Dakotas, according to Penn State researchers. (2020-05-04)

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