Current Aid News and Events

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IU researchers find disease-related gene changes in kidney tissue
Researchers from Indiana University have identified key genetic changes in the interstitial kidney tissue of people with diabetes, a discovery that signifies the potential for a revolutionary new genetic approach to the treatment of kidney disease. They will contribute their findings to the Kidney Precision Medicine Project's (KPMP) ''cell atlas,'' a set of maps used to classify and locate different cell types and structures within the kidney. (2021-02-16)

After COVID-19 hit, federal financial aid applications dropped sharply among first-year students
After the COVID-19 crisis hit last March, federal student aid applications among potential college freshmen in California dropped 14 percent between mid-March and mid-August, relative to prior years. While there were also initial declines in applications among current undergraduates and graduate students, these quickly recovered and ended 8 percent higher relative to prior years. (2021-02-10)

New study points to better diagnostics for cancer
A new University of California, Irvine-led study finds a new method for identifying biomarkers may aid in early cancer diagnosis. The study focused on lung cancer, however the Cell Heterogeneity-Adjusted cLonal Methylation (CHALM) method has been tested on aging and Alzheimer's diseases as well and is expected to be effective for studying other diseases. (2021-01-27)

Study recommends rugby league invests in young players' diets
New QUT study recommends NRL rugby league clubs 'invest' in young players' diets to aid performance and recovery with the research outlining specific nutritional needs for the high-impact sport. (2021-01-22)

UN disaster aid is driven by humanitarian need rather than by strategic donor interests
A new study published in PNAS finds that aid provided by the United Nations (UN) in the aftermath of climate-related disasters is driven by humanitarian need rather than by strategic donor interests. The results underline the importance of climate-related hazards for understanding aid disbursements. (2021-01-18)

Better diet and glucose uptake in the brain lead to longer life in fruit flies
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered that fruit flies with genetic modifications to enhance glucose uptake have significantly longer lifespans. Looking at the brain cells of aging flies, they found that better glucose uptake compensates for age-related deterioration in motor functions, and led to longer life. The effect was more pronounced when coupled with dietary restrictions. This suggests healthier eating plus improved glucose uptake in the brain might lead to enhanced lifespans. (2021-01-16)

NYUAD study informs research of child development and learning in conflict-affected areas
To provide effective aid to children who live in areas of conflict it is necessary to understand precisely how they have been impacted by the crises around them. One area of importance is the effect of conflict and trauma on a child's development and education. Global TIES for Children researchers present a review of opportunities and challenges they have encountered in designing and conducting rigorous research that advances our understanding of this effect (2021-01-07)

Switching DNA functions on and off by means of light
Biochemists at Münster University have developed a new strategy for controlling the biological functions of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) by means of light and therefore provide a tool to investigate processes which take place in cells. The results have been published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2020-12-28)

Career thoughts and parental relationships in adolescents with ADHD
A new study published in The Career Development Quarterly looked for potential links between negative or dysfunctional career thoughts and the quality of parental relationships in high school students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2020-12-07)

Which speaker are you listening to? Hearing aid of the future uses brainwaves to find out
In a noisy room with many speakers, hearing aids can suppress background noise, but they have difficulties isolating one voice - that of the person you're talking to at a party, for instance. Researchers at KU Leuven, Belgium, have now addressed that issue with a technique that uses brainwaves to determine within one second whom you're listening to. (2020-11-24)

Biophysics - geometry supersedes simulations
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists have introduced a new method that allows biological pattern-forming systems to be systematically characterized with the aid of mathematical analysis. The trick lies in the use of geometry to characterize the dynamics. (2020-11-20)

A study analyses what leads US citizens to support intervention abroad
Researchers at UPF and at the Catholic University of Leuven have studied the different motivations and ways whereby the US intervenes in other countries to promote democracy, such as foreign aid, economic sanctions and military intervention. (2020-11-17)

Genetic eraser: Newly developed technology precisely and rapidly degrades targeted proteins
Researchers can now more accurately and precisely target specific proteins in yeast, mammalian cells and mice to study how knocking down specific protein traits can influence physical manifestation in a cell or organism. The Japan-based team published their results on November 11th in Nature Communications. (2020-11-11)

Research provides a new understanding of how a model insect species sees color
Through an effort to characterize the color receptors in the eyes of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, University of Minnesota researchers discovered the spectrum of light it can see deviates significantly from what was previously recorded. (2020-10-26)

Cause of Alzheimer's disease traced to mutation in common enzyme
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered a new mechanism by which clumps of tau protein are created in the brain, killing brain cells and causing Alzheimer's disease. A specific mutation to an enzyme called MARK4 changed the properties of tau, usually an important part of the skeletal structure of cells, making it more likely to aggregate, and more insoluble. Getting to grips with mechanisms like this may lead to breakthrough treatments. (2020-10-24)

High fructose intake may drive aggressive behaviors, ADHD, bipolar
New research suggests that conditions such as attention deficit hyperactivity syndrome (ADHD), bipolar disorder, and even aggressive behaviors may be linked with sugar intake, and that it may have an evolutionary basis. (2020-10-16)

Engineers print wearable sensors directly on skin without heat
Wearable sensors are evolving from watches and electrodes to bendable devices that provide far more precise biometric measurements and comfort for users. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the evolution one step further by printing sensors directly on human skin without the use of heat. (2020-10-12)

Safe resumption of research is important, feasible
At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, just as public institutions and businesses closed, research programs performing human participant research (HPR) also largely ceased operations. Now, universities and healthcare organizations conducting HPR are considering reopening. (2020-10-05)

Volunteers receiving government aid while unemployed face scrutiny, bias from public
With the worldwide spike in unemployment caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, many people may turn to volunteerism as a way to pass their newly found free time. But new research suggests that volunteers who also receive government aid are often judged negatively as ''wasting time'' that could be used to find paid employment. (2020-09-28)

Proof-of-concept for a new ultra-low-cost hearing aid for age-related hearing loss
A new ultra-affordable and accessible hearing aid made from open-source electronics could soon be available worldwide, according to a study published September 23, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Soham Sinha from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia, US, and colleagues. (2020-09-23)

Ultra-low-cost hearing aid could address age-related hearing loss worldwide
Using a device that could be built with a dollar's worth of open-source parts and a 3D-printed case, researchers want to help the hundreds of millions of older people worldwide who can't afford existing hearing aids to address their age-related hearing loss. (2020-09-23)

LSU Health New Orleans radiologists find chest X-rays highly predictive of COVID-19
A team of LSU Health New Orleans radiologists investigated the usefulness of chest x-rays in COVID-19 and found they could aid in a rapid diagnosis of the disease, especially in areas with limited testing capacity or delayed test results. (2020-09-03)

COVID-19 crisis exposes imbalance in EU state aid for aviation sector
Dr Steven Truxal, an aviation law expert in The City Law School, says state aid offered to airlines in response to the current crisis raises questions around unfair competition between European carriers and may be the subject of future challenge by carriers outside the EU. (2020-08-07)

New CT scanning method may improve heart massage
As part of an international collaboration, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, and University of Leicester, UK, have succeeded in developing a dynamic 3D CT scanning method that shows what happens inside the body during simulated heart massage. The method could help to increase the chance of surviving a cardiac arrest. (2020-08-06)

One-size does not fit all for post-disaster recovery, PSU study finds
A new Portland State University study that followed 400 households after the 2015 Nepal earthquakes provides insight into better understanding the factors that contribute to resilience and change in short-term rural natural disaster recovery. (2020-07-30)

Magnetic liquid structure elucidated through hybrid reverse Monte Carlo simulation
Magnetic ionic liquid structures were elucidated through hybrid reverse Monte Carlo simulation. The research results elucidated fundamental understanding of pure liquids with magnetic responses as well as lead to the development of MIL for a variety of practical applications. (2020-06-05)

Clever computing puts millions into charities' hands
Charities can now begin accessing millions of pounds more in donations thanks to a small shift in how people can donate. (2020-06-01)

Field study reveals how ammonia isotope molecules diffuse in air
A new study corrects the bias of passive sampler that monitors ammonia and offers a firmer handle on characterizing ammonia sources. The finding enhances our ability of quantifying which emissions may affect increasing ammonia in future. (2020-05-13)

Territorial short food supply chains foster food democracy and sustainability
A University of Cordoba study analyzed the governance mechanisms in territorial short food supply chains in Córdoba and Bogotá. (2020-04-14)

Isotope movement holds key to the power of fusion reactions
Controlling the uniformity of hydrogen isotope density ratio in fusion plasma is a problem for realizing fusion energy. The researchers have reached a key understanding of the process to make the hydrogen isotope ratio uniform using the Large Helical Device at the National Institute for Fusion Science. The uniformity is determined by isotope movement under the influence of plasma turbulence. This understanding would help researchers to increase the power of fusion reactions. (2020-02-26)

Hearing aids may delay cognitive decline, research finds
Wearing hearing aids may delay cognitive decline in older adults and improve brain function, according to promising new research. University of Melbourne researchers have tested the use of hearing aids in almost 100 adults aged 62-82 years with hearing loss. After 18 months of hearing aid use, researchers found speech perception, self-reported listening disability and quality of life had significantly improved for participants. (2020-02-26)

Tiny, erratic protein motor movements revealed
The smallest proteins travel in our cells, completing deeply important tasks to keep our molecular mechanisms moving. They are responsible for transporting cargo, duplicating cells and more. Now, a research team based in Japan has uncovered more about how these proteins move. (2020-02-14)

Government grants deliver highest returns for college financing, says study
Merit-based grants are a government's best bet for providing effective student aid for long-term economic growth - increasing both welfare (measured in terms of long-term well-being outcomes) and efficiency, according to a new joint study from the University of British Columbia, Queen's, Princeton and Yale. The study focuses on current education policy in the United States, and finds that the current system of grants and loans has significant long-term value. (2020-02-03)

Lung cancer screening decision aid delivered through tobacco quitlines improves informed decision-making
Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have shown that a decision aid delivered through tobacco quitlines effectively reaches a screening-eligible population and results in informed decisions about lung cancer screening. (2020-01-31)

To best treat a burn, first cool with running water, study shows
New research in the January edition of Annals of Emergency Medicine reveals that cooling with running water is the best initial treatment for a child's burn. Researchers found that cool running water can reduce the odds of needing a skin graft, expedite healing and lessen the chance that a young burn victim requires admission to the hospital or an operating procedure. (2020-01-30)

Virtual assistants provide disappointing advice when asked for first aid, emergency info
Virtual assistants don't yet live up to their considerable potential when it comes to providing users with reliable and relevant information on medical emergencies, according to a new study from University of Alberta researchers. (2020-01-28)

Developed a band-aid-like sensor to detect human body conditions in real-time
DGIST announced that Professor Hyuk-Jun Kwon in the Department of Information and Communication Engineering developed a 'patch-based health diagnosis sensor system' that is easily attached to skin with Professor Sunkook Kim's research team at Sungkyunkwan University. This sensor is attached to skin as if attaching band-aid and collects various health information in real-time by monitoring biosignals and certain movements, drawing huge expectations for diverse applications. (2020-01-08)

Online tool helps patients demystify the 'Pandora's box' of genomic sequencing
A decision aid developed to support patients undergoing genomic sequencing can reduce the amount of time patients spend speaking with overburdened genetic counselors while helping them feel more knowledgeable, suggests a study from St. Michael's Hospital. (2019-12-10)

Speedy and precise multicolor imaging of biomolecules now possible
For the first time, researchers can track biological molecules with unprecedented speed and precision thanks to the use of multi-metallic nanoparticles. The researchers published their results on October 17 in ACS Photonics, a journal of the American Chemical Society. (2019-12-09)

New tool to detect blackleg disease in potato has widespread application
'We hope Uniqprimer and the tests it designed will aid in the accurate detection of D. dianthicola and many other pathogens,' said lead author Shaista Karim. 'Accurate pathogen detection is the first step for management of a disease, which helps in reducing the losses in the potato industry and informing the farmers in a timely manner to better aid on-farm decision making.' (2019-12-05)

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